List of towns in Alberta

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Distribution of Alberta's 108 towns and 11 other communities that meet the legislated population requirements for town status

A town is an urban municipality status type used in the Canadian Province of Alberta. Alberta towns are created when communities with populations of at least 1,000 people, where a majority of their buildings are on parcels of land smaller than 1,850 m², apply to Alberta Municipal Affairs for town status under the authority of the Municipal Government Act.[1] Applications for town status are approved via orders in council made by the Lieutenant Governor in Council under recommendation from the Minister of Municipal Affairs.[1]

Alberta has 108 towns that had a cumulative population of 451,845 and an average population of 4,184 in the 2011 Census.[2] Alberta's largest and smallest towns are Okotoks and Granum with populations of 24,511 and 447 respectively.[2]

When a town's population exceeds 10,000 people, the council may request a change to city status, but the change in incorporated status is not mandatory.[3] Towns with populations less than 1,000, whether their populations have declined below 1,000 or they were incorporated as towns prior to the minimum 1,000 population requirement, are permitted to retain town status.

716 elected town officials (108 mayors and 608 councillors) provide town governance throughout the province.[4]

The highest frequency of towns in Alberta is found in the Queen Elizabeth II Highway/Highway 2A corridor between Calgary and Edmonton corridor including, from south to north, Crossfield, Carstairs, Didsbury, Olds, Bowden, Innisfail, Penhold, Blackfalds, Ponoka and Millet.

Administration[edit]

Pursuant to Part 5, Division 1 of the Municipal Government Act (MGA), each municipality created under the authority of the MGA is governed by a council. As a requirement of the MGA, a town council consists of an odd number of councillors, one of which is the town's chief elected official (CEO) or mayor. A town council consists of seven councillors by default, but it can consist of a higher or lower odd number if council passes a bylaw altering its size (so long as it does not consist of fewer than three councillors).[1] For the 2013-2017 term, 88 towns have a council of seven, and 20 have a council of five.[5]

Town councils are governed by a mayor and an even number of councillors that are elected by popular vote, resulting in a total odd number of members to avoid tie votes on council matters.[1] All council members are elected under the provisions of the Local Authorities Election Act (LAEA).[6] Mayoral or councillor candidates are required to be residents of their municipality for a minimum of six consecutive months prior to nomination day. The last municipal election was October 21, 2013.

Alberta Municipal Affairs, a ministry of the Cabinet of Alberta, is charged with coordination of all levels of local government.

Administrative duties of towns include public safety, local transit, roads, water service, drainage and waste collection, as well as coordination of infrastructure with provincial and regional authorities (including road construction, education, and health).

List[edit]

The below table is a list of only those urban municipalities in Alberta that are incorporated as towns.

The municipalities of Crowsnest Pass and Jasper are not listed because they are incorporated as specialized municipalities, not towns. For more information on specialized municipalities, see Specialized municipalities of Alberta.

