List of wettest tropical cyclones in the United States

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Map showing the highest rainfall totals measured in certain regions.
U.S. tropical cyclone rainfall maxima per state

Many of the wettest tropical cyclones in the United States have moved into the contiguous United States from the Atlantic Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico, and the eastern Pacific Ocean. The highest rainfall totals in the country have been measured across the Gulf Coast and lower portions of the Eastern Seaboard. Intermediate amounts have been measured across the Southwest, New England, and the Midwest. The northern Great Plains and Pacific Northwest have received the lowest amounts, as those regions lie exceptionally far from the breeding grounds of Atlantic and Eastern Pacific tropical cyclones.

A measurement of 48 in (1,200 mm) of rain during Tropical Storm Amelia holds the record for the highest precipitation total observed with a tropical cyclone in the contiguous United States. Tropical Storm Claudette holds the national 24-hour rainfall record, with 42 in (1,100 mm) observed within such a timeframe. Taking place only one year apart, in 1978 and 1979, Amelia and Claudette are also the two wettest tropical cyclones on record to have occurred in Texas. Hurricane Hiki in 1950 led to significant rainfall in the mountains of Hawaii; with 52 in (1,300 mm) of rainfall reported, this is the most rainfall reported to have been produced by a tropical cyclone within the entirety of the United States.

Overall wettest[edit]

Below is a list of the top ten highest storm total rainfall amounts from individual tropical cyclones across the United States since 1950, including territories.

Wettest tropical cyclones in the United States
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1321 52.00 Hiki 1950 Kanalohuluhulu Ranger Station [1]
2 1219 48.00 Amelia 1978 Medina, Texas [2]
3 1148 45.20 Easy 1950 Yankeetown, Florida [2]
4 1143 45.00 Claudette 1979 Alvin, Texas [2]
5 1058.7 41.68 T. D. #19 1970 Jayuya, Puerto Rico [2]
6 1033 40.68 Allison 2001 Northwest Jefferson County, Texas [2]
7 985 38.76 Paul 2000 Kapapala Ranch 36 [3]
8 977 38.46 Georges 1998 Munson, Florida [2]
9 932 36.71 Danny 1997 Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Alabama [2]
10 856.0 33.70 Pamela 1976 Guam WSMO [2]

Overall wettest in the contiguous United States[edit]

Below is a list of the top ten highest storm total rainfall amounts from individual tropical cyclones across the contiguous United States since 1950. The remains of Amelia 1978 led to the wettest storm total rainfall amounts of any tropical cyclone to impact the lower 48 over that time frame when it moved into Texas during early August 1978.[2] Most of the rainfall information was provided by the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, North Carolina.

Flooding due to Claudette in Texas
Wettest tropical cyclones on the United States Mainland
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1219 48.00 Amelia 1978 Medina, Texas [2]
2 1148 45.20 Easy 1950 Yankeetown, Florida [2]
3 1143 45.00 Claudette 1979 Alvin, Texas [2]
4 1033 40.68 Allison 2001 Northwest Jefferson County, Texas [2]
5 977 38.46 Georges 1998 Munson, Florida [2]
6 932 36.71 Danny 1997 Dauphin Island Sea Lab, Alabama [2]
7 756 29.76 Unnamed 1960 Port Lavaca #2, Texas [2]
8 707 27.85 Alberto 1994 Americus, Georgia [2]
9 695 27.38 Beulah 1967 Pettus, Texas [2]
10 686 27.00 Camille 1969 West Central Nelson County, Virginia [2]

Alabama[edit]

The wettest tropical cyclone to impact the state of Alabama was Hurricane Danny, which stalled over Mobile Bay for over 24 hours, and which led to significant rainfall.[4]

Hurricane Danny (1997)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Alabama
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 958.9 37.75 Danny 1997 Dauphin Island Sea Lab [2]
2 753.4 29.66 Georges 1998 Bay Minette [5]
3 574.8 22.63 Alberto 1994 Enterprise 5 NNW [5]
4 493.3 19.42 Opal 1995 Brewton 3 ENE [2]
5 469.9 18.50 1926 Miami hurricane Bay Minette [6]
6 428.0 16.85 Debbie 1965 Mobile [2]
7 420.6 16.56 Unnamed 1987 Brewton 3 SSE [5]
8 408.7 16.09 Beryl 1988 Dauphin Island #2 [2]
9 393.7 15.50 Tropical Storm Two 1931 Seven Hill [6]
10 355.4 13.99 Isaac 2012 Grand Bay [7]

Alaska[edit]

No tropical cyclone has ever affected Alaska, but extratropical remnants of tropical cyclones have been known to bring heavy rainfall to the state. Examples include the extratropical remains of Hurricane Fico in 1978.[8]

American Samoa[edit]

Cyclone Heta (2004)

Tropical cyclones impact the island chain with tropical storm-force winds once every three years, on average.[9] The wettest known cyclone to affect the island group occurred early in 1966, when nearly 19 inches (480 mm) fell at Vaipito.[2]

Wettest tropical cyclones in American Samoa
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 472.4 18.60 Unnamed Jan-Feb 1966 Vaipito [2]
2 445.5 17.54 Val 1991 Pago Pago Airport [2]
3 394.7 15.54 Ofa 1990 Aasufou [2]
4 359.9 14.17 Heta 2004 Aasufou [2]
5 254.5 10.02 Olaf 2005 Aasufou [2]
6 242.8 9.56 Wilma 2011 NWS Pago Pago [10]
7 212.1 8.35 Esau 1981 Aasufou [2]
8 118.0 4.66 Nisha 2010 NWS Pago Pago [11]
9 95.5 3.76 Keli 1997 Afono [2]
10 80.5 3.17 Tusi 1987 Afono [2]

Arizona[edit]

Hurricane Nora was the last tropical cyclone to enter the United States from Mexico at tropical storm strength.[12] The rainfall which fell across the Harquahala Mountains led to the state's 24-hour rainfall record.[13]

A weakening Nora (1997)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Arizona
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 305.1 12.01 Nora 1997 Harquahala Mountains [14]
2 304.8 12.00 Octave 1983 Mount Graham [14]
3 210.8 8.30 Heather 1977 Nogales [14]
4 178.1 7.01 Doreen 1977 Yuma Valley [14]
5 177.8 7.00 Javier 2004 Walnut Creek [14]
6 133.9 5.27 Lester 1992 Irving [14]
7 96.0 3.78 Raymond 1989 Santa Rita Experiment Range [14]
8 83.3 3.28 Boris 1990 Santa Rita Experiment Range [14]
9 72.9 2.87 Kathleen 1976 Davis Dam #2 [14]
10 71.9 2.83 Marty 2003 Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument [14]

Arkansas[edit]

Tropical Storm Allison in 1989 stalled for three days across southeast Texas which led to prolonged rains across Arkansas. This way, Allison became the wettest known tropical cyclone to impact the state.[15]

