List of the first LGBT holders of political offices in the United States

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As of 2012:

  • all 50 states have been served by openly LGBT elected politicians in some capacity;[1]
  • at least 41 states have elected openly LGBT politicians to one or both houses of their state legislature;
  • only one state governor has ever come out as gay;
  • no openly LGBT governor or United States president has ever been elected to office.
  • no openly LGBT person has been named or served as a federal Cabinet member[2]

Federal[edit]

Congress[edit]

By state delegation[edit]

  • Arizona
    • Rep. Jim Kolbe (R) – elected 1985–2007; came out voluntarily 1996 while in office
    • Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D) – elected 2012
  • California:
  • Colorado:
  • Connecticut
    • Rep. Stewart McKinney (R) – elected 1971–1987; died of AIDS in 1987 and was actively, though not openly, bisexual
  • Florida:
  • Maine:
    • Rep. Mike Michaud (D) - elected 2003, came out as gay in 2013 while running for Governor of Maine.
  • Maryland:
    • Rep. Robert Bauman (R) – elected 1973–1981; sexuality revealed after soliciting sex from a 16-year-old male prostitute
  • Massachusetts:
    • Rep. Gerry Studds (D) – elected 1973–1997; came out involuntary in 1983 due to sexual relations with a 17-year-old United States House of Representatives Page (see 1983 congressional page sex scandal)
    • Rep. Barney Frank (D) – elected 1980–2013; came out voluntarily in 1987 after Steve Gobie, a male prostitute who Frank had hired for sex and who later became his friend, personal assistant, and housekeeper, tried to sell his story to the Washington Times
  • Mississippi
    • Rep. Jon Hinson (R) – elected 1979–1981; sexuality revealed after he was arrested February 5, 1981, and charged with sodomy[6] for performing oral sex on a male employee of the Library of Congress in a restroom of the House of Representatives, leading him to resign
  • New York:
  • Rhode Island:
  • Wisconsin:
    • Senator: Tammy Baldwin (female) (D) – elected 2012
    • Representative: Tammy Baldwin (female) (D) – served 1999–2013
    • Representative: Steve Gunderson (male) (R) – served 1981–1997; came out involuntarily 1994
    • Representative: Mark Pocan (D) – elected 2012; out when elected

State[edit]

State officers by state[edit]

Legislative officials[edit]

  • California:
  • Colorado:
  • Hawaii:
    • House Majority Leader: Rep. Blake Oshiro (D) (elected 2008, came out 2011)
  • Massachusetts:
    • Senate Minority Leader: Sen. Richard Tisei (R) (elected 2007, came out 2010)
    • Senate Majority Leader: Sen. Stan Rosenberg (D) (elected 2013, came out 2009)
  • Minnesota:
  • Missouri:
    • Senate Minority Floor Leader: Sen. Jolie Justus (D) (2012)
  • Oregon:
    • House Speaker: Rep. Tina Kotek (D) – America's first openly lesbian House speaker (elected as Oregon's House speaker in 2012) [9]
  • Rhode Island:
  • Washington:
    • Senate Majority Leader: Sen. Ed Murray (D) (2012)

State legislators[edit]

The legislatures of 42 states have had at least one openly LGBT member; the first out person to serve in each of those states is listed here. The eight remaining states that have never had an openly LGBT state legislator are Alaska, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nebraska, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

  • California:
    • Assemblywoman (later Sen.) Sheila Kuehl (female) (D) – elected 1994 to House; elected to Senate in 2000
    • Assemblymen John Laird and Mark Leno (later Sen.) (male) (D) - elected 2002 to House; Leno elected to Senate in 2002
    • Rep. John Pérez (male) (D) – first Speaker, appointed 2010
    • Assemblywoman Toni Atkins (female) (D) - Speaker, elected 2014
  • Hawaii:
    • Rep. Joe Bertram (male) (D) – elected 2006
    • Rep. Georgette Jo Jordan (female) (Dem) - appointed January 2011; elected November 2012
    • Rep. Blake Oshiro (D) – first House Majority Leader, came out 2010
  • Minnesota:
    • Sen. Allan Spear (male) (D) – elected 1972, came out December 1974
    • Rep. Karen Clark (female) (D) – elected 1981, out when first elected[13]
    • Sen. Paul Koering (male) (R) - elected 2002; "came out" 2005; re-elected in 2006
  • Oklahoma:
    • Rep. (now Sen.) Al McAffrey (male) (D) – elected 2006; elected first state senator 2012
    • Rep. Kay Floyd (female) (D) – elected 2012
  • Virginia:
    • Del. (now Sen.) Adam Ebbin (D) – elected 2003; elected first state senator 2011
  • Wisconsin:
    • Rep. (later Sen.) Tim Carpenter (male) (D) – elected to Assembly in 1984, came out in 2001, elected to Senate in 2002
    • Rep. (later U.S. Sen.) Tammy Baldwin (female; lesbian) (D) – elected 1993
    • Rep. JoCasta Zamarripa (female; bisexual) (D) – elected 2010; came out 2012