Name Specialized/rural
municipality[7]
Incorporation
date (town)[8]
Municipal
census
population
(year)[9]
Population
(2011)[10]
Population
(2006)[10]
Change
(%)[10]
Land
area
(km²)[10]
Population
density
(per km²)[10]
Athabasca[N 1] Athabasca County September 19, 1911 2,990 2,580 15.9 17.48 171.1
Banff Improvement District No. 9 (Banff) January 1, 1990 7,251[N 2]
(2011)
7,584 6,700 13.2 4.88 1,555.0
Barrhead Barrhead No. 11, County of November 26, 1946 4,432 4,209 5.3 8.10 547.2
Bashaw Camrose County May 1, 1964 873 796 9.7 2.84 306.9
Bassano Newell, County of January 16, 1911 1,282 1,345 −4.7 5.16 248.6
Beaumont Leduc County January 1, 1980 14,916
(2013)
13,284 8,961 48.2 10.50 1,264.8
Beaverlodge Grande Prairie No. 1, County of January 24, 1956 2,365 2,264 4.5 5.58 424.0
Bentley Lacombe County January 1, 2001 1,073 1,083 −0.9 2.30 466.3
Black Diamond Foothills No. 31, M.D. of January 1, 1956 2,373 1,900 24.9 3.21 740.3
Blackfalds Lacombe County April 1, 1980 7,275
(2013)
6,300 4,618 36.4 16.36 385.0
Bon Accord Sturgeon County November 20, 1979 1,488 1,534 −3.0 2.11 706.2
Bonnyville Bonnyville No. 87, M.D. of February 3, 1948 6,837
(2012)
6,216 5,832 6.6 14.10 440.7
Bow Island Forty Mile No. 8, County of February 1, 1912 2,025 1,790 13.1 5.92 342.1
Bowden Red Deer County September 1, 1981 1,241 1,210 2.6 2.73 454.7
Bruderheim Lamont County September 17, 1980 1,298
(2012)
1,155 1,215 −4.9 4.23 273.2
Calmar Leduc County January 19, 1954 1,970 1,959 0.6 4.65 423.7
Canmore Bighorn No. 8, M.D. of
Kananaskis Improvement District[11]
June 1, 1966 12,317
(2011)
12,288 12,039 2.1 68.90 178.4
Cardston Cardston County July 2, 1901 3,580 3,452 3.7 8.64 414.1
Carstairs Mountain View County September 1, 1966 3,442 2,699 27.5 11.53 298.4
Castor Paintearth No. 18, County of June 27, 1910 932 931 0.1 2.72 343.1
Chestermere[N 3] Rocky View County March 1, 1993 15,762
(2013)
14,824 9,923 49.4 32.64 454.1
Claresholm Willow Creek No. 26, M.D. of August 31, 1905 3,758 3,700 1.6 9.08 414.0
Coaldale Lethbridge County January 7, 1952 7,526
(2013)
7,493 6,177 21.3 7.95 942.8
Coalhurst Lethbridge County June 1, 1995 2,301
(2013)
1,963 1,523 28.9 2.39 820.3
Cochrane Rocky View County February 15, 1971 18,750
(2013)
17,580 13,760 27.8 30.03 585.5
Coronation Paintearth No. 18, County of April 29, 1912 947 1,015 −6.7 3.73 253.6
Crossfield Rocky View County August 1, 1980 2,853 2,668 6.9 11.87 240.3
Daysland Flagstaff County April 2, 1907 807 818 −1.3 1.75 461.2
Devon Leduc County February 24, 1950 6,510 6,261 4.0 11.72 555.6
Didsbury Mountain View County September 27, 1906 4,957 4,305 15.1 16.08 308.2
Drayton Valley Brazeau County February 1, 1957 7,049 6,893 2.3 12.27 574.3
Drumheller[N 4] Kneehill County
Special Area No. 2
Starland County
Wheatland County[12]
March 2, 1916
January 1, 1998
8,029 7,932 1.2 107.93 74.4
Eckville Lacombe County July 1, 1966 1,125 951 18.3 1.58 710.8
Edson Yellowhead County September 21, 1911 8,646
(2012)
8,475 8,098 4.7 29.58 286.5
Elk Point St. Paul No. 19, County of January 1, 1962 1,571
(2012)
1,412 1,487 −5.0 4.88 289.1
Fairview Fairview No. 136, M.D. of April 25, 1949 3,162 3,297 −4.1 11.30 279.8
Falher Smoky River No. 130, M.D. of January 1, 1955 1,075 941 14.2 2.87 374.7
Fort Macleod[N 5] Willow Creek No. 26, M.D. of March 29, 1912 3,117 3,072 1.5 23.34 133.5
Fox Creek Greenview No. 16, M.D. of September 1, 1983 2,112
(2013)
1,969 2,278 −13.6 11.54 170.6
Gibbons Sturgeon County April 1, 1977 3,030 2,642 14.7 7.39 409.9
Grande Cache Greenview No. 16, M.D. of September 1, 1983 4,319 3,783 14.2 35.48 121.7
Granum[N 6] Willow Creek No. 26, M.D. of November 7, 1910 447 415 7.7 1.87 239.6
Grimshaw Peace No. 135, M.D. of February 2, 1953 2,515 2,537 −0.9 7.21 349.0
Hanna Special Area No. 2 April 14, 1914 2,673 2,847 −6.1 8.56 312.4
Hardisty Flagstaff County November 9, 1910 639 760 −15.9 5.48 116.6
High Level Mackenzie County September 1, 1983 3,641 3,887 −6.3 31.99 113.8
High Prairie Big Lakes, M.D. of January 10, 1950 2,600 2,785 −6.6 7.92 328.2
High River Foothills No. 31, M.D. of February 12, 1906 12,920 10,716 20.6 14.27 905.5
Hinton Yellowhead County December 29, 1958 9,640 9,738 −1.0 33.77 285.4
Innisfail Red Deer County November 20, 1903 7,922
(2012)
7,876 7,331 7.4 19.53 403.2
Irricana Rocky View County June 9, 2005 1,162 1,243 −6.5 3.18 364.9
Killam Flagstaff County May 1, 1965 981 1,019 −3.7 4.53 216.3
Lamont Lamont County May 31, 1968 1,753 1,669 5.0 9.27 189.2
