List of unreleased material recorded by The Bee Gees

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The Bee Gees are known to have performed and/or recorded a number of songs and other instrumentals which have never been officially released on a single or album.

Sessions[edit]

Bee Gees' 1st[edit]

Horizontal[edit]

  • "Granny's Mr. Dog" is a song written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb recorded in 25 July 1967 with the early version of "And the Sun Will Shine".[1]
  • "All So Lonely!" was written by Colin Petersen or Vince Melouney recorded in 30 July 1967 with "Birdie Told Me", "Ring My Bell", *"Barker of the UFO" and "Harry Braff".[1]
  • "Vince's Number" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb. In 2005 interview with Vince Melouney, he identified that the song was written by the brothers for him to sing, but the idea was dropped for some reason as the song was sung by Robin.[1]
  • "Maccleby's Secret" is a song written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb recorded in 3 October 1967.[1]
  • "When Things Go Wrong" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb that was recorded in November 7, 1967, two days after the Hither Green rail crash on which Robin was there as he not come to the sessions in 7 November.[1]

Idea[edit]

  • "I Can Lift a Mountain" (later changed as "We Can Lift a Mountain") was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb in 1968, recorded same time as "Chocolate Symphony". The Bee Gees were contracted to write songs for a Swedish television series based on the Pippi Longstocking books by Astrid Lindgren. An acetate has preserved a demo of Robin in character saying 'I am just a girl, but...' and on into this track. The date of this demo is not known.[2]
  • "She Is Russia" was recorded in 15 January 1968.[2]
  • "In the Middle of the Grass" was written by the Gibb brothers recorded in 1967 or 1968.[2]
  • "Let Your Heart Out" was written by the Gibb brothers recorded in 1967 or 1968.[2]
  • "The Square Cup" was written by the Gibb brothers recorded in 1967 or 1968.[2]
  • "Stepping Out" was recorded in 12 June 1968 as a jam session.[2]
  • "No Name" was recorded in 12 and 18 June 1968 as a jam session.
  • "Maypole Mews" was written by the Gibb brothers recorded in 21 and 25 June 1968.[2]
  • "Men of Men" was written by the Gibb brothers and recorded in 21 and 25 June 1968, the song was a favorite of Maurice's as he re-recorded it in 1970 with his band The Bloomfields.[2]

Cucumber Castle[edit]

  • "Who Knows What a Room Is" was written by Barry and Maurice Gibb recorded in 7 May 1969.[3]
  • "Give a Hand, Take a Hand" was written by Barry and Maurice and recorded around May 1969 that version was not released, but it was re-recorded in 1974 on Mr. Natural sessions and that version was released.[3]
  • "The Day Your Eyes Meet Mine" was written by Barry and Maurice Gibb recorded in 9 July 1969. It was re-recorded by Barry in 1970 for his debut solo album The Kid's No Good.[3]
  • "Every Time I See You Smile" was written by Barry and Maurice Gibb, recorded in July 1969.[3]
  • "There Goes My Heart Again" was written by Barry and Maurice, probably recorded in July or August.[3]
  • "Cucumber Castle Theme" was written by Barry and Maurice, it was an instrumental, the last song before the film Cucumber Castle as well as the last track with Colin Petersen.[3]

2 Years On[edit]

  • "You Got to Lose it in the End" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb that was recorded in 26 August 1970.[4]
  • "Little Red Train" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb that was recorded in 26 August 1970.[4]
  • "Sweet Summer Rain" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb that was recorded in 26 August 1970.[4]
  • "Maybe Tomorrow" was written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb that was recorded in 27 August 1970.[4]
  • "Don't Forget Me Ida" was written by Barry that was recorded in 30 September 1970.[4]
  • "Lost" was recorded in 5 October 1970, probably written any of Barry, Robin and Maurice.[4]
  • "Fantasy" was recorded in 5 October 1970, probably written any of Barry, Robin and Maurice.[4]
  • "To Dance Again" is an instrumental, it was recorded around 1970, and was composed by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb for a TV version of The Three Musketeers it has been appeared on bootlegs as "Modulating Maurice" (a song written by Maurice and Ringo Starr in 1969 in Starr's home studio).[4]

Trafalgar[edit]

  • "Together" was written by Barry, recorded in 13 December 1970.[4]
  • "Over the Hill and the Mountain" was written by any of Barry, Robin and Maurice, recorded in 13 December 1970.[4]
  • "Merrily Merry Eyes" was written by Barry and Robin, recorded in 13 December 1970.[4]
  • "If I Were the Sky" was written by Barry and Robin, recorded in 28 January 1971.[5]
  • "Ellan Vannin" was a song from 1854 lead vocals by Barry, Robin and Maurice.[5]
  • "I'm Only Me" was written in Barry and Robin Gibb, recorded in 23 March 1971.[5]
  • "Something" was written any of Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb, recorded in 23 March 1971.[5]
  • "Amorous Aristocracy" was written by Barry and Robin Gibb, recorded in 23 March 1971.[5]
  • "Irresponsible, Unreliable, Indispensable Blues" was written by Barry Gibb, recorded in 29 March 1971.[5]
  • "A Word of Love" was written any of Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb recorded in 29 March 1971.[5]


Notes

On the February 4, 1971 session, the band recorded "You Leave Me Hanging On", "Boots", "Nightwatch", "C'Mon Tappelais", "Telegraph to the Pine Trees", "You ? Me Down", "Mr. Good Memories Man", "Long Chain On", "Cigarette" and "Blue". A four-track reel is called a demo session, two of the songs seem to be the earlier songs that was "You Keep Me Hanging On" by The Supremes and "Long Chain On" by Peter, Paul and Mary. The track "You ? Me Down" was not fully legible.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1967". Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1968". Retrieved 22 May 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1969". Retrieved 22 April 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1970". Retrieved 8 August 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Brennan, Joseph. "Gibb Songs: 1971". Retrieved 8 November 2013.