Tropical Storm Allison (1989)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Arkansas
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 353.3 13.91 Allison 1989 Portland [5]
2 349.8 13.77 Bertha 1957 Damascus 2 NNE [16]
3 298.5 11.75 Bonnie 1986 El Dorado Regional AP [5]
4 298.2 11.74 Gustav 2008 Eudora/Bayou Macon [17]
5 286.8 11.29 Isaac 2012 White Hall 0.8 SE [7]
6 283.5 11.16 Unnamed 1960 Clarendon [5]
7 265.4 10.45 Frances 1998 Sparkman [5]
8 248.9 9.80 Hurricane One, 1942 Springbank [6]
9 246.9 9.72 Delia 1973 Jessieville [5]
10 236.7 9.32 Elena 1985 Mountain Home [5]

California[edit]

One of five known eastern Pacific tropical cyclones to bring tropical storm-force winds to the Southwest,[18] Hurricane Kathleen accelerated northward ahead of an upper level trough, spreading heavy rains into the transverse ranges of southern California.[19]

Hurricane Norman (1978)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in California
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 374.9 14.76 Kathleen 1976 San Gorgonio [14]
2 294.6 11.60 1939 California tropical storm Mount Wilson [20]
3 189.2 7.45 Doreen 1977 Mount San Jacinto [14]
4 182.6 7.19 Olivia 1982 Grant Grove [14]
5 178.1 7.01 Norman 1978 Lodgepole [14]
6 88.1 3.47 Nora 1997 Beaumont 1 E [14]
7 76.5 3.01 Isis 1998 Balch Power House [14]
8 55.1 2.17 Ignacio 1997 Three Peaks [2]
9 42.2 1.66 Lester 1992 Parker Reservoir [14]
10 34.3 1.35 Boris 1990 Boulevard 2 [14]

Colorado[edit]

Few tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific make it as far north as Colorado. Javier dropped locally heavy rainfall exceeding 4 inches (100 mm) over the higher terrain of western Colorado in 2004.[14]

Hurricane Lester (1992)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants to affect Colorado
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 135.9 5.35 Lester 1992 Wolf Creek Pass 1 E [14]
2 109.2 4.30 Javier 2004 Beartown [14]
3 48.3 1.90 Dolly 2008 Her [14]

Connecticut[edit]

While Hurricane Diane is wettest known tropical cyclone to impact New England, the 1938 New England hurricane produced the most rain in the state of Connecticut.[2] Nonetheless, the flood from Hurricane Diane led to a significant death toll (nearly 200) from Pennsylvania eastward through southern New England.[21]

Hurricane Eloise
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Connecticut
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 434.3 17.10 1938 New England hurricane Buck [6]
2 428.2 16.86 Diane 1955 Torrington #2 [22]
3 338.3 13.32 Eloise 1975 Mount Carmel [22]
4 289.6 11.40 Floyd 1999 West Hartford [22]
5 257.8 10.15 Irene 2011 New Hartford [23]
6 240.8 9.48 Connie 1955 Round Pond [22]
7 185.9 7.34 Donna 1960 Wolcott Reservoir [22]
8 162.3 6.39 Lee 2011 Danbury [24]
9 158.0 6.22 Bob 1991 Norwich Public Utility Plant [22]
10 152.4 6.00 Hurricane Seven, 1934 [6]

Delaware[edit]

Hurricane Donna Radar image

A large swath of heavy rainfall spread associated with a predecessor rainfall event fell before 1933 Chesapeake–Potomac hurricane arrived in Delaware. Over four days, a total of 13.24 inches (336 mm) of rain fell in Bridgeville, the most known associated with a tropical cyclone anywhere in Delaware.[6]

Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Delaware
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 278.9 10.98 Sandy 2012 Indian River Inlet [25]
2 268.7 10.58 Floyd 1999 Greenwood 2 NE [25]
3 264.9 10.43 Irene 2011 Ellendale [23]
4 207.8 8.18 Connie 1955 Newark University Farm [25]
5 195.6 7.70 Donna 1960 Bridgeville 1 NW [25]
6 193.0 7.60 Agnes 1972 Middletown 3 E [25]
7 181.1 7.13 Danny 1985 Lewes [25]
8 175.7 6.90 1933 Chesapeake–Potomac hurricane Bridgeville [25]
9 174.5 6.87 Allison 1989 Wilmington New Castle [25]
10 158.0 6.22 1944 Great Atlantic hurricane Millsboro [25]

Florida[edit]

The heaviest rainfall to occur in 24 hours was measured in Yankeetown during Hurricane Easy in 1950, which caused 38.70 inches (983 mm) of precipitation. This is also the highest known point storm total maximum related to any tropical cyclone which has impacted Florida,[2] and by itself would be the highest known rainfall total for any month, or any 24 hour period, from any location within Florida. This rainfall amount remained the national 24-hour rainfall record until Tropical Storm Claudette's landfall in 1979.[26]

Tropical Storm Debby on June 25, 2012. The system was producing torrential rainfall over the Florida Panhandle throughout the day.
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Florida
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1148.1 45.20 Easy 1950 Yankeetown [27]
2 976.9 38.46 Georges 1998 Munson [27]
3 889.0 35.00 October Hurricane 1941 Trenton [28]
4 731.0 28.78 Debby 2012 Curtis Mill [27]
5 702.3 27.65 Fay 2008 Melbourne/Windover Farms [27]
6 649.2 25.56 Dennis 1981 Homestead/Ira Ebersole [27]
7 635.0 25.00 TD 1, 1992 Arcadia Tower [27]
8 634.5 24.98 Jeanne 1980 Key West International Airport [27]
9 622.2 24.50 July 1916 Hurricane Bonifay [6]
10 602.7 23.73 Dora 1964 Mayo [27]

Georgia[edit]

Tropical Storm Alberto in 1994 looped across central Georgia, leading to 24-hour rainfall amounts exceeding 20 inches (510 mm) across central sections of the state.[29] It also became the wettest tropical cyclone on record for the state of Georgia, eclipsing the record set in 1929.[30]

Alberto (1994)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Georgia
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 707.4 27.85 Alberto 1994 Americus [29]
2 621.3 24.46 1929 Florida Hurricane Washington [30]
3 558.8 22.00 T. D. #29 1969 Attapulgus Mine [31]
4 541.0 21.30 Fay 2008 Thomasville 5 WNW [31]
5 508.0 20.00 1929 Bahamas hurricane Glenville [6]
6 505.2 19.89 Marco 1990 Louisville 1E [2]
7 412.5 16.24 Easy 1950 Savannah Hunter Field [31]
8 395.2 15.56 Hanna 2002 Donalsonville [2]
9 367.8 14.48 Tammy 2005 Darien [2]
10 347.5 13.68 Southeast hurricane 1940 Louisville 1 E [31]

Guam[edit]

Super Typhoon Pamela was not only a wet tropical cyclone for the island of Guam, but a destructive one as well. Since Pamela, wooden structures across Guam have been largely replaced by concrete structures in order to better weather typhoons.[32][33]