Legal Sturgeon County January 1, 1998 1,225 1,192 2.8 3.22 381.0
Magrath Cardston County July 24, 1907 2,376
(2013)
2,217 2,081 6.5 4.97 446.2
Manning Northern Lights, County of January 1, 1957 1,164 1,493 −22.0 3.42 340.0
Mayerthorpe Lac Ste. Anne County March 20, 1961 1,398 1,474 −5.2 4.78 292.7
McLennan Smoky River No. 130, M.D. of February 11, 1948 809 824 −1.8 3.58 226.2
Milk River Warner No. 5, County of February 7, 1956 811 816 −0.6 2.39 339.6
Millet Wetaskiwin No. 10, County of September 1, 1983 2,092 2,068 1.2 3.74 558.7
Morinville Sturgeon County April 21, 1911 8,569 6,775 26.5 11.34 755.6
Mundare Lamont County January 4, 1951 855 712 20.1 4.20 203.6
Nanton Willow Creek No. 26, M.D. of August 9, 1907 2,132 2,055 3.7 4.80 443.9
Okotoks Foothills No. 31, M.D. of June 1, 1904 26,319
(2013)
24,511 17,150 42.9 19.24 1,273.8
Olds Mountain View County July 1, 1905 8,511
(2013)
8,235 7,253 13.5 14.87 553.8
Onoway Lac Ste. Anne County September 1, 2005 1,039 875 18.7 3.34 311.5
Oyen Special Area No. 3 September 1, 1965 1,070
(2012)
973 1,015 −4.1 4.93 197.4
Peace River[N 7] Northern Lights, County of
Northern Sunrise County
Peace No. 135, M.D. of[13]
December 1, 1919 6,729 6,315 6.6 25.92 259.6
Penhold Red Deer County September 1, 1980 2,476
(2012)
2,375 1,971 20.5 5.33 445.3
Picture Butte Lethbridge County January 1, 1960 1,650 1,592 3.6 2.90 569.5
Pincher Creek Pincher Creek No. 9, M.D. of May 12, 1906 3,619
(2013)
3,685 3,625 1.7 10.19 361.6
Ponoka Ponoka County October 15, 1904 6,773 6,576 3.0 13.05 519.2
Provost Provost No. 52, M.D. of December 29, 1952 2,041 2,072 −1.5 4.93 413.8
Rainbow Lake Mackenzie County September 1, 1995 870 965 −9.8 11.04 78.8
Raymond Warner No. 5, County of July 1, 1903 3,982
(2013)
3,743 3,225 16.1 6.85 546.1
Redcliff Cypress County August 5, 1912 5,588 5,116 9.2 16.20 344.9
Redwater Sturgeon County December 31, 1950 2,116
(2012)
1,915 2,202 −13.0 20.12 95.2
Rimbey Ponoka County December 13, 1948 2,378 2,252 5.6 11.34 209.7
Rocky Mountain House Clearwater County August 31, 1939 7,300
(2012)
6,933 6,874 0.9 12.99 533.6
Sedgewick Flagstaff County May 1, 1966 857 891 −3.8 2.60 329.1
Sexsmith Grande Prairie No. 1, County of October 15, 1979 2,418 1,969 22.8 13.43 180.1
Slave Lake Lesser Slave River No. 124, M.D. of August 2, 1965 6,782 6,703 1.2 14.18 478.4
Smoky Lake Smoky Lake County February 1, 1962 1,022 1,010 1.2 4.20 243.5
Spirit River Spirit River No. 133, M.D. of September 18, 1951 1,025 1,148 −10.7 2.81 365.4
St. Paul[N 8] St. Paul No. 19, County of December 15, 1936 5,844
(2012)
5,400 5,106 5.8 7.89 684.7
Stavely Willow Creek No. 26, M.D. of May 25, 1912 505 435 16.1 1.62 311.3
Stettler Stettler No. 6, County of November 23, 1906 5,748 5,445 5.6 13.12 438.2
Stony Plain Parkland County December 10, 1908 15,051 12,363 21.7 35.61 422.7
Strathmore Wheatland County July 6, 1911 12,352
(2012)
12,305 10,280 19.7 27.28 451.0
Sundre Mountain View County January 1, 1956 2,695
(2012)
2,610 2,523 3.4 11.16 233.9
Swan Hills Big Lakes, M.D. of January 1, 1967 1,465 1,645 −10.9 25.44 57.6
Sylvan Lake Red Deer County May 20, 1946 13,015
(2013)
12,327 10,250 20.3 15.62 789.4
Taber Taber, M.D. of July 1, 1907 8,104 7,591 6.8 15.09 537.2
Three Hills Kneehill County January 1, 1929 3,230
(2012)
3,198 3,089 3.5 5.63 567.8
Tofield Beaver County September 10, 1909 2,182 1,876 16.3 8.17 267.1
Trochu Kneehill County August 1, 1962 1,072 1,005 6.7 2.82 380.1
Turner Valley Foothills No. 31, M.D. of September 1, 1977 2,167 1,908 13.6 5.45 397.6
Two Hills Two Hills No. 21, County of January 1, 1955 1,431
(2012)
1,379 1,047 31.7 3.31 416.3
Valleyview Greenview No. 16, M.D. of February 5, 1957 1,972
(2013)
1,761 1,725 2.1 9.66 182.2
Vauxhall Taber, M.D. of January 1, 1961 1,288 1,069 20.5 2.88 447.6
Vegreville Minburn No. 27, County of August 15, 1906 5,758
(2012)
5,717 5,519 3.6 13.92 410.6
Vermilion Vermilion River, County of August 27, 1906 4,545
(2012)
3,930 4,036 −2.6 13.69 287.0
Viking Beaver County November 10, 1952 1,041 1,085 −4.1 3.76 277.1
Vulcan Vulcan County June 15, 1921 1,836 1,940 −5.4 6.58 279.0
Wainwright Wainwright No. 61, M.D. of July 14, 1910 6,289
(2013)
5,925 5,426 9.2 8.91 665.4
Wembley Grande Prairie No. 1, County of August 1, 1980 1,410
(2012)
1,383 1,443 −4.2 4.54 304.8
Westlock Westlock County January 7, 1947 4,823 5,008 −3.7 13.57 355.3
Whitecourt Woodlands County December 20, 1971 10,574
(2013)
9,605 8,971 7.1 26.14 367.4
Total towns 451,830 404,662 11.7 1,273.68 354.7

