List of unconfirmed exoplanets

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This is a list of unconfirmed extrasolar planets. When a planet candidate is confirmed, please remove it from this list and move it to List of extrasolar planets.
For a list of unconfirmed brown dwarfs, see list of brown dwarfs.
An artist's rendering of a hypothetical Jupiter-like exoplanet.

In addition to known extrasolar planets, there are many planet candidates whose existence is more or less uncertain, or they are now known not to exist. On February 2, 2011, the Kepler Space Observatory Mission team released a list of 1235 (unconfirmed) extrasolar planet candidates.[1] 68 candidates are "Earth-size" (smaller than 1.25 of the radius of Earth); 54 candidates are thought to be in the "Habitable Zone (HZ);" Six candidates (KOI 326.01, KOI 701.03, KOI 268.01, KOI 1026.01, KOI 854.01, KOI 70.03 - Table 6)[1] in the HZ are less than twice the size of the Earth; one candidate in the HZ is "Earth-size" (namely, KOI 326.01 at 0.85 the radius of Earth). Nonetheless, there are 54 unconfirmed extrasolar planets listed here.

Planet candidates with incomplete or poorly-constrained orbits[edit]

The following planet candidates have been detected indirectly (e.g. by the radial velocity method) but have not yet had sufficient observations to constrain their orbital properties, either because the planet has not yet completed a full orbit during the time of observation, or because the measurements are too sparse. The parameters given in this table are thus preliminary: further observations of these systems may result in significant changes.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Planet Mass
(MJ)
Orbital
period

(d)
Semimajor
axis

(AU)
Orbital
eccentricity
Discovery
year
Ref Notes
HD 1461 Cetus 00h 18m 42s −08° 03′ 11″ 76 e ≥0.072 454 1.165 0.74 2009 [2] The present day (2009) radial velocity method is hard to find Neptune-mass planets at more than 1 AU away from the stars.
HD 1461 Cetus 00h 18m 42s −08° 03′ 11″ 76 d ≥0.3 5000 5 0.16 2009 [2] All parameters for this planet are very poorly constrained.
GD 66 Auriga 05h 20m 38s +30° 48′ 24″ 170 b ≥2.36 2080 2.75 ~0 2009 [3][4] Partial orbit coverage
Gliese 317 Pyxis 08h 40m 59s −23° 27′ 23″ 49.9 c ≥1.6 ≥7100 ≥5.5 ~(0.0-0.8) 2007 [5][6] 2-planet solution modifies parameters of (confirmed) planet b.
Teegarden's Star Aries 02h 53m 01s +16° 52′ 53″ 12.57 b ≥0.24 2.06 0.014 2012 [7] Planetary nature of the RV signal to be confirmed.
Epsilon Indi A Indus 22h 03m 22s −56° 47′ 10″ 11.81 b ≳0.97 >10958 ≳8.57 2013 [8] Partial orbit coverage

Candidate transiting planets[edit]

There are several known stars for which potential planetary transits have been observed, however they lack enough follow-up information (such as radial velocity measurements) to rule out other hypotheses, such as the presence of a background eclipsing binary star, or a grazing transit of a larger object.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Planet Radius
(RJ)
Orbital
period