Typhoon Pongsona (2002)
Wettest tropical cyclones on Guam
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 856.0 33.70 Pamela 1976 Guam WSMO [2]
2 846.8 33.34 Alice 1953 Andersen Air Force Base [2]
3 650.5 25.61 Pongsona 2002 University of Guam [34][35]
4 610.4 24.03 Tingting 2004 Inarajan Agricultural Station [2]
5 539.5 21.24 Paka 1997 Guam WSMO [2]
6 533.0 21.00 Chataan 2002 South-central Guam [36]
7 519.2 20.44 Omar 1992 Guam WSMO [2]
8 414.5 16.32 Ida 1969 Andersen Air Force Base [2]
9 411.2 16.19 Amy 1971 Guam WSMO [2]
10 364.5 14.35 Nabi 2005 Mangilao [2]

Hawaii[edit]

Hurricane Kenneth

This island state frequently sees rainfall from the remains of former eastern and central Pacific tropical cyclones. However, despite Hawaii's location in the subtropics, direct impacts by tropical cyclones are infrequent due to the protective influence of the Central Pacific Tropical Upper Tropospheric Trough (TUTT), which normally dissipates systems approaching Hawaii. Hurricane Hiki in 1950 led to significant rainfall in the mountains, with 52 inches (1,300 mm) of rainfall reported.[1] This is the most rainfall reported to have been produced by a tropical cyclone within the United States.[2]

Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Hawaii
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1321 52.00 Hiki 1950 Kanalohuluhulu Ranger Station [1]
2 985 38.76 Paul 2000 Kapapala Ranch 36 [3]
3 635 25.00 Maggie 1970 [37]
4 519 20.42 Nina 1957 Wainiha [38]
5 516 20.33 Iwa 1982 Intake Wainiha 1086 [2]
6 476 18.75 Fabio 1988 Papaikou Mauka 140.1 [2]
7 381 15.00 TD 01C, 1994 Waiakea Uka, Piihonua [39]
8 372 14.63 Felicia 2009 Oahu Forecast National Wildlife Refuge [40]
9 323 12.70 Makawao 1906 Makawao, Maui [1]
10 305 12.00 Diana 1972 [41]
10 305 12.00 "B" 1967 [42]
10 305 12.00 Kenneth 2005 [43]

Idaho[edit]

Impacts from tropical cyclones in the Pacific Northwest are rare. Most recently, the remains of Olivia moved through the region in 1982, spurring spotty moderate to heavy rainfall across Idaho.[14]

Olivia (1982)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Indiana
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 52.1 2.05 Kathleen 1976 Ketchum RS [14]
2 50.5 1.99 Olivia 1982 Powell [14]

Illinois[edit]

Hurricane Audrey directed moisture up to a front to its north across the Midwest during late June 1957 as it transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. Heavy rains fell across central Illinois, leading to the wettest known event to be associated with a tropical cyclone or its remains across Illinois.[44]

Hurricane Paine (1986)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Illinois
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 259.1 10.20 Audrey 1957 Paris [25]
2 207.8 8.18 Carla 1961 Mount Carroll [25]
3 108.5 7.64 Claudette 1979 Hutsonville Power Plant [25]
4 192.5 7.58 Paine 1986 Avon 5 NE [25]
5 178.6 7.03 Tico 1983 New Athenas [25]
6 151.4 5.96 Lester 1992 Mattoon [25]
7 146.1 5.75 Chantal 1989 Fulton Dam 13 [25]
8 135.9 5.35 Debra 1978 Carbondale Sewage Plant [25]
9 127.0 5.00 Ike 2008 Decatur [45]
10 118.9 4.68 Allison 1989 Rosiclare 5 NW [25]

Indiana[edit]

Similarly to Illinois, Indiana experienced its wettest tropical cyclone in 1957 with the arrival of Hurricane Audrey.[44] In 1979, Hurricane Bob produced considerable flooding in the state.[46]

Hurricane Isidore (2002)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Indiana
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 225.3 8.87 Audrey 1957 Rockville [47]
2 209.8 8.26 Tico 1983 Seymour 2 N [47]
3 174.2 6.86 Isidore 2002 Lexington 3 N [47]
4 162.6 6.40 Erin 1995 North Vernon 1 NW [47]
5 146.6 5.77 Claudette 1979 Jasper [47]
6 145.3 5.72 Bob 1979 Edwardsport Power Plant [47]
7 131.1 5.16 Katrina 2005 Hanover Radio [47]
8 121.4 4.78 Debra 1978 Crane NSA [47]
9 112.8 4.44 Arlene 2005 Evansville [47]
10 104.1 4.10 Gustav 2008 Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore [47]

Iowa[edit]

Hurricane Carla was a large hurricane that moved into Texas during September 1961. As it transitioned into an extratropical cyclone across the Great Plains and Midwest, heavy rain fell in a band on the poleward side of a frontal boundary extending northeast from Carla, leading to the wettest known event to be associated with a tropical cyclone or its remains across Iowa.[47]

Hurricane Carla
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants to affect Iowa
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 229.4 9.03 Carla 1961 Chariton 1 E [47]
2 124.5 4.90 Frances 1998 Fort Madison [47]
3 120.9 4.76 Paine 1986 Keokuk Lock Dam 19 [47]
4 99.8 3.93 Waldo 1985 Keosauqua [47]
5 94.0 3.70 Newton 1986 Mount Pleasant 1 SSW [47]
6 86.4 3.40 Chantal 1989 De Witt [47]
7 84.3 3.32 Lester 1992 Sigourney [47]
8 82.3 3.24 Gustav 2008 Rathbun Dam 2 N [47]
9 79.0 3.11 Tico 1983 Centerville [47]
10 60.7 2.39 Juan 1985 Bellevue Lock and Dam 12 [47]

Kansas[edit]

Heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm Frances fell from the western Gulf Coast northward into the Great Plains. Spreading across portions of Kansas, precipitation included with localized amounts above 12 inches (300 mm).[47]

Hurricane Newton (1986)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants to affect Kansas
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 317.5 12.50 Frances 1998 Fort Scott [47]
2 288.3 11.35 Paine 1986 Fort Scott [47]
3 216.4 8.52 Carla 1961 Haddam [47]
4 170.4 6.71 Tico 1983 Independence [47]
5 147.1 5.79 Newton 1986 Tonganoxie 5 SE [47]
6 138.4 5.45 Waldo 1985 Burns [47]
7 127.0 5.00 Gilbert 1988 Cedar Vale [47]
8 117.6 4.63 Norma 1981 Iola 1 W [47]
9 114.6 4.51 Matthew 2004 Hale [47]
10 104.4 4.11 Gustav 2008 Pittsburg [47]

Kentucky[edit]

Soon after moving inland, the Unnamed tropical cyclone of 1960 looped over South Texas, leading to heavy rains along the coastal plain near Port Lavaca. As it moved north-northeast, bursts of heavy rainfall were accompanied with the system over Arkansas and Kentucky. The maximum in Kentucky not only represents their highest tropical cyclone-related rainfall amount on record, but also the state's all-time 24 hour precipitation record (through 1998).[48]

