List of track gauges

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Track gauges
General concepts
Track gauge · Break-of-gauge ·
Dual gauge · Conversion (list·
Bogie exchange · Variable gauge
By transport mode
Tram · Rapid transit · High-speed rail
Miniature · Scale model
By size (list)
Graphic list of track gauges

Broad
  Brunel 2,140 mm (7 ft 14 in)
  Indian 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in)
  Iberian 1,668 mm (5 ft 5 2132 in)
  Irish and
Pennsylvania trolley
1,600 mm
1,588 mm
1,581 mm
(5 ft 3 in)
(5 ft 2 12 in)
(5 ft 2 14 in)
  Russian 1,524 mm
1,520 mm
(5 ft)
(4 ft 11 2732 in)

  Standard 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)

Narrow
  Scotch 1,372 mm (4 ft 6 in)
  Cape, CAP, Kyōki 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in)
  Metre 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 38 in)
  Three foot, 900 mm,
and Swedish three foot
914 mm
900 mm
891 mm
(3 ft)
(2 ft 11 716)
(2 ft11 332) in)
  Two foot six inch,
Bosnian, and 750 mm
762 mm
760 mm
750 mm
(2 ft 6 in)
(2 ft 5 1516 in)
(2 ft 5 12 in)
  Two foot and 600 mm 610 mm
603 mm
600 mm
597 mm
(2 ft)
(1 ft 11 34 in)
(1 ft 11 58 in)
(1 ft 11 12 in)

Minimum
  Fifteen-inch 381 mm (15 in)
By location
North America · South America · Europe
World map, rail gauge by region

This article contains a list of railway track gauges by size as measured between the inner faces of the rails.

Track gauges by size[edit]

Broad gauge[edit]

Gauge Country/territory Notes
Metric
(mm)
Imperial
9,000 29 ft 6 616 in Russia The electric "ship elevator" at the Krasnoyarsk hydroelectric dam[1]
8,200 26 ft 10 5364 in Austria Lärchwandschrägaufzug (de)
5,500 18 ft United Kingdom Magnus Volk's Brighton and Rottingdean Seashore Electric Railway
3,330 10 ft 11 in United Kingdom Dalzell Iron and Steel Works, Motherwell, Lanarkshire.[2]
3,000 9 ft 10 18 in Germany / Russia
2,743 9 ft Japan Lake Biwa Canal, an inclined plane near Kyoto
United States Knoxville Incline, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
2,438 8 ft United States Johnstown Inclined Plane, Johnstown, Pennsylvania
2,286 7 ft 6 in England St Nicholas Cliff Lift, Scarborough
2,140 7 ft 14 in South Africa East London and Table Bay harbour railways
United Kingdom Brunel's Great Western Railway until converted to standard gauge by May 1892,
see Great Western Railway The "gauge war". harbour railways at the Isle of Portland and Brixham (England), Holyhead (Wales).
Isle of Man Port Erin Breakwater Railway.
