List of the Catholic dioceses of the United States

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Provinces and dioceses of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. Each color represents one of the 32 Latin-rite provinces.

The following is the list of the Catholic dioceses and archdioceses of the United States. This list includes not only dioceses of the Latin or Western Church but also the eparchies (dioceses) of the Eastern Catholic Churches that are in full communion with the Bishop of Rome.

The Catholic Church in the United States comprises 195 particular churches, of which the 194 dioceses and one apostolic exarchate[1] are each led by a bishop. In the United States, state, counties or county equivalents are usually used to determine boundaries of most territorial dioceses.[2] There are also nationwide or large area dioceses defined by rite for many Eastern Catholics. In addition to the 195 territorial dioceses and exarchate, there is the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, which ministers to Catholics serving in the military or diplomatic corps and their dependents. Dioceses led by archbishops are called archdioceses. There are 32 archdioceses whose archbishops serve as the metropolitans of 32 Roman Catholic ecclesiastical provinces in the United States. The Roman Catholic Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, is not a metropolitan see. The Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter was established on January 1, 2012, for former Anglicans to join the Catholic Church.[3]

In addition to the 195 dioceses and the single exarchate whose bishops are members of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), there are several other dioceses in the nation's unincorporated territories (i.e., in Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands).

The United States Catholic population is mainly of the Latin Church, but eparchies and archeparchies of the Eastern Catholic Churches exist in the nation. These particular Churches are also organized into ecclesiastical provinces of their own or are exempt dioceses immediately subject to the Holy See.

Dioceses and archdioceses are normally named by the city in which the bishop or archbishop has his seat. The diocese may take in a much wider area: e.g., the Eparchy of Our Lady of Deliverance of Newark for Syrian Rite Catholics actually serves all Syrian Catholics in the entire United States and Canada; the Diocese of Albany serves not just the city of Albany, NY, but also a large portion of central New York State.

All Catholic bishops from the United States and the U. S. Virgin Islands—whether diocesan, coadjutor, or auxiliary; Latin Rite or Eastern Rite—are members of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Bishops from Puerto Rico form the Episcopal Conference of Puerto Rico,[4] while bishops in the overseas dependencies in the Pacific Ocean are members of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.

Contents

Ecclesiastical province of Anchorage[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Anchorage comprises the state of Alaska.

Ecclesiastical province of Atlanta[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Atlanta comprises the states of Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

Ecclesiastical province of Baltimore[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Baltimore comprises all but five counties of the state of Maryland,[5] and all of the states of Delaware, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Ecclesiastical province of Boston[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Boston comprises the states of Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, and Vermont.

Ecclesiastical province of Chicago[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Chicago comprises the state of Illinois.

Ecclesiastical province of Cincinnati[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Cincinnati comprises the state of Ohio.

Ecclesiastical province of Denver[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Denver comprises the states of Colorado and Wyoming.

Ecclesiastical province of Detroit[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Detroit comprises the state of Michigan.

Ecclesiastical province of Dubuque[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Dubuque comprises the state of Iowa.

Ecclesiastical province of Galveston-Houston[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Galveston-Houston comprises the eastern and southern counties of the state of Texas.

Ecclesiastical province of Hartford[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Hartford comprises the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island, as well as a small portion of New York.[7]

Ecclesiastical province of Indianapolis[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Indianapolis comprises the state of Indiana.

Ecclesiastical province of Kansas City[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Kansas City comprises the state of Kansas.

Ecclesiastical province of Los Angeles[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Los Angeles comprises the southern and central counties of the state of California.

Ecclesiastical province of Louisville[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Louisville comprises the states of Kentucky and Tennessee.

Ecclesiastical province of Miami[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Miami comprises the state of Florida.

Ecclesiastical province of Milwaukee[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Milwaukee comprises the state of Wisconsin.

Ecclesiastical province of Mobile[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Mobile comprises the states of Alabama and Mississippi.

Ecclesiastical province of New Orleans[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of New Orleans comprises the state of Louisiana.

Ecclesiastical province of New York[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of New York comprises the state of New York, except for a small portion that belongs to the Province of Hartford.[7]

Ecclesiastical province of Newark[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Newark comprises the state of New Jersey.

Ecclesiastical province of Oklahoma City[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Oklahoma City comprises the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma.

Ecclesiastical province of Omaha[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Omaha comprises the state of Nebraska.

Ecclesiastical province of Philadelphia[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Philadelphia comprises the state of Pennsylvania.

Ecclesiastical province of Portland[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Portland comprises the states of Idaho, Montana and Oregon.

Ecclesiastical province of Saint Louis[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Saint Louis comprises the state of Missouri.

Ecclesiastical province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Saint Paul and Minneapolis comprises the states of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Ecclesiastical province of San Antonio[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of San Antonio comprises the western and northern counties of the state of Texas.

Ecclesiastical province of San Francisco[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of San Francisco comprises the northern counties of the state of California and all of the states of Hawaii, Nevada and Utah.

Ecclesiastical province of Santa Fe[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Santa Fe comprises the states of Arizona and New Mexico.