Hurricane Elena (1985)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Kentucky
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 285.8 11.25 Unnamed 1960 Dunmor [47]
2 242.1 9.53 Dennis 2005 [49]
3 207.5 8.17 Isidore 2002 Paradise Steam Plant [47]
4 205.2 8.08 Elena 1985 WPSD-TV Paducah [47]
5 201.7 7.94 Katrina 2005 Finney [47]
6 195.8 7.71 Tico 1983 Lloyd Greenup Dam [47]
7 193.0 7.60 Frederic 1979 Aberdeen [47]
8 172.5 6.79 Chris 1982 Franklin 1 E [47]
9 170.4 6.71 Jerry 1989 Gray Hawk [47]
10 166.9 6.57 Allison 1989 Franklin 1 E [47]

Louisiana[edit]

Heavy rains and flooding are the primary problem associated with tropical cyclones across the Pelican State. Recent examples of flooding across the state from tropical cyclones include Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, Tropical Storm Frances in 1998, Tropical Storm Allison in 1989, and Tropical Storm Claudette in 1979. Three of the four systems stalled across eastern Texas, prolonging the rainfall which occurred over Louisiana. If it were not for the intermittent invasions from tropical cyclones, rainfall during the months of August, September, and October would average about 25% less than it currently does.[50]

Allison (2001)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Louisiana
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 952.2 37.50 Unnamed 1940 Miller Island [6]
2 760.0 29.92 Allison 2001 Thibodaux [5]
3 652.0 25.67 Allison 1989 Winnfield [5]
4 535.9 22.39 Frances 1998 Terrytown [5]
5 541.0 21.30 Unnamed 1933 Logansport [6]
6 533.4 21.00 Gustav 2008 Larto Lake [5]
7 524.8 20.66 Isaac 2012 New Orleans Carrollton [7]
8 497.8 19.60 Hurricane Three 1908 Franklin [6]
9 482.6 19.00 Hurricane Six 1943 Morgan City [6]
10 464.8 18.30 Cindy 1963 Vinton [5]

Maine[edit]

The combined impact from a Nor'easter just one day before Daisy hit, and Hurricane Daisy, caused severe flooding in Maine, when rain fell for 65 consecutive hours in some locations. Rainfall from the two systems caused record rainfall in some areas in Maine.[51][52] Flooding caused by Hurricane Irene's heavy rainfall washed out two bridges on State Route 27 in Carrabassett Valley.[53]

Hurricane Daisy
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Maine
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 251.7 9.91 Irene 2011 St. Baxter Park [23]
2 240.5 9.47 Daisy 1962 Portland Int'l Jetport [22]
3 221.5 8.72 Floyd 1999 Poland [22]
4 209.8 8.26 Donna 1960 Sanford 2 NNW [22]
5 209.3 8.24 Bob 1991 Portland Int'l Jetport [22]
6 193.9 7.61 Hanna 2008 Bar Harbour [22]
7 164.6 6.48 Arthur 2014 Whiting 3 NNE [54]
8 148.6 5.85 Belle 1976 Brunswick [22]
9 141.2 5.56 Gerda 1969 Saco [22]
10 133.4 5.25 Bertha 1996 West Rockport 1 NNW [22]

Maryland[edit]

Eloise's remnants brought great moisture to the Northeast third of the United States in the combination of warm, tropical air and cold air from a cold front. From Virginia through New Jersey, 5 inches (130 mm) of rain were reported, while New York and Pennsylvania experienced 10 inches (250 mm). Westminster, Maryland received the maximum amount from the storm in this region with a total of 14.23 inches (361 mm).[55] The 1935 Labor Day hurricane holds the record for producing the most rainfall in Maryland.[6]

Hurricane Agnes
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Maryland
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 424.2 16.70 Labor Day 1935 hurricane Easton [6]
2 361.4 14.23 Eloise 1975 Westminster 2 SSE [55]
3 346.2 13.63 Lee 2011 Waldorf 3.6 SSE [24]
4 344.4 13.56 Agnes 1972 Westminster 2 SSE [25]
5 337.8 13.30 First August 1928 hurricane Cheltenham [6]
6 329.2 12.96 Irene 2011 Plum Point [23]
7 318.8 12.83 Sandy 2012 Belleview [2]
7 319.8 12.59 Floyd 1999 Chestertown [25]
9 312.9 12.32 Connie 1955 Preston 1 S [25]
10 238.8 9.40 David 1979 Catoctin Mountain Park [25]
10 234.2 9.22 Chesapeake Potomac 1933 Towson [25]

Massachusetts[edit]

The wettest known tropical cyclone to impact New England is also the wettest known for the state of Massachusetts.[2] The flood from Hurricane Diane led to a significant death toll (nearly 200) from Pennsylvania eastward through southern New England.[21]

Hurricane Edouard (1996)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Massachusetts
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 501.7 19.75 Diane 1955 Westfield [6]
2 324.4 12.77 New England Hurricane of 1938 Gardner [2]
3 317.5 12.50 Carrie 1972 Tashmoo [22]
4 312.4 12.3 1933 Outer Banks hurricane Provincetown [6]
5 251.0 9.88 Eloise 1975 Westfield [22]
6 236.7 9.32 Connie 1955 Plainfield [22]
7 231.1 9.10 Irene 2011 Savoy [23]
8 213.36 8.40 Lee 2011 Worthington [56]
9 203.2 8.00 Arthur 2014 New Bedford [57]
10 179.3 7.06 Bob 1991 Westfield [22]

Michigan[edit]

In 1961, Hurricane Carla generated more precipitation in Michigan than any other tropical cyclone has ever generated in the state. Carla is also the wettest tropical cyclone to have hit Iowa, Nebraska, and Wisconsin.[47]

Hurricane Chantal (1989)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants to affect Michigan
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 154.2 6.07 Carla 1961 Boyne Falls [47]
2 136.4 5.37 Chantal 1989 Kent City 2 SW [47]
3 127.5 5.02 Newton 1986 South Haven [47]
4 115.8 4.56 Juan 1985 Escanaba [47]
5 105.2 4.14 Opal 1995 Grosse Pointe Falls [47]
6 103.4 4.07 Fran 1996 Port Huron [47]
7 101.1 3.98 Gustav 2008 Sparta 2 SW [47]
8 85.9 3.38 Frances 1998 Kenton [47]
9 78.0 3.07 Arlene 2005 Hastings [47]
10 78.0 3.07 Gilbert 1988 Charlotte 3 S [47]

Minnesota[edit]

Few tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific or Atlantic Basins make it as far north as Minnesota. Most recently, 2004's Hurricane Javier dropped heavy rainfall exceeding 2 inches (51 mm) in localized spots.[47]

Hurricane Javier (2004)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Minnesota
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 97.3 3.83 Lester 1992 Indus 3 W [47]
2 52.8 2.08 Javier 2004 Bemidji Municipal AP [47]
3 41.9 1.65 Alicia 1983 Montgomery [47]
4 38.1 1.50 Newton 1986 Beaver [47]

Mississippi[edit]

Hurricane Georges stalled over the southern portion of the state, it produced torrential rainfall, exceeding 30 inches (760 mm) locally.[58] The heavy rainfall contributed to significant river overflowing, including the Tchoutacabouffa River at D'Iberville, which set a record crest of 19 feet (5.8 m).[59]