New towns[edit]

New town is a former urban municipal status in Alberta that is no longer in use. The authority to incorporate a community as a new town came from The New Towns Act, which was chapter 39 of the Statutes of Alberta, 1956.

At least 11 communities incorporated as a new town between 1956 and 1967. After only six months of incorporation as a village, Drayton Valley was the first community in Alberta to incorporate as a new town on June 1, 1956.[14] Drayton Valley was also the community that operated under new town status for the shortest period – eight months from June 1, 1956 to February 1, 1957.[15]

The last community to incorporate as a new town was Fox Creek on July 19, 1967.[16] Fox Creek was previously unincorporated prior to this date. It remained a new town for just over sixteen years until September 1, 1983 when it changed to town status.[17]

Rainbow Lake was the last community to be recognized as a new town. Its status was changed to that of a town in 1994 when numerous former acts under the authority of Alberta Municipal Affairs were transitioned into the current Municipal Government Act.[18] Rainbow Lake was also the community that operated under new town status for the longest period – nearly 28 years from September 1, 1966 to May 2, 1994.

Other communities that applied for new town status included Slave Lake and Smith. Slave Lake applied, despite already being incorporated, to access additional provincial funding but the application was denied by the provincial cabinet. In the case of Smith, after applying in 1968, its application was denied after the province's feasibility study for the community determined Smith was unlikely to attract further economic development.[19]

Below is a list of the 11 communities that were once incorporated as a new town. All but one of them are resource communities in northern or west central Alberta and were recently founded communities at their dates of incorporation as new towns. St. Albert was the only community that was not in northern or west central Alberta and had been incorporated as its own municipality since December 7, 1899.[20]

