List of tallest buildings in St. Louis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
From across a river, a large arch is to the left of a group of tall buildings.
St. Louis at night, seen from across the Mississippi River. The Gateway Arch stands over the city, while One Metropolitan Square is visible to the right.
An aerial view of many skyscrapers and other buildings, with a dark blue river cutting down through the upper half.
A cluster of skyscrapers is located just west of the Gateway Arch and the Mississippi River.

St. Louis, Missouri is the 58th largest city in the United States[Note 1][1] and has the 89th most impressive skyline in the world, according to rankings by Emporis.[2] The tallest accessible structure in St. Louis is the 630-foot (190 m) high Gateway Arch, which was completed on October 28, 1965.[3] It also stands as the tallest monument in a national park, rising 75 feet (23 m) higher than the Washington Monument[3] (and still shorter than the San Jacinto Monument, 567 feet, Houston Ship Channel in Texas), and is the tallest accessible structure in Missouri.[Note 2][Note 3] The tallest habitable building in the city is the 42-story One Metropolitan Square, at a height of 593 feet (181 m), which was completed in 1989. It was designed by architecture firm Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (HOK), which is also headquartered in the building.[4][5] It is the second-highest building in Missouri and the tallest habitable building.[Note 2] HOK has also designed several other skyscrapers in St. Louis, including One AT&T Center[6] and the Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse.[7] As a result, the only three habitable buildings in St. Louis over 500 feet (150 m) tall have been designed by HOK. However, no buildings in Missouri are over 700 feet (210 m) and are therefore not among the tallest buildings in the United States.

The history of skyscrapers in St. Louis began with the 1850s construction of Barnum's City Hotel, a six-story building designed by architect George I. Barnett. Until the 1890s, no building in St. Louis rose over eight stories, but construction in the city rose during that decade, due to the development of elevators and the use of steel frames.[8] The first building to use a steel frame in St. Louis was the Wainwright Building, a 10-story office building and one of the first modern skyscrapers. The building, which was designed by Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler, illustrates Sullivan's principle of "form follows function".[9] From 1864–1894, the tallest building in St. Louis was the Old Courthouse, at a height of 192 feet (59 m).[10][11] Throughout the 1890s and into the 1900s, St. Louis saw construction move westward, especially that of office buildings. In 1914, the Railway Exchange Building was completed, which became the city's tallest building for many years.[8] The city then underwent a moderate building boom in the 1920s, leading to the planning of the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial in 1935.[8]

Recent development of new St. Louis high-rises has not seen much progress. The planned McGowan Walsh Tower (MW Tower) was put on hold in 2007 as a result of the economic situation at the time.[12] If completed, the building would be the tallest building in both St. Louis and Missouri, at a height of over 1,000 feet (300 m) and 90 stories.[13] The Renaissance on Euclid, a planned 30-floor, $115 million condominium project[14] was later canceled.[15] The 26-story Lindell Condominiums were also canceled[16] as a result of a court ruling that the construction of high-rise buildings would not be permitted in the Central West End Historic District, where the complex was planned. The condos had already been approved when two residents filed suit to stop the plan.[17] In addition, the proposed Bottle District Residential Towers project were canceled as well. Architect Daniel Libeskind designed the three towers of the $290 million proposal, which would have boasted St. Louis's tallest building if it had been completed.[Note 4][18][19] Construction for the $70 million, 25-story, 300 feet (91 m) Roberts Tower began in 2009. As a result of economic issues, work on the tower stalled in January 2010, although it soon restarted.[20][21]

Tallest buildings[edit]

A large arch is in the center, across from a river. A clump of tall buildings is scattered behind it.
A panoramic view of the St. Louis skyline, dominated by the 630-foot (190 m) Gateway Arch.

This list ranks St. Louis skyscrapers that stand at least 250 feet (76 m) tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed. The "Floors" column indicates floors above ground only.