Hurricane Gustav
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Mississippi
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 818.1 32.21 Georges 1998 Wiggins 5 W [49]
2 678.4 26.71 Isaac 2012 Pascagoula [2]
3 535.0 21.06 Unnamed 1987 [2]
4 481.3 18.95 Allison 2001 Liberty 5 W [5]
5 364.0 14.33 Gustav 2008 Chatham [5]
6 344.2 13.55 Lee 2011 Waveland [5]
7 333.5 13.13 Isidore 2002 Poplarville Experimental Stn 5 W [5]
8 319.5 12.58 Danny 1997 Pascagoula 3 NE [5]
9 319.3 12.57 Hilda 1964 McComb Pike County AP [5]
10 307.3 12.1 Tropical Storm Five, 1949 McHenry [6]

Missouri[edit]

Remnant tropical cyclones can move into the state which originate in either the Pacific or Atlantic hurricane basins. Tropical Storm Erin reintensified over Oklahoma leading to heavy rainfall in that state. As the system moved eastward, its surface low quickly dissipated. However, its mid-level circulation remained robust, leading to a burst of heavy rainfall across Missouri exceeding 10 inches (250 mm) in isolated spots, which became the wettest tropical cyclone remnant on record for the state.[25][60]

Tropical Storm Erin (2007)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Missouri
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 302.8 11.94 Erin 2007 Miller [49]
2 291.6 11.48 Bertha 1957 Kennett [16]
3 258.1 10.16 Audrey 1957 Hermann [25]
4 249.4 9.82 Paine 1986 Truman Dam & Reservoir [25]
5 237.2 9.34 Carla 1961 Condordia [25]
6 231.1 9.10 Frances 1998 Odessa 4 SE [25]
7 230.1 9.06 Gustav 2008 Alley Spring/Jack Fork [25]
8 186.7 7.35 Tico 1983 Appleton City [25]
9 168.4 6.63 Waldo 1985 Polo [25]
10 166.9 6.57 Chris 1982 Reynolds [25]

Montana[edit]

It is rare for tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific or Atlantic Basins to make it as far north as Montana. The remains of Kathleen dropped locally heavy rainfall approaching 2 inches (51 mm) in localized spots.[14]

Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Montana
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 48.0 1.89 Kathleen 1976 Lakeview [14]

Nebraska[edit]

The wettest known event in Nebraska to be associated with a tropical cyclone or its remains was Hurricane Carla. Carla resulted in the heaviest known rainfall in several other states as well.[47]

Hurricane Lester (1992)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Nebraska
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 144.3 5.68 Carla 1961 Hubbrell [47]
2 132.1 5.20 Lester 1992 Arnold [47]
3 69.3 2.73 Alicia 1983 Miller [47]
4 49.0 1.93 Tico 1983 Beemer [47]
5 46.7 1.84 Javier 2004 Ainsworth Municipal AP [47]
6 44.5 1.75 Waldo 1985 Falls City Brenner AP [47]
7 23.6 0.93 Newton 1986 Lyman [47]

Nevada[edit]

Every few years, Nevada is impacted by eastern Pacific tropical cyclones, or their remnants. The wettest known event for the state was during Hurricane Doreen, when over 4 inches (100 mm) fell in isolated spots.[14]

Isis 1998
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Nevada
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 105.2 4.14 Doreen 1977 Adaven [14]
2 89.4 3.52 Olivia 1982 Ely Yelland Field [14]
3 86.4 3.40 Kathleen 1976 Searchlight [14]
4 73.7 2.90 Norman 1978 Adaven [14]
5 50.8 2.00 Boris 1990 Lund [14]
6 36.1 1.42 Nora 1997 Valley of Fire State Park [14]
7 32.8 1.29 Isis 1998 Goldfield [14]
8 5.3 0.21 Lester 1992 Montello 2 SE [14]

New Hampshire[edit]

A large swath of heavy rainfall spread up the East Coast along a frontal zone draping over the northern side of Hurricane Floyd.[61] Nearly 10 inches (250 mm) fell across portions of New Hampshire, the most recorded during the passage of a tropical cyclone or its remnants.[22]

Hurricane Floyd
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in New Hampshire
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 242.3 9.54 Floyd 1999 Mount Washington [22]
2 189.7 7.47 Bertha 1996 Mount Washington [22]
3 189.5 7.46 Bob 1991 Mount Washington [22]
4 186.1 7.33 Irene 2011 Pinkham Notch [23]
5 184.2 7.25 Donna 1960 Macdowell Dam [22]
6 182.4 7.18 Connie 1955 Newport [22]
7 168.7 6.64 Lee 2011 Keene 1.7 WSW [24]
8 165.9 6.53 Eloise 1975 Greenville 2 NNE [22]
9 153.7 6.05 Sandy 2012 Randolph 1.4 NE [62]
10 153.2 6.03 Gloria 1985 Mount Washington [22]

New Jersey[edit]

A large swath of heavy rainfall spread up the East Coast along a frontal zone draping over the northern side of Hurricane Floyd.[61] Hurricane Four of the September 1940 hurricane season holds the record for the wettest tropical cyclone in New Jersey.[6]

Floyd (1999) Radar Loop
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in New Jersey
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 609.6 24.00 September 1940 hurricane Ewan [6]
2 452.1 17.80 19 August 1939 Manahawkin, New Jersey [6]
3 358.9 14.13 Floyd 1999 Little Falls [25][49]
4 304.3 11.98 1944 Great Atlantic hurricane New Brunswick Experimental Station [2][25]
5 302.5 11.91 Sandy 2012 Wildwood Crest 0.6 NNE [62]
6 291.6 11.48 Connie 1955 Canistear Reservoir [25]
7 286.3 11.27 Irene 2011 Freehold Township [23]
8 267.0 10.51 Eloise 1975 New Brunswick 3 SE [25]
9 261.4 10.29 Doria 1971 [2][25]
10 242.6 9.55 Lee 2011 Phillipsburg [24]

New Mexico[edit]

Tropical cyclones, and their remnants, move into New Mexico from both the eastern Pacific and Atlantic basins. Although Atlantic Basin tropical cyclones are more unusual events, the rainfall record for New Mexico was from a tropical depression which moved across Texas from the Gulf of Mexico in October 1954.[14]

Isis 1998
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in New Mexico
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 248.9 9.80 Tropical Depression (10/1954) Canton [14]
2 216.7 8.53 Isis 1998 Hobbs [14]
3 216.7 8.53 Dolly 2008 Sunspot [14]
4 169.2 6.66 Waldo 1985 Hobbs [14]
5 134.9 5.31 Octave 1983 Luna RS [14]
6 80.5 3.17 Heather 1977 Yeso 2 S [14]
7 75.9 2.99 Raymond 1989 Red River [14]
8 63.0 2.48 Javier 2004 Albuquerque [14]
9 55.1 2.17 Lester 1992 Lindrith 1 WSW [14]
10 52.1 2.05 Doreen 1977 Florida [14]

New York[edit]

Tropical cyclones moving up the East Coast bring rainfall to New York frequently. During Hurricane Connie, over 13 inches (330 mm) fell in isolated spots, which was the most rainfall recorded with a tropical cyclone or its remains across the state.[23][25]

