List of the most common U.S. county name etymologies

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This is a list of the most common U.S. county names, specifically the names with five or more counties sharing the name.

Washington County (31 counties)[edit]

All of the Washington Counties in the United States are named for George Washington, first President of the United States.

Jefferson County (26 counties)[edit]

Twenty three of the twenty six Jefferson Counties in the United States are directly named for Thomas Jefferson, the third President, and the remaining three are indirectly named for him.

Franklin County (25 counties)[edit]

Twenty three of the twenty five Franklin Counties in the United States are named for Benjamin Franklin, the famous Founding Father, printer, scientist, philosopher, and diplomat.

Jackson County (24 counties)[edit]

Twenty one of the twenty four Jackson Counties in the United States are named for Andrew Jackson, the seventh President.

Lincoln County (24 counties)[edit]

Sixteen (possibly seventeen) of the twenty four Lincoln Counties in the United States are named for Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President; five other Lincoln counties are named for Benjamin Lincoln, a leading general in the American Revolutionary War and distant relative of Abraham.

Madison County (20 counties)[edit]

Eighteen of the twenty Madison Counties in the United States are named for James Madison, the fourth President, and one of the two exceptions is indirectly named for him.

Clay County (18 counties)[edit]

Fifteen of the eighteen Clay Counties in the United States are named for Henry Clay, the Kentucky statesman. One of the three exceptions is in Kentucky.

Greene County and variants (17 counties)[edit]

All Greene Counties in the United States are named after Nathanael Greene, a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

Two Green Counties, despite the difference in spelling, are also named after the aforementioned Nathanael Greene.

One other county may have been named after Greene, although there is evidence that it was instead named for Richard Grenville, leader of the settlement on Roanoke Island.

Montgomery County (18 counties)[edit]

Most (at least 13 out of 18) Montgomery Counties in the United States are named after Richard Montgomery, a major general in the Continental Army killed in the 1775 Battle of Quebec.

Union County (18 counties)[edit]

Fayette and Lafayette Counties (17 counties)[edit]

Despite the difference in name, all of these counties (including one Louisiana parish) are named after the same individual—Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, a French general who played a major role in the American Revolutionary War.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Benjamin C. Franklin." Handbook of Texas Online. [1]. Accessed June 7, 2010.