Former new town Incorporation date
(new town)
Previous
status
Subsequent status
change date
Subsequent
status
Drayton Valley June 1, 1956[14] Village February 1, 1957[15] Town
Fort McMurray June 30, 1964[21] Town September 1, 1980[21] City[N 9]
Fox Creek July 19, 1967[16] Unincorporated September 1, 1983[17] Town
Grande Cache September 1, 1966[23] Unincorporated September 1, 1983[24] Town
High Level June 1, 1965[25] Hamlet September 1, 1983[26] Town
Hinton November 1, 1956[27] Hamlet December 29, 1958[28] Town
Lodgepole July 1, 1956[29] Unincorporated March 1, 1970[30] Hamlet[N 10]
Rainbow Lake September 1, 1966[31] Unincorporated May 2, 1994[18] Town
St. Albert January 1, 1957[20] Town July 3, 1962[20] Town[N 11]
Swan Hills September 1, 1959[33] Unincorporated January 1, 1967[34] Town
Whitecourt August 15, 1961[35] Village December 20, 1971[36] Town

Former towns[edit]

All cities in Alberta[37] and the former cities of Fort McMurray[38] and Strathcona[39] previously held town status in their histories. Other communities that previously held town status include Beverly, Big Valley, Blairmore, Bowness, Carmangay, Coleman, Cynthia, Diamond City, Forest Lawn, Gleichen, Grand Centre, Grouard, Irvine, Jasper Place, Lac La Biche, Lodgepole, Montgomery and Youngstown.[38][40] Of these, the villages of Big Valley, Carmangay and Youngstown are the only communities that remain incorporated municipalities.[41] The others either amalgamated to form other municipalities (Blairmore, Coleman, Grand Centre and Lac La Biche),[42][43][44] were absorbed through annexation by Calgary (Bowness, Forest Lawn and Montgomery)[45] or Edmonton (Beverly and Jasper Place)[46] or dissolved to become hamlets under the jurisdiction of municipal districts (Cynthia, Diamond City, Gleichen, Grouard, Irvine and Lodgepole).[7]

Town status eligibility[edit]

The villages of Stirling and Nobleford, with populations of 1,090 and 1,000 respectively,[2] meet the legislated population requirements for town status. There are also at least nine hamletsCardiff, Clairmont, Dunmore, Fort Chipewyan, La Crete, Lac La Biche, Langdon, Springbrook, and Wabasca – that meet the population requirements for town status.

City status eligibility[edit]

There are currently ten towns – Beaumont, Canmore, Chestermere, Cochrane, High River, Okotoks, Stony Plain, Strathmore, Sylvan Lake and Whitecourt – that are eligible for city status having populations in excess of 10,000.[10][47] Of these, Stony Plain is investigating the merits of city status.[48] In 2009, the Town of Hinton expressed interest in incorporating as a city once it surpasses 10,000 people.[49] Its population in 2011 was 9,640.[2]

Gallery[edit]