Hurricane Gloria
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in New York
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 386.1 15.20 Connie 1955 Slide Mountain [6]
2 337.8 13.30 Irene 2011 East Durham [23]
3 331.2 12.25 Floyd 1999 Yorktown Heights 1 W [25]
4 300.5 11.83 Lee 2011 Apalachian [24]
5 282.2 11.11 1944 Great Atlantic hurricane Mineola [25]
6 280.9 11.06 Eloise 1975 Bedford Hills [25]
7 229.9 9.05 Diane 1955 Montauk [25]
8 222.8 8.77 1933 Chesapeake–Potomac hurricane Honk Falls [25]
9 206.2 8.12 Donna 1960 Freeport [25]
10 204.2 8.04 Gloria 1985 Unadilla 2 N [25]

North Carolina[edit]

Heavy rains accompany tropical cyclones and their remnants which move northeast from the Gulf of Mexico coastline, as well as inland from the western subtropical Atlantic ocean. As much as 15% of the rainfall which occurs during the warm season in the Carolinas is attributable to tropical cyclones.[63] Over the past 30 years, the wettest tropical cyclone to strike the coastal plain was Hurricane Floyd of September 1999, which dropped over 24 inches (610 mm) of rainfall north of Southport. In the mountains, Hurricane Frances of September 2004 was nearly as wet, bringing over 23 inches (580 mm) of rainfall to Mount Mitchell.[31]

Hurricane Floyd
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in North Carolina
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 611.1 24.06 Floyd 1999 Southport 5 N [2]
2 602.7 23.73 Mid-July Hurricane 1916 Altapass [30]
3 598.7 23.57 Frances 2004 Mount Mitchell [2]
4 524.5 20.65 Mid-Aug Hurricane 1940 Idlewild [2]
5 505.7 19.91 Dennis 1999 Ocracoke [2]
6 482.1 18.98 Diana 1984 Southport 5 N [2]
7 444.5 17.50 Ophelia 2005 Oak Island Water Treatment Plant [2]
8 431.8 17.00 Ivan 2004 Cruso [2]
9 422.4 16.63 Ione 1955 Maysville 6 SW [2]
10 399.8 15.74 Irene 2011 Bayboro [2]

North Dakota[edit]

It is rare for tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific or Atlantic Basins to migrate as far north as North Dakota. The remains of Javier in 2004 dropped locally heavy rainfall exceeding 1 inch (25 mm) in localized spots.[47]

Hurricane Javier (2004)
Wettest tropical cyclone Remnants in North Dakota
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 34.0 1.34 Javier 2004 Homme Dam [47]

Northern Mariana Islands[edit]

Typhoon Soulik (2006)

The Northern Mariana Islands are an archipelago north of Guam which gets impacted by typhoons in the western Pacific from time to time. Typhoon Steve dropped nearly 20 inches (510 mm) on Saipan in 1993,[64] making it the wettest known tropical cyclone for the island chain.

Wettest tropical cyclones in the Northern Marianas Islands
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 487.68 19.20 Steve 1993 Saipan [64]
2 241.30 9.50 Seth 1991 Saipan [65]
3 205.74 8.10 Soulik 2006 Pagan [66]
4 118.11 4.65 Sanvu 2012 Tinian [67]
5 90.93 3.58 Kong-rey 2007 Pagan [68]
6 85.85 3.38 Mirinae 2009 Rota [69]
7 82.55 3.25 Melor 2009 Tinian [70]
8 50.80 2.00 Dolphin 2008 Guam [71]

Ohio[edit]

The state of Ohio can be impact by the remnants of both eastern Pacific and Atlantic tropical cyclones, with a bulk of the activity originating in the Gulf of Mexico. Hurricane Frederic in 1979, interacting with a nearby frontal zone,[72] brought over 8 inches (200 mm) of rainfall to isolated spots of the state, becoming the wettest known tropical cyclone, or remnant, to impact Ohio.[47]

Hurricane Ivan (2004)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Ohio
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 220.2 8.67 Frederic 1979 Akron 30 E [47]
2 216.7 8.53 Ivan 2004 Albany [47]
3 201.9 7.95 Frances 2004 Mount Ephram [47]
4 178.8 7.04 Sandy 2012 Kirtland 0.9 SW [47]
5 164.3 6.47 Fran 1996 Elyria 3 E [47]
6 157.0 6.18 Katrina 2005 Nashville [47]
7 156.2 6.15 Tico 1983 Ironton 1 NE [47]
8 138.7 5.46 Isidore 2002 New Carlisle [47]
9 126.0 4.96 Claudette 1979 Newark Water Works [47]
10 122.9 4.84 Opal 1995 Dayton International Airport [47]

Oklahoma[edit]

Remnant tropical cyclones can move into the state which originate in either the Pacific or Atlantic hurricane basins. Most recently, Tropical Storm Erin reintensified over Oklahoma leading to heavy rainfall within the state. Rainfall exceeded 12 inches (300 mm) in isolated spots, which turned out to be the third wettest tropical cyclone remnant on record for Oklahoma.[5][60]

Tropical Storm Erin (2007) over Oklahoma
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Oklahoma
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 475.2 18.71 Norma 1981 Kingston 4 SSE [2]
2 430.5 16.95 Tico 1983 Just south of Chickasha [5]
3 325.4 12.81 Erin 2007 Eakly 3 NE [5]
4 306.6 12.07 Dean 1995 Great Salt Plains Dam [5]
5 279.9 11.02 Frances 1998 Valliant 3 W [5]
6 275.3 10.84 Paine 1986 Ponca City Municipal AP [5]
7 218.4 8.60 Gilbert 1988 Wichita Mountain Wildlife Refuge [5]
8 217.7 8.57 Carmen 1974 Flashman Tower [5]
9 208.8 8.22 Delia 1973 Hobart Municipal AP [5]
10 208.3 8.20 Matthew 2004 Tulsa 4 SSE [5]

Oregon[edit]

Impacts from tropical cyclones in the Pacific Northwest are rare.[14] Most recently, the remains of Igancio moved through the region, spurring spotty moderate rainfall across the region.[73]

Ignacio (1997)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Oregon
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 34.3 1.35 Kathleen 1976 Rome 2 NW [14]
2 32.0 1.26 Ignacio 1997 Crater Lake NPS HQ [14]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Although Hurricane Agnes was barely a hurricane at landfall in Florida, its major impact was over the Mid-Atlantic region, where Agnes combined with a non-tropical low to produce widespread rains of 6 to 12 inches (150 to 300 mm) with local amounts up to 19 inches (480 mm) in western Schuylkill County in Pennsylvania.[2] These rains produced widespread severe flooding from Virginia northward to New York, with other flooding occurring over the western portions of the Carolinas.