A very tall building looking up from ground level.
One Metropolitan Square is the tallest habitable structure in both St. Louis and Missouri.[Note 3]
A tall, domed tower sticks out from a smaller plaza.
The Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse is the second-tallest court building in the world and the third-tallest building in St. Louis.
A tall, thin building with small windows is nestled between two other buildings.
One AT&T center is the second-tallest building in St. Louis.
A glassy black tower stands beyond some small trees.
Bank of America Plaza is the eighth-tallest building in St. Louis.
Rank Name Height
feet / m
Floors Year Notes
[Note 2] Gateway Arch 630 / 192 n/a 1967 Tallest monument and memorial in the United States.[3][22][23]
1 One Metropolitan Square 593 / 181 42 1989 Tallest habitable building in St. Louis and second tallest habitable building in Missouri.[Note 2] Tallest building in St. Louis built in the 1980s.[4][5]
2 One AT&T Center 588 / 179 44 1986 Formerly One SBC Center, tallest building in St. Louis until the construction of One Metropolitan Square.[6][24]
3 Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse 557 / 170 28 2000 Second-tallest judicial building in the world, tallest building built in St. Louis in the 2000s.[7][25]
4 One US Bank Plaza 484 / 148 35 1976 Tallest building in St. Louis until the construction of One AT&T Center in 1986.[26][27]
5 Laclede Gas Building 401 / 122 31 1969 Tallest building in St. Louis until the construction of One US Bank Plaza in 1976.[28][29]
6 Southwestern Bell Building 399 / 122 28 1926 Tallest building in St. Louis until the construction of the Laclede Gas Building.[30][31]
7 Civil Courts Building 386 / 118 13 1929 [32][33]
8 Bank of America Plaza 384 / 117 31 1981 [34][35]
9 One City Center 375 / 114 25 1985 Formerly called St. Louis Centre and was the largest urban shopping mall in the U.S. when it opened.[Note 5][36][37]
10 Park East Tower 330 / 101 26 2007 Tallest building outside of downtown St. Louis.[38][39]
11 Queeny Tower 321 / 98 19 1965 [40][41]
12 Tower at OPOP (Formerly Roberts Tower) 312 / 95 25 2010 [42][43]
13 Park Plaza 310 / 94 27 1931 Tallest building built in St. Louis during the 1930s.[44][45]
14 Saint Francis de Sales Church 300 / 91 3 1895 Tallest church in St. Louis.[46][47]
15 1010 Market Street 296 / 90 20 1981 Tallest building in St. Louis known only by its street address.[48][49]
16= Four Seasons Hotel St. Louis 289 / 88 24 2007 [50][51]
16= Millennium Hotel St. Louis 289 / 88 28 1968 Formerly Stouffer's Riverfront Towers and the Regal Riverfront Hotel.[52][53]
18 Continental Life Building 286 / 87 22 1930 Tallest building in Midtown St. Louis.[54][55]
19= Mansion House 285 / 87 28 1965 [56][57]
19= Crowne Plaza St. Louis 285 / 87 28 1965 Formerly the Radisson Hotel & Suites St. Louis.[58][59]
19= Gentry's Landing 285 / 87 28 1965 [60][61]
22 500 Broadway 282 / 86 22 1971 [62][63]
23= Council House East 279 / 85 26 1969 [64][65]
23= Equitable Building 279 / 85 21 1971 [66][67]
23= Hilton East Tower 279 / 85 25 1964 [68][69]
26 Railway Exchange Building 277 / 84 22 1914 Tallest building in St. Louis built during the 1910s and world's largest office building in 1914.[70][71][72]
27 Bank of America Tower 275 / 84 22 1976 [73][74]
28 Barnes-Jewish Hospital South 269 / 82 18 1971 Largest hospital in Missouri. Originally 12 stories and 177 feet (54 m) tall, but additional floors were later added to the top of the building.[75][76]
29 Renaissance St. Louis Suites Hotel 268 / 82 24 1925 Formerly the Lennox Hotel, tallest building in St. Louis in 1925.[77][78]
30 Union Pacific Company Building 265 / 81 23 1928 Formerly the Missouri Pacific Building. It was planned to be 35 stories but ended at 23 stories because of the Great Depression.[79][80]
31 KMOV Gateway Tower 261 / 80 21 1967 Also known as the CBS Gateway Tower.[81][82]
32 Dorchester Apartments 260 / 79 23 1963 [83]
33 Saint Louis Place 253 / 77 20 1983 [84][85]
34= Millennium Center 250 / 76 20 1963 [86][87]
34= Desloge Towers 250 / 76 15 1933 [88][89]

Tallest buildings by pinnacle height[edit]

A tall building with a triangular frame on the exterior.
One US Bank Plaza is the third-tallest building in St. Louis when ranked by pinnacle height.