Towns in Alberta

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Athabasca was formerly known as Athabasca Landing prior to August 4, 1913.[8]
  2. ^ Banff's latest municipal census population of 7,251 does not include a shadow (non-permanent) population of 993 for a total combined population of 8,244.[9]
  3. ^ Chestermere was formerly known as Chestermere Lake prior to March 1, 1993.[8]
  4. ^ Drumheller originally incorporated as a city on April 3, 1930 but reverted from city status as a result of its amalgamation with the M.D. of Badlands No. 7 in 1998.[8]
  5. ^ Fort Macleod was formerly known as Macleod prior to April 1, 1952.[8]
  6. ^ Granum was formerly known as Leavings prior to March 31, 1908.[8]
  7. ^ Peace River was formerly known as Peace River Crossing prior to May 22, 1916.[8]
  8. ^ St. Paul was formerly known as St. Paul de Métis prior to December 15, 1932.
  9. ^ Fort McMurray later dissolved from city status on April 1, 1995 and is now designated as an urban service area.[22]
  10. ^ Lodgepole dissolved as development in Lodgepole "did not materialize sufficiently to qualify under the provisions of the Municipal Government Act for the formation of a town or village."[30]
  11. ^ St. Albert later incorporated as a city on January 1, 1977.[32]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Municipal Government Act". Alberta Queen's Printer. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2012-02-09. 
  3. ^ "Types of Municipalities in Alberta". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  4. ^ "Municipal Profiles (Towns)". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  5. ^ "Municipal Officials Search". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved 2013-12-24. 
  6. ^ "Local Authorities Election Act". Alberta Queen's Printer. Retrieved 2010-03-21. 
  7. ^ a b "Communities Within Specialized and Rural Municipalities". Alberta Municipal Affairs. April 9, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Towns)". Alberta Municipal Affairs. May 17, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "2013 Municipal Affairs Population List" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. November 20, 2013. pp. 3 5. ISBN 978-1-4601-1418-6. Retrieved December 6, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. January 30, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Census Profile - Map : Canmore, Town (Census Subdivision), Alberta". Statistics Canada. March 22, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Census Profile - Map : Drumheller, Town (Census Subdivision), Alberta". Statistics Canada. March 22, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Census Profile - Map : Peace River, Town (Census Subdivision), Alberta". Statistics Canada. March 22, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1956-05-09). "Order in Council (O.C.) 601/56". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  15. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1957-03-11). "Order in Council (O.C.) 403/57". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  16. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1967-07-19). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1405/67". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  17. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1983-01-12). "Order in Council (O.C.) 40/83". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  18. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1994-05-02). "Transitional Provisions, Consequental Amendments, Repeal and Commencement, Transition from Former Acts to this Act". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  19. ^ Jack Masson with Edward C. LeSage Jr. (1994). Alberta's Local Governments: Politics and Democracy. The University of Alberta Press. pp. 91–92. ISBN 0-88864-251-2. 
  20. ^ a b c Arlene Borgstede (1985). "The Black Robe's Vision : A History of St. Albert & District (Volume 2)". St. Albert Historical Society. p. 681. Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  21. ^ a b Order in Council (O.C.) 930/64, Province of Alberta, 1964-06-30 
  22. ^ Province of Alberta (1994-12-21). "Order in Council (O.C.) 817/94". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  23. ^ Province of Alberta (1966-08-30). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1605/66". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  24. ^ Province of Alberta (1983-08-31). "Order in Council (O.C.) 749/83". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  25. ^ Province of Alberta (1965-06-01). "Order in Council (O.C.) 967/65". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  26. ^ Province of Alberta (1983-08-31). "Order in Council (O.C.) 750/83". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  27. ^ Province of Alberta (1956-11-06). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1547/56". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  28. ^ Province of Alberta (1958-11-14). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1661/58". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  29. ^ Province of Alberta (1956-07-31). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1034/56". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  30. ^ a b Province of Alberta (1956-07-31). "Order in Council (O.C.) 325/70". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  31. ^ Province of Alberta (1966-08-30). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1606/66". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  32. ^ Province of Alberta (1976-12-01). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1284/76". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  33. ^ Province of Alberta (1959-08-18). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1242/59". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  34. ^ Province of Alberta (1966-11-15). "Order in Council (O.C.) 2145/66". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  35. ^ Province of Alberta (1961-08-15). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1253/61". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  36. ^ Province of Alberta (1971-11-10). "Order in Council (O.C.) 1917/71". Retrieved 2010-03-13. 
  37. ^ "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Cities)". Alberta Municipal Affairs. January 25, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b "Population Data – 1958". Alberta Municipal Affairs. 1958. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  39. ^ City of Edmonton, Planning and Development Department. History of Annexations (Map).
  40. ^ "Population Data 1935". Alberta Municipal Affairs. 1935. Retrieved January 31, 2013. 
  41. ^ "2013 Municipal Codes". Alberta Municipal Affairs. April 9, 2013. Retrieved May 21, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Municipality of Crowsnest Pass - Location and History Profile". Alberta Municipal Affairs. January 25, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  43. ^ "City of Cold Lake - Location and History Profile". Alberta Municipal Affairs. January 25, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  44. ^ "Lac La Biche County - Location and History Profile". Alberta Municipal Affairs. January 25, 2013. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  45. ^ "Chapter 3: Establishing the Pattern, 1955–1962". Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  46. ^ "Population History". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 1, 2013. 
  47. ^ "Town of Whitecourt, Agenda, Regular Meeting of Council, Monday, June 24, 2013 (Item #4 2013 Municipal Census Results)". Town of Whitecourt. Retrieved June 21, 2013. 
  48. ^ "Council Meeting Highlights". Town of Stony Plain. April 22, 2013. Retrieved May 5, 2013. 
  49. ^ "Town of Hinton Regular Meeting of Council Agenda (see page 113 of 157)". Town of Hinton. 2009-04-21. Retrieved 2009-12-09. 

External links[edit]