Territorial legislators[edit]

Local[edit]

Executive[edit]

By state[edit]

Legislative[edit]

By state[edit]

By territory[edit]

  • Puerto Rico
    • San Juan
      • Councilmember: Pedro Peters Maldonado, elected 2012[25]

Judicial[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Reese, Phil (April 26, 2012). "2012 proving busy year for Victory Fund". Washington Blade. Retrieved 2012-04-27. 
  2. ^ Johnson, Chris. "Obama criticized for lack of LGBT Cabinet appointments". Washington Blade. 
  3. ^ Housecleaning, Time, July 25, 1983
  4. ^ http://www.abc4.com/mostpopular/story/Democrat-Sinema-wins-Arizona-congressional-seat/EYVFjL_O4U6i8rxvh5a2kA.cspx. Retrieved 2013-12-03.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  5. ^ a b c d e f Dison, Denis (November 7, 2012). "Victory Fund celebrates huge night for gay candidates". Gay Politics. Retrieved 2012-11-08. 
  6. ^ "The New York Times". Select.nytimes.com. 1981-02-05. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  7. ^ Bolcer, Julie (2012-11-07). "Openly Gay Congressional Winner Makes History in New York". Advocate.com. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  8. ^ Curry, Tom (2004-08-13). "McGreevey confession doesn't reveal all". MSNBC. Retrieved 2008-03-10. 
  9. ^ http://www.bendbulletin.com/article/20121116/NEWS0107/211160415/. Retrieved 2013-12-03.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ Siadate, Nazly (2012-08-23). "Americas Six Out Bisexual Elected State Officials". Advocate.com. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  11. ^ "Matt & Andrej Koymasky - Famous GLTB - Evelyn C. Mantilla". Andrejkoymasky.com. 2004-08-04. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  12. ^ "Looking after Maggie’s farm". ww2.gazette.net. Retrieved 2014-06-10. 
  13. ^ "Minnesota Legislators Past & Present - Legislator Record - Clark, Karen J". Leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved 2010-07-20. 
  14. ^ Mary Gonzalez comes out as pansexual. Dallas Voice, October 10, 2012.
  15. ^ "Vice Speaker Benjamin J. Cruz". Benjamin J. Cruz. Retrieved 2012-04-27. 
  16. ^ "Marlene Pray Becomes First Openly Bisexual Office Holder In PA - Amplify". Amplifyyourvoice.org. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  17. ^ "Marlene Pray resigns from Doylestown Council - phillyburbs.com: Doylestown". phillyburbs.com. 2013-03-19. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  18. ^ "Hundreds celebrate gay marriage decision in Davenport". Qctimes.com. 2009-04-03. Retrieved 2013-12-03. 
  19. ^ Knich, Diane (March 8, 2013). "Condon announces she’s gay, and wants to clear up inaccuracies posted on a website". The Post and Courier. Retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  20. ^ Harrison, James (March 5, 2013). "Chris Anderson defeats Manny Rico in District 7". Nooga.com. Retrieved 2013-03-06. 
  21. ^ Stahl, Lori (July 2, 1994). "McDaniel aware of what it means to be gay and elected". Dallas Morning News. 
  22. ^ Zimmerman, Bonnie (2000). Lesbian histories and cultures: an encyclopedia. New York: Garland Publishing. p. 258. 
  23. ^ "Rasmussen kicks-off campaign for re-election to Seattle City Council". SGN.org. Seattle Gay News. 11 May 2007. Retrieved 2011-11-09. 
  24. ^ "Out gay man wins race for Fond du Lac City Council". Wisconsin Gazette. April 5, 2013. Retrieved 2013-04-07. 
  25. ^ (Spanish)"Homosexual gana por primera vez unas elecciones en la Isla". El Nuevo Día. November 7, 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  26. ^ Dylan Scott (24 September 2013). "Senate Confirms First Openly Gay Federal Appeals Court Judge". Talking Points Memo. 
  27. ^ "The Hon. Benjamin J.F. Cruz". Unified Courts of Guam. Retrieved 2012-04-27. 
  28. ^ "Corruption/human%20trafficking%20in%20alaska/JUDGE%20WATCHES%20REPUTATION%20SLIDE%20INTO%20SEAMY%20SEX%20TRIAL_Anchorag". nonprof.com. Retrieved 2014-06-10.