Hurricane Agnes over Pennsylvania
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Pennsylvania
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 482.6 19.00 Agnes 1972 Western Schuylkill County [25]
2 395.9 15.59 Lee 2011 Elizabethtown [24]
3 337.3 13.28 Chesapeake Potomac 1933 York 3 SSW Pump Station [25]
4 308.1 12.13 Floyd 1999 Marcus Hook [25]
5 306.1 12.05 Connie 1955 Geigertown [25]
6 301.2 11.86 Eloise 1975 Harrisburg Capital City AP [25]
7 282.2 11.11 Diane 1955 Pecks Pond [25]
8 232.9 9.17 Gloria 1985 Valley Forge [25]
9 227.8 8.97 Jeanne 2004 West Chester 2 NW [25]
10 224.0 8.82 Irene 2011 Lafayette [23]

Puerto Rico[edit]

Puerto Rico has seen dramatic rainfall from tropical cyclones and their precursor disturbances. The most recent tropical cyclone-related deluge was from Hurricane Irene in August 2011, when 30.51 inches (775 mm) of rain was measured at Jayuya.[74] The heaviest rainfall noted over the past 30 years was from the precursor disturbance to Tropical Storm Isabel, when 31.67 inches (804 mm) fell at Toro Negro Forest.[75] Hurricane Eloise of 1975 dropped 33.29 inches (846 mm) of rainfall at Dos Bocas, with 23.07 inches (586 mm) falling in 24 hours.

Hurricane Georges
Wettest tropical cyclones on Puerto Rico
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1058.7 41.68 T. D. #19 1970 Jayuya 1 SE [2]
2 846.6 33.29 Eloise 1975 Dos Bocas [2]
3 804.4 31.67 Isabel 1985 Toro Negro Forest [76]
4 776.0 30.51 Georges 1998 Jayuya [2]
5 662.2 26.07 Hazel 1954 Toro Negro Tunnel [77]
6 652.5 25.69 Klaus 1984 Guavate Camp [2]
7 596.4 23.48 Hortense 1996 Cayey 1 NW [2]
8 584.2 23.00 1899 San Ciriaco hurricane Adjuntas [78]
9 560.1 22.05 Irene 2011 Gurabo Abajo [79]
10 504.4 19.86 David 1979 Cidra 3E [2]
11 453.6 17.86 Otto 2010 Ponce 7N [80]

Rhode Island[edit]

The flood from Hurricane Diane led to a significant death toll (nearly 200) from Pennsylvania eastward through southern New England.[21]

Hurricane Bob
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants on Rhode Island
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 309.9 12.2 Tropical Storm Seven, 1932 Westerly [6]
2 214.6 8.45 Diane 1955 Greenville [22]
3 181.1 7.13 Bob 1991 North Foster [22]
4 175.3 6.90 Hurricane Three, 1924 Kingston [6]
5 149.9 5.90 Floyd 1999 North Foster 1 E [22]
6 145.8 5.74 Connie 1955 Kingston [22]
7 137.2 5.40 Lee 2011 Coventry Center [24]
8 136.4 5.37 Irene 2011 Warren [23]
9 133.4 5.25 Allison 2001 North Foster [22]
10 126.2 4.97 Eloise 1975 North Foster 1 E [22]

South Carolina[edit]

Portions of South Carolina experienced significant rainfall totals approaching 19 inches (480 mm) with Tropical Storm Jerry, which became the wettest known tropical cyclone to impact the state.[31][81] The flash flooding covered numerous roadways and washed out bridges, with the statewide transportation damage totaling US$4.5 million. River flooding was great across the state. In addition, the rainfall broke dams, flooded houses, and covered fields, causing a damage total of US$10.1 million.[82]

Hurricane Hugo
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in South Carolina
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 470.2 18.51 Jerry 1995 Antreville [2]
2 443.2 17.45 Beryl 1994 Jocassee 8 WNW [2]
3 358.4 14.11 T. D. #8 1971 Sullivans Island [2]
4 354.6 13.96 Marco/Klaus 1990 Pageland [31]
5 342.1 13.47 Mid-Aug T.S. 1928 Caesars Head [30]
6 321.6 12.66 Southeast hurricane (1940) Charleston, South Carolina [31]
7 318.3 12.53 Okeechobee 1928 Darlington [30]
8 309.1 12.17 Frances 2004 Caesars Head [31]
9 305.3 12.02 Hilda 1964 Caesars Head [31]
10 278.9 10.98 Gaston 2004 Kingstree [31]

South Dakota[edit]

It is rare for tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific or Atlantic Basins to move as far inland as South Dakota. The remains of Javier in 2004 dropped locally heavy rainfall exceeding 2 inches (51 mm) in localized spots.[47]

Hurricane Lester (1992)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in South Dakota
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 83.6 3.29 Lester 1992 Armour [47]
2 71.9 2.83 Javier 2004 Gregory [47]

Tennessee[edit]

Tropical Storm Chris moved inland into the Southeast, producing a burst of rainfall across Tennessee exceeding 13 inches (330 mm).[83] This system stands as Tennessee's wettest known tropical cyclone.[31]

Tropical Storm Chris
Wettest tropical cyclones and remnants in Tennessee
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 345.4 13.60 Chris 1982 Milan [31]
2 332.9 13.11 Lee 2011 Charleston [56]
3 285.8 11.25 Ivan 2004 Soddy Daisy Mowbray Mt [31]
4 267.2 10.52 Isidore 2002 Big Sandy [31]
5 213.1 8.39 Allison 1989 Murfreesboro 5 N [31]
6 185.7 7.31 Gracie 1959 Roan High Knob [31]
7 183.6 7.23 Easy 1950 Point Park Lookout Mountain [31]
8 172.2 6.78 Dennis 2005 Oak Ridge ATDD [31]
9 168.1 6.62 Babe 1977 Chattanooga Lovell Field [31]
10 166.4 6.55 Eloise 1975 Monteagle [31]

Texas[edit]

The most serious threat from tropical cyclones in Texas residents is from flooding, from both Gulf of Mexico hurricanes and tropical storms and the remnants of Eastern Pacific storms. The worst aspect about tropical cyclones is that the weaker they are, the more efficient they can be at producing heavy rains and catastrophic flooding. Systems with sprawling circulations, such as Hurricane Beulah, also tend to make good rainmakers.[84] Slow moving systems, such as Tropical Storm Amelia also can produce significant rainfall over the Lone Star State. Amelia's storm total rainfall is the most recorded within the contiguous United States.[85] Tropical Storm Claudette holds the national 24-hour rainfall record for the United States, with 42 inches (1,100 mm) falling within a day.[86]

Beulah (1967)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Texas
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 1219.2 48.00 Amelia 1978 Medina [2]
2 1143.0 45.00 Claudette 1979 Alvin coop site [86]
3 1033.3 40.68 Allison 2001 Moore Road Detention Pond [2]
4 1008.6 39.71 September Hurricane 1921 Thrall [6]
5 762.0 30.00 September T.S. 1936 Broome [6]
6 755.9 29.76 Unnamed 1960 Port Lavaca #2 [2]
7 695.5 27.38 Beulah 1967 Pettus [2]
8 688.3 27.10 Alice 1954 Pandale [6]
9 660.4 26.00 Fern 1971 Beeville 2 SSE [5]
10 596.9 23.50 Cindy 1963 Deweyville 5 S [5]

United States Virgin Islands[edit]

Hurricane Hortense (1996)

Tropical cyclones affect these islands of the northeast Caribbean on a regular basis. Hurricane Hortense is the wettest known system for the U. S. Virgin Islands, bringing over 18 inches (460 mm) of rainfall.[87]