Portugal (Azores) Ponta Delgada and Horta harbour (using rolling stock from Holyhead harbour)
2,000 6 ft 6 34 in United Kingdom (Scotland) Cairngorm Mountain Railway - Funicular
1,980 6 ft 5 6164 in Israel Haifa, Carmelit subway railway line - Funicular
1,945 6 ft 4 916 in Netherlands
till 1866
1839–1866[3] Hollandsche IJzeren Spoorweg-Maatschappij
1,880 6 ft 2 in Ireland Ulster Railway, 1839–1846, re-gauged to 5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm)
1,829 6 ft India In 19th century, engineers considered this gauge but used 5 ft 6 in (1,676 mm).
Russia Saint Petersburg - Tsarskoe Selo Railway, 1837–1897
United States Albany and Susquehanna Railroad, Erie Railroad until June 22, 1880
1,800 5 ft 10 78 in Germany Oberweißbacher Bergbahn (de) (funicular section only)[4]
1,750[5] 5 ft 878 in France Ligne de Sceaux Paris to Limours via Saint-Rémy-lès-Chevreuse, until 1891
1,676 5 ft 6 in
1,672 5 ft 5 1316 in
(6 Castilian feet)
Spain Converted to 1,668 mm/​5 ft 5 2132 in (Iberian gauge) from 1955;[6] L1
1,668 5 ft 5 2132 in
1,664 5 ft 5 12 in
(5 Portuguese feet)
Portugal Converted to 1,668 mm/​5 ft 5 2132 in (Iberian gauge) from 1955[6]
1,638 5 ft 4 12 in United States Baltimore, Baltimore Streetcar System (defunct)[3]
1,613 5 ft 3 12 in United States Sacramento Valley Railroad (1852–77)
1,600 5 ft 3 in
1,588 5 ft 2 12 in United States Pennsylvania trolley gauge[7]
1,575 5 ft 2 in Ireland Dublin and Drogheda Railway, 1844–1846, converted to 5 ft 3 in (1,600 mm) Irish gauge
United States Columbus Ohio streetcar[8]
1,537 5 ft 12 in United Kingdom London and Blackwall Railway 1840-49, converted to standard gauge
1,524 5 ft
1,520 4 ft 11 2732 in
1,511 4 ft 11 12 in Ukraine Kiev tram - gradually converted to 1,524 mm (5 ft), 1920s.
1,495 4 ft 10 78 in Canada Toronto subway, Toronto streetcar system, Toronto radial lines, Halton County Radial Railway (heritage railway)
1,492 4 ft 10 34 in Canada Toronto Suburban Railway from 1891 - 1917. 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) until the end at 1931
1,473 4 ft 10 in United States The Midwest, until after the Civil War (Ohio gauge)
1,458 4 ft 9 1332 in Germany Trams in Leipzig
1,450 4 ft 9 332 in Germany Dresdner Verkehrsbetriebe AG
1,448 4 ft 9 in England Manchester and Leeds Railway
United States Danville, Hazleton and Wilkes-Barre Railroad
1,445 4 ft 8 78 in Italy Tramway networks in Milan, Turin and Rome; Orvieto Funicular; railway network until 1930.
Spain Madrid Metro