Ecclesiastical province of Seattle[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Seattle comprises the state of Washington.

Ecclesiastical province of Washington[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of Washington comprises the District of Columbia, five neighboring counties in Maryland and the U.S. Virgin Islands.[5]

Ecclesiastical province of Agaña[edit]

The Ecclesistical Province of Agaña comprises the United States overseas dependencies of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands and the unorganized, unincorporated territory of Wake Island. Also included are the sovereign and independent nations of the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, and Palau.

Ecclesiastical province of Samoa-Apia[edit]

The Ecclesisatical Province of Samoa-Apia is primarily composed of territory outside of the United States, however, it includes as a suffragan a single diocese that comprises an overseas dependency of the United States, American Samoa.

Ecclesiastical province of San Juan de Puerto Rico[edit]

The Ecclesiastical Province of San Juan de Puerto Rico comprises the United States Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

Province of Philadelphia (Ukrainian)[edit]

The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church in the United States is organized into a metropolia (or province) consisting of a metropolitan archeparchy and three suffragan eparchies.

Province of Pittsburgh (Ruthenian)[edit]

The Ruthenian Catholic Church in the United States is organized into the sui iuris Province of Pittsburgh, consisting of a metropolitan archeparchy and three suffragan eparchies. The eparchies also serve the faithful of other Byzantine Rite Churches without established hierarchies in the United States, namely those of the Albanian, Belarussian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Greek, Hungarian, Italo-Albanian, Macedonian, Russian, and Slovakian Byzantine Catholic Churches.

Eastern Catholic Eparchies Immediately Subject to the Holy See[edit]

The following particular churches of various Eastern Rites are not suffragan to metropolitan sees, but are instead immediately subject to the Holy See, although juridically they remain part of their respective patriarchal or major archiepiscopal Churches.

Armenian Catholic Church

Chaldean Catholic Church

Maronite Catholic Church

Melkite Greek Catholic Church

Romanian Catholic Church

Syrian Catholic Church

Syro-Malabar Catholic Church

Syro-Malankara Catholic Church

Military Archdiocese[edit]

Members of the Armed Forces of the United States and their dependents, employees of the U.S. Veterans Health Administration and its patients, and Americans in government service overseas, including the nation's diplomatic corps and their dependents — both Latin and Eastern — are served by the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, a non-metropolitan archdiocese (that is, without suffragan dioceses within a territorial province). It is led by an archbishop, who at present is assisted by three auxiliary bishops.

Personal Ordinariate[edit]

Under the provisions of Anglicanorum Coetibus, issued in 2009, an effort was underway to establish a personal ordinariate, or diocese, in the United States. The ordinariate was formed for former Anglicans, including members from the Episcopal Church and Continuing Anglican churches, and Anglican Use parishes. The world's first such ordinariate is the Personal Ordinariate of Our Lady of Walsingham of England and Wales. The personal ordinariate for the United States, the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter, was established on January 1, 2012 in accordance with the apostolic constitution Anglicanorum coetibus of Pope Benedict XVI.[3]

Gallery of Archdioceses[edit]

Gallery of Dioceses[edit]


Former Dioceses[edit]