Wettest tropical cyclones for the United States Virgin Islands
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 458.0 18.03 Hortense 1996 Christiansted Hamilton Field [87]
2 394.5 15.53 Klaus 1984 Caneel Bay Plantation [2]
3 293.4 11.55 David 1979 Fredericksted Fort [88]
4 284.5 11.20 Hugo 1989 Ham Bluff Light House Station [2]
5 265.9 10.47 Lenny 1999 Granard [2]
6 234.2 9.22 Eloise 1975 Annaly [2]
7 224.0 8.82 Kendra 1978 Fredericksted Fort [89]
8 221.2 8.71 Isabel 1985 Annually [2]
9 154.4 6.05 Grace 1997 Wintberg [2]
10 144.0 5.67 Carmen 1974 Cane Bay [90]

Utah[edit]

On occasion, Utah is impacted by the remnants of eastern Pacific tropical cyclones. The remains of Olivia moved through the region in 1982, spurring spotty moderate to heavy rainfall exceeding 7 inches (180 mm) in isolated spots.[14]

Olivia 1982
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Utah
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 188.2 7.41 Olivia 1982 Cottonwood Weir [14]
2 109.5 4.31 Doreen 1977 Logan 5 SW Experimental Farm [14]
3 61.7 2.43 Javier 2004 Monticello 15 ESE [14]
4 59.4 2.34 Boris 1990 Bartholomew Powerhouse [14]
5 56.1 2.21 Nora 1997 Enterprise [14]
6 48.0 1.89 Lester 1992 Cedar City and New Harmony [14]
7 38.6 1.52 Isis 1998 La Verkin [14]
8 33.8 1.33 Kathleen 1976 New Harmony [14]

Vermont[edit]

A large swath over heavy rainfall spread up the East Coast along a frontal zone draped over the northern side of Hurricane Floyd.[61] Over 11 inches (280 mm) fell across portions of Vermont, the most recorded during the passage of a tropical cyclone or its remnants within the state.[22]

Hurricane Erin
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Vermont
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 292.9 11.53 Floyd 1999 Mount Mansfield [22]
2 285.2 11.23 Irene 2011 Mendon [23]
3 209.8 8.26 Connie 1955 Whitingham 1 W [22]
4 170.2 6.70 Erin 1995 Morrisville Stowe State Park [22]
5 167.9 6.61 Lee 2011 Pownal [24]
6 160.8 6.33 Donna 1960 Somerset [22]
7 145.5 5.73 Bertha 1996 Dorset 2 SE [22]
8 126.5 4.98 Chris 1988 Vernon [22]
9 124.7 4.91 Eloise 1975 Vernon [22]
10 113.7 4.48 Able 1950 Searsburg Power Plant [22]

Virginia[edit]

Virginia has some special considerations that affect tropical cyclone-related rainfall. Mountains to the west act as a perfect mechanism for upward motion during sustained east winds, which can lead to flash flooding and landslides in that region (e.g. Hurricane Camille). As a tropical system approaches from the south, a frontal zone sets up between the moist Atlantic Ocean and the drier landmass to the west. This boundary can set up two or three days in advance of a tropical storm, and can lead up to prolonged heavy rains across coastal sections (e.g. Hurricane Floyd). As the cyclone advances north, the boundary will slowly shift west, but progresses west of a Richmond/Washington, D.C. line.[91]

Camille impacting Virginia on August 20, 1969.
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Virginia
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 685.8 27.00 Camille 1969 West-Central Nelson County [25]
2 532.4 20.96 Lee 2011 Colonial Beach [56]
3 513.1 20.20 Isabel 2003 Upper Sherando [2]
4 480.1 18.9 October 1942 T.S. Big Meadows [6]
5 457.2 18.0 Ida 2009 Hampton 1.8 NW [25]
6 444.5 17.50 Southeast hurricane 1940 Keysville [6]
7 431.3 16.98 Floyd 1999 Williamsburg 2 N [25]
8 406.4 16.00 Fran 1996 Big Meadows [2]
9 364.0 14.33 Cleo 1964 Back Bay Wildlife Refuge [2]
10 346.7 13.65 Agnes 1972 Washington Dulles Airport [25]

Washington[edit]

Impacts from tropical cyclones in the Pacific Northwest are rare.[14] The remains of Igancio moved through the region, spurring spotty moderate rainfall across the region.[73]

Ignacio (1997)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Washington
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 18.3 0.72 Ignacio 1997 Merwin Dam [14]

Wisconsin[edit]

Wisconsin experienced its heaviest tropical-cyclone-related rainfall in 1961 when Hurricane Carla entered the United States. Carla broke the record for highest rainfall in three other states as well.[47]

Hurricane Juan (1985)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in Wisconsin
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 192.5 7.58 Carla 1961 Brodhead [47]
2 124.5 4.90 Juan 1985 Marinette [47]
3 95.3 3.75 Frances 1998 Darlington [47]
4 93.2 3.67 Chantal 1989 Port Washington [47]
5 83.8 3.30 Newton 1986 Beloit [47]
6 79.8 3.14 Gustav 2008 Kenosha [47]
7 71.9 2.83 Lester 1992 Blue Mounds 6 SSE [47]
8 71.9 2.83 Unnamed 1960 Eau Pleine Reservoir [47]
9 65.3 2.57 Alicia 1983 Green Bay International Airport [47]

West Virginia[edit]

Although Hurricane Agnes was barely a hurricane at landfall in Florida, its major impact was over the Mid-Atlantic region, where Agnes combined with a non-tropical low to produce widespread heavy rainfall, including amounts approaching 8 inches (200 mm) in isolated spots of West Virginia.[25] These rains produced widespread severe flooding from Virginia northward to New York, with other flooding occurring over the western portions of the Carolinas.

Tropical Storm Beryl (1994)
Wettest tropical cyclones and their remnants in West Virginia
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 201.7 7.94 Agnes 1972 Berkeley Springs [25]
2 180.0 7.09 Lee 2011 Mt. Storm [56]
3 175.3 6.90 Hazel 1954 Mathias [25]
4 174.5 6.87 Eloise 1975 Brushy Run [25]
5 152.9 6.02 Frances 2004 Berkeley Springs [25]
6 141.5 5.57 Gracie 1959 Wardensville RM Farm [25]
7 136.1 5.36 Connie 1955 Kearneysville [25]
8 128.0 5.04 Camille 1969 McRoss [25]
9 118.9 4.68 Beryl 1994 Richwood 1 SSE [25]
10 114.0 4.49 Donna 1960 Thomas [25]

Wyoming[edit]

Few tropical cyclone remnants originating from the eastern Pacific make it as far north as Wyoming. Most recently, Hurricane Javier dropped locally heavy rainfall of up to 2 inches (51 mm) in the higher terrain of western Wyoming.[14]

Javier (2004)
Wettest tropical cyclone remnants in Wyoming
Highest known recorded totals
Precipitation Storm Location Ref
Rank mm in
1 50.80 2.00 Javier 2004 Encampment 19 WNW [14]
2 25.90 1.02 Boris 1990 Bitter Creek 4 NE [14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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