Standard gauge - 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)[edit]

Narrow gauge[edit]

Railways with a track gauge less than 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge and more than 500 mm (19 34 in) minimum gauge.

Gauge Country/territory Notes
Metric
(mm)
Imperial
1,432[9] 4 ft 838 in Hong Kong Disneyland Resort Line, Island Line (including West Island Line), Kwun Tong Line (including Kwun Tong Line Extension), Tseung Kwan O Line, Tsuen Wan Line, Tung Chung Line
1,422 4 ft 8 in United States Centreville Military Railroad; Green Mountain Cog Railway; Manassas Gap Railroad; Mount Washington Cog Railway
England prior to 1846 (proto standard gauge)
1,416 4 ft 7 34 in England Huddersfield Corporation Tramways
Scotland List of town tramway systems in Scotland
1,397 4 ft 7 in Wales Duffryn Llynvi and Porthcawl Railway
1,384 4 ft 6 12 in Scotland various railways in Scotland prior to 1840
1,372 4 ft 6 in
1,350 4 ft 5 532 in Brazil Santos tramways (closed 1971)[10] and later Santos heritage tramways (1984–86 and 2000–present)[11]
1,333 4 ft 4 12 in England Belvoir Castle Tramway[12]
1,300 4 ft 3 316 in Funiculars of Lyon (Lyon, France); Reisszug (Salzburg, Austria)
1,295 4 ft 3 in United States Delaware and Hudson Canal Company Gravity Railroad
1,270 4 ft 2 in England and Wales Surrey Iron Railway, Merthyr Tramroad, Rumney Railway
1,245 4 ft 1 in England Middleton Railway, converted to standard gauge after 1881
1,219 4 ft England Furzebrook Railway (c.1830–1957), Redruth and Chasewater Railway 1826–1915,
Bradford City Tramway, Keighley Tramway and a cluster in the NW of England
New Zealand Wellington tramway system: electric trams, closed 1964.
Scotland Falkirk and District Tramways (1905–1936), Glasgow Subway
United States Former tram systems in Canton, Ohio; Honolulu, Hawaii; Laredo, Texas; Pueblo, Colorado; San Antonio, Texas.
Wales Padarn Railway (1842–1961), Saundersfoot Railway 1829–1939
1,217 3 ft 11 78 in Sweden Four lines, all converted to standard gauge before 1900, still in use. 1217 mm is based on Swedish feet
but compatible with locomotives of 1,219 mm (4 ft). See sv:1217 mm (Swedish)
1,200 3 ft 11 14 in China, Switzerland Chaoyang Commuter Rail, Chaoyang District, Shantou;
Bergbahn Rheineck-Walzenhausen (a funicular converted to a cog railway. Only one EMU-1)
1,188 3 ft 10 34 in Sweden
1,168 3 ft 10 in United States (Puerto Rico) El Conquistador Resort
1,156 3 ft 9 12 in United States Arcata and Mad River Railroad
1,143 3 ft 9 in England Lynton and Lynmouth Cliff Railway
1,120 3 ft 8 in England Severn and Wye Railway prior to 1868
1,106 3 ft 7 12 in Austria From Gmunden in the Salzkammergut to Budweis, now in the Czech Republic.
1,100 3 ft 7 716 in Brazil The Santa Teresa Tramway in Rio de Janeiro
Germany Braunschweig tram system; tram systems in Kiel and Lübeck, closed
Italy Former SVIE (Società Varesina per Imprese Elettriche) network around Varese, circa 1903–1955
1,093 3 ft 7 in England Swinefleet Works
Sweden Köping-Uttersberg-Riddarhyttan Railway, 1864–1968. The gauge was by mistake.
1,067 3 ft 6 in
1,055 3 ft 5 12 in Algeria National Company for Rail Transport
1,050 3 ft 5 1132 in Jordan Hejaz railway
Syria
Lebanon & Syria former Beyrouth – Damascus Railway, in Lebanon mostly dismantled
Israel & Saudi Arabia dismantled parts of Hejaz railway
1,040 3 ft 5 in Austria Festungsbahn (Salzburg)
1,029 3 ft 4 34 in England Lake Lock Rail Road
1,029 3 ft 4 12 in England Herne Bay Pier Railway
1,016 3 ft 4 in Scotland Kilmarnock and Troon Railway
United States Coal Hill Coal Railroad, Keeling Coal Company, Pittsburgh and Castle Shannon Plane, Pittsburgh and Castle Shannon Railroad, Wildlife Express Train (located in Disney's Animal Kingdom)
1,009 3 ft 3 2332 in Bulgaria Sofia Tramway
1,000 3 ft 3 38 in
985 3 ft 2 2532 in Switzerland Zugerbergbahn funicular
965 3 ft 2 in England Clifton Rocks Railway
United States Birmingham Coal Company Railroad, Detroit, Bay City & Alpena Railroad
950 3 ft 1 38 in Italy Cagliari light rail, Circumvesuviana, Dolomites Railway, Ferrovia Circumetnea, Ferrovie della Sardegna, Metrosassari, Rome–Giardinetti railway, Rome–Fiuggi railway
Eritrea Eritrean Railway
Libya Italian Libya Railways
Somalia Mogadishu-Villabruzzi Railway
946 3 ft 1 14 in Austria Gletscherbahn Kaprun 2, a funicular partly inside a tunnel.
943 3 ft 1 18 in England Central Electricity Generating Board Fawley Tunnel[13]
925 3 ft  1332 in Germany Trams in Chemnitz, since in 1914
914 3 ft
900 2 ft 11 716 in
891 2 ft 11 332 in (3 Swedish feet) Sweden
889 2 ft 11 in England Miller Engineering & Construction Ltd. Sandiacre depot[14]
Germany Schlebusch-Harkorter coal railway in Westphalia
880 2 ft 10 4164 in Germany Peat railway Grassau - Rottau in Bavaria
Norway Industrial railway in Stokke
850 2 ft 9 1532 in Italy Ponte Tresa-Luino (1924: converted to 1,100 mm/​3 ft 7 716 in gauge, 1950: closed)

