List of world snooker champions

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The World Snooker Championship Trophy

The World Snooker Championship is an annual ranking snooker tournament created in 1927 and since 1977 played at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England. The tournament is played during seventeen days in late April and early May, and is chronologically the third of the three Triple Crown events of the season since 1977/1978, when the UK Championship was first held. The event was not held from 1941 to 1945 because of World War II and 1958 to 1963 due to declining interest.

The governing body that currently organises this event is the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Prior to the WPBSA assuming control of the professional game in 1968, the world championship was organised by the Billiards Association and Control Council (BACC), except for a few years when the players staged their own event, the Professional Matchplay Championship, following a dispute with the organisation.

The most successful player at the World Snooker Championship was Joe Davis, who won fifteen titles between 1927 and 1946 and with this also holds the most consecutive titles won. The record in the modern era is held by Stephen Hendry, who won the title between 1990 and 1999 seven times. The current champion is Mark Selby, who has won the title once.

Champions[edit]

Format Organiser
Knockout tournament BACC
Defending champion received a bye to the final † BACC
Professional Matchplay Championships ◊ Independent
Challenge matches ‡ BACC
Knockout tournament (modern era) WPBSA

[1][2][3][4][5]

Statistics[edit]

Multiple champions[edit]

Title defended in a challenge match
Professional Matchplay Championship title[d]
Competed in 2014
Player Total Years
England Joe Davis 15 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1946
England Fred Davis 8 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956
England John Pulman 1957, 1964, 1964, 1965, 1965, 1965, 1966, 1968
Scotland Stephen Hendry 7 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1999
Wales Ray Reardon 6 1970, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1978
England Steve Davis 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1989
England Ronnie O'Sullivan 5 2001, 2004, 2008, 2012, 2013
Scotland John Higgins 4 1998, 2007, 2009, 2011
England John Spencer 3 1969, 1971, 1977
Scotland Walter Donaldson 2 1947, 1950
Northern Ireland Alex Higgins 1972, 1982
Wales Mark Williams 2000, 2003

Champions by country[edit]

Country Players Total First title Last title
 England 11 50 1927 2014
 Scotland 4 14 1947 2011
 Wales 3 9 1970 2003
 Northern Ireland 2 3 1972 1985
 Australia 2 2 1952 2010
 Canada 1 1 1980 1980
 Republic of Ireland 1 1 1997 1997

Notes[edit]

  • a Due to a disagreement with the Billiards Association and Control Club, Lindrum and McConachy were the only players to compete, with most professional players playing in the Professional Matchplay Championship instead. As a result, Lindrum's title win is often ignored, with Cliff Thorburn (Canada), Ken Doherty (Ireland) and Neil Robertson (Australia) usually regarded as the only non-British World Champions.[4]
  • b1 b2 The title was decided over a series of matches rather than frames.[9]
  • c Stephen Hendry became the youngest World Champion at the final on 29 April 1990, aged 21 years, 106 days.
  • d The Guinness Book of World Records does not acknowledge the Professional Matchplay Championship results in its records, so accordingly only lists Fred Davis as having won the World Championship three times, and John Pulman seven times.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Turner, Chris. "World Professional Championship". cajt.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk. Chris Turner's Snooker Archive. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2011. 
  2. ^ "World Championship – Roll of Honour". Global Snooker. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 18 March 2013. 
  3. ^ "Hall of Fame". Snooker.org. Retrieved 24 February 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "History of the World Snooker Championship". worldsnooker.com. World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association. Retrieved 30 April 2011. 
  5. ^ "Embassy World Championship". Snooker Scene. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 9 May 2012. 
  6. ^ Hayton, Eric (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. p. 144. ISBN 0-9548549-0-X. 
  7. ^ "Davis retains snooker title". The Argus. 8 March 1954. Retrieved 8 May 2013. 
  8. ^ Hayton, Eric (2004). The CueSport Book of Professional Snooker. Lowestoft: Rose Villa Publications. p. 11. ISBN 0-9548549-0-X. 
  9. ^ Everton, Clive (1981). Guinness Book of Snooker. Enfield: Guinness Superlatives. p. 65. ISBN 0-85112-230-2.