This list ranks St. Louis skyscrapers based on their pinnacle height, which includes radio masts and antennas. As architectural features and spires can be regarded as subjective, some skyscraper enthusiasts prefer this method of measurement. Standard architectural height measurement, which excludes antennas in building height, is included for comparative purposes.

Rank Name Pinnacle height
feet / m
Standard height
feet / m
Notes
1[Note 2] Gateway Arch 630 / 192 630 / 192 [5]
2 One Metropolitan Square 593 / 181 593 / 181 [5]
3 One US Bank Plaza 592 / 180 484 / 148 [27]
4 One AT&T Center 588 / 179 588 / 179 [24]
5 Marquette Building 585 / 178 241 / 74 [90]
6 Thomas F. Eagleton United States Courthouse 557 / 170 557 / 170 [25]
7 Southwestern Bell Building 460 / 140 399 / 122 [31]

Tallest under construction, approved, and proposed[edit]

This lists buildings that are under construction, approved, or proposed in St. Louis and are planned to rise over 300 feet (91 m). A floor count of 20 stories is used in place of the 300-foot (91 m) limit if the building's proposed height has not yet been determined.

Name Height*
feet / m
Floors Year Status Notes
MW Tower 1,001 / 305 90 Unknown Cancelled [13]
Ballpark Village Tower III Unknown 27 Unknown Proposed [91]

Timeline of tallest buildings[edit]

A squarish brown building is at a street corner.
The Railway Exchange Building was St. Louis's tallest building from 1914 to 1926.

This lists buildings that once held the title of tallest building in St. Louis, based on standard height measurement.