Menaggio-Porlezza (1939: closed)

838 2 ft 9 in United Kingdom formerly Volk's Electric Railway
825 2 ft 8 12 in Volk's Electric Railway
820 2 ft 8 932 in Germany Wuppertal-Vohwinkel–Essen-Überruhr railway, converted
813 2 ft 8 in England Winnal Gasworks Railway[15]
802 2 ft 7 916 in Sweden Far behind 891 mm (2 ft 11 332 in), one of the most common narrow gauges in Sweden, for example the
Hällefors–Fredriksbergs Järnvägar (sv) (1874–1970) in Värmland. Never formed much of a network, none remain.
800 2 ft 7 12 in Norway Mågelibanen
Switzerland Numerous rack and mountain railways
Wales Snowdon Mountain Railway
United States Fontana Dam
791 2 ft 7 964 in Denmark Faxe Jernbane in southern Zealand
785 2 ft 6 2932 in
(2 12 Prussian feet)
Poland and Germany Bröl Valley Railway
775 2 ft 6 3364 in Germany Bomberg railway, a funicular in Bad Pyrmont
765 2 ft 6 18 in Democratic Republic of Congo Matadi–Kinshasa Railway, converted to 3 ft 6 in (1,067 mm) 1925–1931.[16]
762 2 ft 6 in
760 2 ft 5 1516 in
(12 Austrian fathom)
Austria and Bosnia
750 2 ft 5 12 in
740 2 ft 5 964 in Luxembourg Minière et Métallurgique de Rodange mine railway
737 2 ft 5 in England St. Michael's Mount Tramway[17]
724 2 ft 4 12 in Wales Glyn Valley Tramway
711 2 ft 4 in England Snailbeach District Railways
700 2 ft 3 12 in Denmark Standard gauge for sugar beet railways; none remain.
England Biwater Pipes and Castings[18]
France Chemin de fer d'Abreschviller
Indonesia Used by 36 sugar mill in Java, only 23 in use.
Latvia Used in some peat railways
Netherlands Used in industrial, peat, and field railways
693 2 ft 3 932 in Sweden Industrial railway in Borlänge
686 2 ft 3 in
660 2 ft 2 in Germany Industrial and mine railways in Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate
Wales Some internal tramways of the defunct Cwt y Bugail Quarry
655 2 ft 1 2532 in Germany Schlebusch-Harkorter Coal Railway
630 2 ft  5164 in Germany Brickworks in Zehdenick
622 2 ft  12 in Wales Penrhyn Quarry Railway until 1879
620 2 ft  1332 in Slovenia Cave railway in the Postojna Cave
610 2 ft
603 1 ft 11 34 in
600 1 ft 11 58 in
597 1 ft 11 12 in
580 1 ft 10 5364 in Austria Wolfsegg Traunthaler Kohlenwerke in Ampflwang im Hausruckwald
578 1 ft 10 34 in United States Lakeside Amusement Park
Wales Penrhyn Quarry Railway
575 1 ft 10 4164 in Germany Iron ore mine railways in Bad Ems and Ramsbeck
560 1 ft 10 364 in Germany Salt mine railway in Berchtesgaden
558 1 ft 9 3132 in Dominican Republic Transport in the Dominican Republic
550 1 ft 9 2132 in Germany Mine railways in Mayen
533 21 in England Pleasure Beach Express
520 1 ft 8 12 in Sweden Industrial railway at Sandviken
508 20 in United Kingdom Great Woburn Railway
United States Confusion Hill

Minimum gauge, ridable miniature railways, and other extreme narrow gauges[edit]

This section contains the overlapping ridable miniature railway and minimum gauge definitions, as well as other extreme narrow gauges. See: Distinction between a ridable miniature railway and a minimum gauge railway for clarification.

Model railway gauges are covered in rail transport modelling scales.