Diocese Cathedral History Ref.
Roman Catholic Diocese of Allegheny St. Peter's Church •1876.01.11: Established as Diocese of Allegheny from Diocese of Pittsburgh
•1889.07.01: Suppressed to Diocese of Pittsburgh
•1971: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Allegheny
[8]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Alton Church of Sts. Peter and Paul •1857.01.09: Established as Diocese of Alton from the suppressed Diocese of Quincy
•1887.01.07: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Belleville
•1923.10.26: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Springfield in Illinois
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Alton
[9]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Bardstown Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral •1808.04.08: Established as Diocese of Bardstown from Diocese of Baltimore
•1821.06.19: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Cincinnati
•1834.05.06: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Vincennes
•1837.07.28: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Nashville
•1841.02.13: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Louisville
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Bardstown
[10]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Concordia Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church •1887.08.02: Established as Diocese of Concordia from Diocese of Leavenworth
•1944.12.23: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Salina
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Concordia
[11]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Grass Valley St. Patrick Church •1860.09.27: Established as Apostolic Vicariate of Marysville from Metropolitan Archdiocese of San Francisco
•1868.03.22: Promoted as Diocese of Grass Valley
•1886.05.28: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Sacramento
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Grass Valley
[12]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Jamestown Basilica of St. James •1889.11.10: Established as Diocese of Jamestown from Apostolic Vicariate of Dakota
•1897.04.06: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Fargo
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Jamestown
[13]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Kearney •1912.03.08: Established as Diocese of Kearney from Diocese of Omaha
•1917.04.11: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Grand Island
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Kearney
[14]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Lead St. Patrick’s Church •1902.08.04: Established as Diocese of Lead from Diocese of Sioux Falls
•1930.08.01: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Rapid City
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Lead
[15]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Leavenworth Church of the Immaculate Conception •1850.07.19: Established as Apostolic Vicariate of Indian Territory East of the Rocky Mountains from Diocese of New Orleans
•1857.01.06: Lost territory to establish Apostolic Vicariate of Nebraska
•1857: Renamed as Apostolic Vicariate of Kansas
•1877.05.22: Promoted as Diocese of Leavenworth
•1887.08.02: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Wichita and Diocese of Concordia
•1891.05.29: Renamed as Diocese of Kansas City, Kansas
•1897.03.05: Renamed as Diocese of Leavenworth
•1947.05.10: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Kansas City
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Leavenworth
[16]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Natchez St. Mary Basilica •1826.07.18: Established as Apostolic Vicariate of Mississippi from Diocese of Louisiana
•1837.07.28: Promoted as Diocese of Natchez
•1956.12.18: Renamed as Diocese of Natchez–Jackson
•1977.03.01: Suppressed as Titular Episcopal See of Natchez to establish Diocese of Biloxi and Diocese of Jackson
[17]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Natchitoches Basilica of the Immaculate Conception •1853.07.29: Established as Diocese of Natchitoches from Metropolitan Archdiocese of New Orleans
•1910.08.06: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Alexandria
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Natchitoches
[18]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Nesqually Proto-Cathedral of St. James the Greater •1850.05.31: Established as Diocese of Nesqually from Diocese of Walla Walla
•1853.07.29: Gained territory from the suppressed Diocese of Walla Walla
•1907.09.11: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Seattle
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Nesqually
[19]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Oregon City St. John the Apostle Church •1843.12.01: Established as Apostolic Vicariate of Oregon from Metropolitan Archdiocese of Baltimore and Archdiocese of Québec
•1846.07.24: Promoted as Diocese of Oregon City, lost territory to establish Diocese of Vancouver Island and Diocese of Walla Walla
•1850.07.29: Promoted as Metropolitan Archdiocese of Oregon City
•1868.03.03: Lost territory to establish Apostolic Vicariate of Idaho and Montana
•1894: Gained territory from Diocese of Vancouver Island
•1903.06.19: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Baker City
•1928.09.26: Suppressed to establish Metropolitan Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon
•1996: Restored as Titular Metropolitan See of Oregon City
[20]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Quincy •1853.07.29: Established as Diocese of Quincy from Diocese of Chicago
•1857.01.09: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Alton
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Quincy
[21]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie Holy Name of Mary Pro-Cathedral •1853.07.29: Established as Apostolic Vicariate of Upper Michigan from Diocese of Detroit
•1857.01.09: Promoted as Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie
•1865.10.23: Renamed as Diocese of Sault Sainte Marie–Marquette
•1937.01.03: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Marquette
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Sault Sainte Marie
•1996: Renamed as Titular Episcopal See of Sault Sainte Marie in Michigan
[22]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Vincennes Basilica of St. Francis Xavier •1834.05.06: Established as Diocese of Vincennes from Diocese of Bardstown
•1857.01.08: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Fort Wayne
•1898.03.28: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Indianapolis
•1995: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Vincennes
[23]
Roman Catholic Diocese of Walla Walla •1846.07.24: Established as Diocese of Walla Walla from Apostolic Vicariate of Oregon
•1850.05.31: Lost territory to establish Diocese of Nesqually
•1853.07.29: Suppressed to establish Diocese of Nesqually
•1971: Restored as Titular Episcopal See of Walla Walla
[24]

Gallery of Former Seats[edit]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ On July 14, 2010, Pope Benedict XVI erected an apostolic exarchate (similar to an apostolic vicariate in the Latin Church) — the Syro-Malankara Catholic Exarchate in the United States — for Syro-Malankara Catholics in the United States. Although not the same as an eparchy (diocese), an exarchate is still led by a bishop.
  2. ^ For exceptions, see Ecclesiastical province#Provincial boundary lines.
  3. ^ a b Cardinal Levada, William (January 1, 2012). Decree of Erection of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter. Holy See. 
  4. ^ Conferencia Episcopal Puertorriqueña (C.E.P.). GCatholic.org website. Retrieved 2011-02-13.
  5. ^ a b Maryland is unusual in that fourteen of its 23 counties belong to dioceses whose see cities are outside Maryland: (1) the nine counties of Maryland's Eastern Shore (Delmarva Peninsula) are part of the Diocese of Wilmington (Delaware) and (2) the five counties adjacent to the District of Columbia and in southern Maryland are part of the Archdiocese of Washington, which is a different province. Only the remaining nine counties and the City of Baltimore are part of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.
  6. ^ a b For other such dioceses, see Ecclesiastical province#Provincial boundary lines.
  7. ^ a b Fishers Island, a part of Suffolk County, New York, and north of Long Island, is part of the Diocese of Norwich, Connecticut, which is in the Province of Hartford.
  8. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0097.htm
  9. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0101.htm
  10. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0275.htm
  11. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0556.htm
  12. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0897.htm
  13. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0949.htm
  14. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0959.htm
  15. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0993.htm
  16. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t0994.htm
  17. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1229.htm
  18. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1230.htm
  19. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1253.htm
  20. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1316.htm
  21. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1440.htm
  22. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1523.htm
  23. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1973.htm
  24. ^ http://www.gcatholic.org/dioceses/former/t1986.htm

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