List of types of marble

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Marble from Fauske in Norway.

The following is a list of various types of marble according to location. (NB: Marble-like stone which is not true marble according to geologists is included, but is indicated by endnotes).

Africa[edit]

Egypt[edit]

Galala Marble Alabaster Marble

Ethiopia[edit]

Tunisia[edit]

  • Giallo antico — also known as Numidian marble (marmor numidicum in Latin), was a yellow marble quarried in Roman times from the area of Chemtou, ancient Simmithu

Asia[edit]

India[edit]

Turkey[edit]

Europe[edit]

Marble quarry in Naxos, Greece.

Belgium[edit]

British Isles[edit]

Czech Republic[edit]

A stoup from brown Slivenec marble in the church in Dobřichovice

See webpage Dekorační kameny etc.

Croatia[edit]

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Greece[edit]

Italy[edit]

Macedonia[edit]

Norway[edit]

Romania[edit]

Portugal[edit]

Russia[edit]

Spain[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Mideast[edit]

Israel[edit]

Oman[edit]

Omani Limestone/Marble deposits are frequent and recurring in this moutaineous country. The most famous of these Marbles is Desert Beige which is quarried from Ibri Oman.

Palestine[edit]

North America[edit]

Bahamas[edit]

Canada[edit]

United States[edit]

Oceania[edit]

Australia[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

Endnotes[edit]

These entries are actually "false" marble, near-marble, or marble mis-nomers:

  1. ^ Geologists consider Ashford Black Marble to be a type of carboniferous limestone.
  2. ^ Geologists consider Connemara marble to be a type of serpentinite.
  3. ^ Geologists consider Purbeck Marble to be a type of limestone.
  4. ^ Geologists consider Sussex Marble to be a type of limestone.
  5. ^ Geologists consider St. Genevieve marble to be an oolitic limestone.
  6. ^ Geologists consider Tennessee marble to be a compressed limestone.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paint and Decorate: Sienna marble Retrieved 2012-04-30

External links[edit]