Gauge Country/territory Notes
Metric
(mm)
Imperial
500 19 34 in Austria Geriatriezentrum Am Wienerwald Feldbahn
Argentina Tren del Fin del Mundo, Ushuaia - Parque Nacional Tierra del Fuego
France Several Decauville portable railways, Chemin de Fer Touristique du Tarn, Petit train d'Artouste
483 19 in Isle of Man Great Laxey Mine Railway
United States Swanton Pacific Railroad
457 18 in United Kingdom Crewe Works Railway, Royal Arsenal Railway, Sand Hutton Light Railway, Steeple Grange Light Railway
United States Billy Jones Wildcat Railroad
450 17 2332 in Czech Republic Industrial railways[19]
419 16 12 in Canada 16 12 in (419 mm) gauge ridable miniature railway
England Berkhamsted Gasworks Railway[20]
406 16 in United States 16 in (406 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
400 15 34 in France Agricultural field railways (Decauville portable track)
381 15 in
356 14 in United States 14 in (356 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways, Chicago Tunnel Company (during construction process)
311 12 14 in United Kingdom Fairbourne Railway
305 12 in 12 in (305 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
260 10 14 in 10 14 in (260 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
England Railway built by minimum gauge pioneer Sir Arthur Heywood, abandoned in favor of 15 in (381 mm) gauge.
241 9 12 in 9 12 in (241 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
240 9 716 in 9 716 in (240 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
229 9 in 9 in (229 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
210 8 14 in 8 14 in (210 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
190.5 7 12 in 7 12 in (190.5 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
184 7 14 in 7 14 in (184 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
127 5 in 5 in (127 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
121 4 34 in 4 34 in (121 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways
89 3 12 in 3 12 in (89 mm) gauge ridable miniature railways

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Boat lift Krasnoyarsk hydroelectric power station on the Yen
  2. ^ Jones, Robin. Britain's Wierdest Railways. Horncastle: Morton's Media Ltd. p. 13. ISBN 978-1-906167-25-7. 
  3. ^ a b "Railroad Gauge Width". Паровоз ИС. Российский железнодорожный портал. Archived from the original on July 17, 2012. Retrieved 2007-11-29. 
  4. ^ Rieger, Bernhard (2006-04-23). "Breitspurbahn". Retrieved 2007-11-29. 
  5. ^ "Écartement des rails". fr.wikipedia (in French). 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2007-11-29. 
  6. ^ a b 1955
  7. ^ George W. Hilton,John Fitzgerald Due - The Electric Interurban Railways in America, page 51
  8. ^ Campbell, Alex (2007). "Track Gauge". Retrieved 2008-04-04. 
  9. ^ [1]
  10. ^ Morrison, Allen (1989). The Tramways of Brazil: A 130-Year Survey. New York: Bonde Press. pp. 134–138. ISBN 0-9622348-1-8. 
  11. ^ Morrison, Allen (November 1, 2010). "The Tramways of Latin America in 2010". Retrieved 2010-11-09.
  12. ^ "Narrow Gauge Railway Museum article on Belvoir Castle Tramway". 
  13. ^ Mitchell, Vic and Smith, Keith (2004). Hampshire Narrow Gauge including the Isle of Wight. Middleton Press. ISBN 1-904474-36-5. 
  14. ^ Bryant, R.S. (ed.) (1987). Industrial Locomotives, including preserved and minor railway locomotives. Industrial Railway Society. ISBN 0-901096-55-5. 
  15. ^ Mitchell, Vic and Smith, Keith (2004). Hampshire Narrow Gauge including the Isle of Wight. Middleton Press. ISBN 1-904474-36-5. 
  16. ^ Neil Robinson: World Rail Atlas and Historical Summary 7. North, East and Central Africa. 2009.
  17. ^ Dart, Maurice (2005). Cornwall Narrow Gauge including the Camborne & Redruth tramway. Middleton Press. ISBN 1-904474-56-X. 
  18. ^ "List of 2 ft gauge railways worldwide". [dead link]
  19. ^ Track gauge by size From Czech wiki
  20. ^ Nicholson, Peter (1975). Industrial Narrow Gauge Railways in Britain. Bradford, Barton. ISBN 0-85153-236-5. 

External links[edit]