(d)
Discovery
year
Ref Notes
1SWASP-J115718.66+261906.1 Leo 11h 57m 19s +26° 19′ 06″ b 1.32 1.226804 2007 [9]
1SWASP-J130322.00+350525.4 Canes Venatici 13h 03m 22s +35° 05′ 25″ b 1.06 2.674207 2007 [9] Transit shape suggests this may be a grazing eclipsing binary.
1SWASP-J152131.01+213521.3 Serpens Caput 15h 21m 31s +21° 35′ 21″ b 1.62 1.338018 2007 [9]
1SWASP-J160242.43+290850.1 Corona Borealis 16h 02m 42s +29° 08′ 50″ b 1.53 1.304693 2007 [9] Transit shape suggests this may be a grazing eclipsing binary.
SWEEPS J175853.29−291233.5 Sagittarius 17h 58m 53s −29° 12′ 34″ ~22000 SWEEPS-01 1.01 1.566 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175853.38–291217.8 Sagittarius 17h 58m 53s −29° 12′ 18″ ~22000 SWEEPS-02 1.37 0.912 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175853.57–291144.1 Sagittarius 17h 58m 54s –29° 11′ 44″ ~22000 SWEEPS-03 0.87 1.279 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175854.60–291128.2 Sagittarius 17h 58m 55s –29° 11′ 28″ ~22000 SWEEPS-05 1.09 2.313 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175857.29–291253.4 Sagittarius 17h 58m 57s –29° 12′ 53″ ~22000 SWEEPS-06 0.82 3.039 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175857.69–291114.5 Sagittarius 17h 58m 58s –29° 11′ 15″ ~22000 SWEEPS-07 0.90 1.747 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175859.24–291328.7 Sagittarius 17h 58m 59s –29° 13′ 29″ ~22000 SWEEPS-08 0.98 0.868 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175859.60–291211.8 Sagittarius 17h 59m 00s –29° 12′ 12″ ~22000 SWEEPS-09 1.01 1.617 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175902.00–291323.7 Sagittarius 17h 59m 02s –29° 13′ 24″ ~22000 SWEEPS-10 1.24 0.424 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175904.44–291317.1 Sagittarius 17h 59m 04s –29° 13′ 17″ ~22000 SWEEPS-12 0.91 2.952 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175905.95–291305.6 Sagittarius 17h 59m 06s –29° 13′ 06″ ~22000 SWEEPS-13 0.78 1.684 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175907.56–291039.8 Sagittarius 17h 59m 08s –29° 10′ 40″ ~22000 SWEEPS-14 0.93 2.965 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175907.64–291023.7 Sagittarius 17h 59m 08s –29° 10′ 24″ ~22000 SWEEPS-15 1.37 0.541 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
SWEEPS J175908.44–291140.6 Sagittarius 17h 59m 08s –29° 11′ 41″ ~22000 SWEEPS-16 1.40 0.969 2006 [10] Distance modulus = 14.1
CoRoT-102636650 Monoceros 06h 42m 18s −01° 24′ 06″ - CoRoT-102636650 b - 8.1 2007 [11]
CoRoT-102638570 Monoceros 06h 42m 21s −01° 11′ 48″ - CoRoT-102638570 b - 6.5 2007 [12]
OGLE-TR-123 Carina 11h 06m 51s −61° 11′ 10″ 500 pc OGLE-TR-123 b 0.41 1.803 2010 [13] Needs RV measurement
OGLE-TR-173 Musca 13h 14m 56s −65° 02′ 00″ 100 pc OGLE-TR-173 b 0.43 2.605 2010 [14] Needs RV
OGLE-TR-61 Carina 11h 08m 41s −61° 07′ 59″ 250 pc OGLE-TR-61 b 0.6 4.268 2010 [15] Needs RV
OGLE-TR-74 Carina 11h 06m 11s −61° 14′ 53″ 250 pc OGLE-TR-74 b 0.63 1.581 2010 [16] Needs RV

Planets suspected from dust disk morphology[edit]

The following planets have been predicted based on the morphology of dust disks around their stars.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Planet Mass
(MJ)
Semimajor
axis

(AU)
Orbital
eccentricity
Discovery
year
Ref Notes
Epsilon Eridani Eridanus 03h 32m 55s −09° 27′ 29″ 10.5 ~20 2008 [17] Associated with ~20 AU planetesimal belt.
Epsilon Eridani Eridanus 03h 32m 55s −09° 27′ 29″ 10.5 c ~0.1 ~40 ~0.3 2002 [18] Associated with outer icy debris disk.
Beta Pictoris Pictor 05h 47m 17s −51° 03′ 59″ 63.4 ~0.5 ~25 ~0.01 2007 [19] Associated with ~32 AU planetesimal belt.
Beta Pictoris Pictor 05h 47m 17s −51° 03′ 59″ 63.4 ~0.1 ~45 ~0.01 2007 [19] Associated with ~52 AU planetesimal belt.
Kappa Coronae Borealis Corona Borealis 15h 51m 14s 35° 39′ 27″ 101.5 2013 [20] Associated with dust disk surrounding the star.