Name Street address Years as tallest Height
feet / m
Floors References
Old Courthouse Between Broadway, Chestnut, Fourth, & Market Streets 1864–1894 192 / 59 2 [10][11]
St. Louis Union Station 1820 Market Street 1894–1914 230 / 70 6 [92][93]
Railway Exchange Building 601–629 Olive Street 1914–1926 277 / 84 21 [94][95]
Southwestern Bell Building 108–116 North 11th Street 1926–1969 399 / 122 28 [30][31]
Laclede Gas Building 716–726 Olive Street 1969–1976 401 / 122 31 [28][29]
One US Bank Plaza 505 North 7th Street 1976–1986 484 / 148 35 [26][27]
One AT&T Center 900–928 Pine Street 1986–1989 588 / 179 44 [6][24]
One Metropolitan Square 201–227 North Broadway 1989–present 593 / 181 42 [4][5]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ St. Louis is an independent city, while most other major U.S. cities are part of a county.
  2. ^ a b c d e The Gateway Arch is actually the 52nd tallest structure in Missouri (which includes antenna masts, chimneys, etc.). Although it is not habitable, the Arch is included on this list for comparative purposes.
  3. ^ a b When using standard height measurement, One Kansas City Place is the second-tallest building in Missouri, although it is taller than even the Gateway Arch when its antenna is included in the measurement.
  4. ^ That is, before the completion of the proposed MW Tower.
  5. ^ The mall itself has closed, although the building is still used for office space.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Table 1: Annual Estimates of the Population for Incorporated Places Over 100,000, Ranked by July 1, 2008 Population: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2008" (CSV). 2008 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. 2009-07-01. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  2. ^ "Emporis Skyline Ranking". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 
  3. ^ a b c "How Tall is it?". National Park Service. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  4. ^ a b c "One Metropolitan Square". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-01-07. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "Metropolitan Square". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  6. ^ a b c "One AT&T Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  7. ^ a b "Thomas F. Eagleton Courthouse". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  8. ^ a b c "Downtown (C.B.D.)". City of St. Louis. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  9. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1979). A concise history of American architecture. Boulder, Colorado: Westview Press. pp. 180–1. ISBN 0-06-430086-2. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  10. ^ a b "Old Courthouse". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  11. ^ a b "Old Courthouse". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  12. ^ Gabert, Shelley (2008-09-01). "The Block Builder". St. Louis Magazine. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  13. ^ a b "MW Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  14. ^ Cole, Heather (2005-10-21). "Mills doubles Renaissance to $115 million". American City Business Journals, Inc. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  15. ^ "Renaissance on Euclid". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  16. ^ "Lindell Condominiums". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  17. ^ Krekeler, Kara (2007-12-26). "Keep it down! Judge backs lower heights for new buildings in CWE". West End Word. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  18. ^ Brown, Lisa R. (2005-05-20). "Libeskind redraws St. Louis skyline". American City Business Journals, Inc. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  19. ^ "The Bottle District Residential Tower III". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-07. 
  20. ^ Bryant, Tim (2009-08-11). "Roberts Tower crane headed up". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 2010-02-08. [dead link]
  21. ^ Bryant, Tim (2010-01-25). "Roberts Tower back on track?". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Retrieved 2010-02-08. [dead link]
  22. ^ "Gateway Arch". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  23. ^ "Gateway Arch". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 201-02-09. 
  24. ^ a b c "One SBC Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  25. ^ a b "Eagleton Federal Courthouse". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  26. ^ a b "One US Bank Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  27. ^ a b c "One US Bank Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  28. ^ a b "Laclede Gas Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  29. ^ a b "Laclede Gas Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  30. ^ a b "Southwestern Bell Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  31. ^ a b c "Southwestern Bell Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  32. ^ "Civil Courts Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  33. ^ "Civil Courts Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  34. ^ "Bank of America Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  35. ^ "Bank of America Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  36. ^ "One City Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  37. ^ "One City Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  38. ^ "Park East Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  39. ^ "Park East Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  40. ^ "Queeny Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  41. ^ "Queeny Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  42. ^ "Roberts Tower at Mayfair Plaza". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  43. ^ "Roberts Tower at Mayfair Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  44. ^ "Park Plaza Apartments". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  45. ^ "Park Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  46. ^ "Saint Francis de Sales Church". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  47. ^ "St. Francis de Sales Church". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  48. ^ "1010 Market Street". Emporis.Com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  49. ^ "1010 Market Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  50. ^ "Four Seasons Hotel St. Louis". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  51. ^ "Lumière Place Four Seasons". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  52. ^ "Millennium Hotel St. Louis". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  53. ^ "Millennium Hotel". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  54. ^ "Continental Life Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  55. ^ "Continental Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  56. ^ "mansion House Apartments". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  57. ^ "Mansion House". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  58. ^ "Crowne Plaza St. Louis". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  59. ^ "Radisson Hotel". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  60. ^ "The Gentry's Landing". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  61. ^ "Gentry's Landing". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  62. ^ "500 Broadway". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  63. ^ "500 Broadway". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  64. ^ "Council House East". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  65. ^ "Council House East". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  66. ^ "Equitable Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  67. ^ "Equitable Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  68. ^ "Hilton - St. Louis at the Ballpark East Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  69. ^ "Hilton East Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  70. ^ Brown, Lisa R. (2008-09-05). "Macy’s selling downtown building; store to stay open". American City Business Journals, Inc. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  71. ^ "Railway Exchange Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  72. ^ "Railway Exchange Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  73. ^ "Bank of America Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  74. ^ "Bank of America Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  75. ^ "Barnes-Jewish Hospital South". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  76. ^ "Barnes-Jewish Hospital South". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  77. ^ "Renaissance St. Louis Suites Hotel". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  78. ^ "Renaissance St. Louis Suites Hotel". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  79. ^ "Union Pacific Company Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  80. ^ "Missouri Pacific Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  81. ^ "KMOV Gateway Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  82. ^ "Gateway Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  83. ^ "Dorchester Apartments". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  84. ^ "Saint Louis Place". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  85. ^ "Saint Louis Place". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  86. ^ "Millennium Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  87. ^ "Millennium Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  88. ^ "Desloge Towers". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  89. ^ "Desloge Towers". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-10. 
  90. ^ "Marquette Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-11. 
  91. ^ "Ballpark Village Tower III". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-09. 
  92. ^ "St. Louis Union Station". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  93. ^ "Union Station". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  94. ^ "Railway Exchange Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 
  95. ^ "Railway Exchange Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2010-02-12. 

External links[edit]