List of urban prefects of Constantinople

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This is a list of urban prefects or eparchs of Constantinople. The Prefect or Eparch (in Greek: ὁ ἔπαρχος τῆς πόλεως) was one of the oldest and longest-lived offices of the East Roman (Byzantine) Empire, being created in 359 and surviving relatively unaltered until the Fourth Crusade. The Eparch was one of the most important officials of the Empire, and exercised full control over all aspects of the administration of Constantinople, the Byzantine Empire's capital. In the Palaiologan period (1261–1453) the title was still awarded, but the office was replaced by several kephalatikeuontes (sing. kephalatikeuon, κεφαλατικεύων, "headsman"), who each oversaw a district, effectively a separate village within the now much less populous capital.

4th century[edit]

Proconsuls of Constantinople (until 359)[edit]

Prefects of Constantinople (from 359)[edit]

5th century[edit]

  • Clearchus (400–402)
  • Simplicius (403)
  • Paianius (404)
  • Studius (404)
  • Optatus (404–405)
  • Gemellus (404/408)
  • Aemilianus (406)
  • Monaxius (17 January 408 – 26 April 409)
  • Anthemius Isidorus (4 September 410 – 20 October 412)
  • Priscianus (413)
  • Ursus (415–416)
  • Aetius (419)
  • Florentius (422)
  • Severinus (423–424)
  • Constantius (424–425)
  • Theophilus (425–426)
  • Cyrus of Panopolis (426)
  • Neuthius
  • Proculus (428)
  • Heliodorus (432)
  • Leontius (434–435)
  • Cyrus of Panopolis (439–441)
  • Iustinianus (474)[1]
  • Adamantius (474–479)

7th century[edit]

  • Kosmas (c. 608)

8th century[edit]

9th century[edit]

10th century[edit]

12th century[edit]

13th century[edit]

Latin Occupation (1204–1261)

14th century[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Attested by a law issued on March 16 and preserved in Codex Justiniani II 7.16a. "Iustinianus 4", Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire, Volume 2, Cambridge University Press, 1992, ISBN 0-521-20159-4, p. 645.

Sources[edit]