Stars with radial velocity trends[edit]

The following stars have long-term radial velocity trends in addition to any confirmed planets they may have. This may indicate the presence of objects (possibly planetary in nature) in long-period orbits in these systems.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Velocity trend
(m/s per year)
Ref Notes
HD 28185 Eridanus 04h 26m 26s −10° 33′ 02″ 138 11.0 [21] No trend found by Magellan Planet Search Program.[22]
Gliese 849 Aquarius 22h 09m 40s −04° 38′ 27″ 28.7 −4.6 [23]

Systems with possible transit variations[edit]

The following extrasolar planets have been suggested to have variations in the parameters of their transits across the face of their parent stars which may be caused by perturbations from an additional planet. Note that the planet designations listed in this table refer to the (confirmed) transiting planets: it is the additional perturbing planet that is unconfirmed. The discovery year refers to the discovery of the transit variations.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Transiting
Planet
Discovery
year
Ref Notes
OGLE-TR-111 Carina 10h 53m 01s −61° 24′ 20″ 5000 b 2008 [24] Unconfirmed second transiting planet.[25]
Gliese 436 Leo 11h 42m 11s +26° 42′ 23″ 33.48 b 2008 [26][27] Planet candidate Gliese 436 c has been retracted,[28] but alternate solutions are possible.[27]
WASP-3 WASP-3 c 2010

Dubious and disproven candidates[edit]

This list includes disproven planets: objects which are no longer thought to be planetary, or no longer thought to exist at all, and objects which are detections which are suspected to be non-planetary in nature, for example radial velocity variations which may be caused by stellar variations. This list also contains planets which cannot be confirmed, for example planets detected in microlensing events which have low observational coverage.

Star Constellation Right
ascension
Declination Distance
(ly)
Planet Discovery
year
Detection
method
Ref Notes
WASP-9 483 b 2008 Transit [29] Discovery retracted: blended eclipsing binary in hierarchical triple.[30]
HD 11964 Cetus 01h 57m 09s −10° 14′ 32″ 110.8 d 2007 Radial velocity [31] Not detected in re-reduced data.[32] Detection possibly an effect of Earth's orbital motion.[31]
TMR-1 Taurus 04h 39m 14s +25° 53′ 21″ 460 C 1998 Imaging [33] Background star.[34]
HD 33636 Orion 05h 11m 46s +04° 24′ 13″ 91.6 b 2002 Radial velocity [35] Companion is a red dwarf star in a low-inclination orbit.[36]
TW Hydrae Hydra 11h 01m 52s −34° 42′ 17″ 180 b 2007 Radial velocity [37] Radial velocity variations caused by stellar spots.[38]
ChaHa8 Chamaeleon 11h 07m 48s −77° 40′ 08″ 160 pc b 2007 Radial velocity [39] New velocity measurements in 2010 bring the mass above the planetary mass limit (30 to 59 MJ)
Gliese 436 Leo 11h 42m 11s +26° 42′ 23″ 33.48 c 2008 Transit variations [26] Retracted by authors.[28] Alternate solutions are still possible.[27]
61 Virginis Virgo 13h 18m 24.3s −18° 18′ 40.3″ 27.8 d 2009 Radial velocity [40] Not detected by independent measurements [41]
QS Virginis Virgo 13h 49m 52s –13° 13′ 38″ 156.48 b 2009 Eclipsing binary minima [42] Subsequent timings showed that patterns were not predicted by planetary models. The best fit model for an orbit would have mass 50 MJup (0.05 M) in an eccentric, 14-year orbit.[42]
1SWASP-J161732.90+242119.0 Hercules 16h 17m 33s +24° 21′ 19″ b 2007 Transits [9] No radial velocity variations: planet hypothesis ruled out.[9]
HD 150706 Ursa Minor 16h 31m 18s +79° 47′ 23″ 88.8 b 2002 Radial velocity [43] Not detected in independent measurements.[44]
MACHO-1997-BLG-41 (lens) Sagittarius 17h 56m 21s –28° 47′ 42″ ~10000 1999 Microlensing [45] Detection explained by orbital motion of binary star in lens system.[46]
Barnard's Star Ophiuchus 17h 57m 48s +04° 41′ 36″ 5.98 various 1963 Astrometry [47] Failed independent confirmation.[48] Artifact of telescope maintenance procedures.[49]
PSR B1829−10 Scutum 18h 32m 40s –10° 21′ 33″ 30000 1991 Pulsar timing [50] Error in correcting for Earth's orbital motion.[51]
HD 188753 A Cygnus 19h 54m 58s +41° 52′ 18″ 149 b 2005 Radial velocity [52] Planet not detected in follow-up; original data do not support planet hypothesis.[53]
HD 208487 Grus 21h 57m 20s −37° 45′ 49″ 144 c 2005 Radial velocity [54] Radial velocity variations probably caused by stellar activity.[44]
HD 219542 B Pisces 23h 16m 35s −01° 35′ 07″ 178 b 2003 Radial velocity [55] Radial velocity variations caused by stellar activity.[56]

Hypothetical extrasolar planet types[edit]

Hypothetical types of extrasolar planet include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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