Listed buildings in Runcorn (rural area)

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A square castellated tower viewed from one corner, with its front, incorporating a clock and an arched entrance, in shadow. The main church building, about half the height of the tower, is to the right and is connected to the tower.
All Saints' Church, Daresbury,
listed at Grade II*

Runcorn is a small industrial town in the borough of Halton, Cheshire, England. This list contains the 26 listed buildings in the part of the borough lying to the south of the River Mersey outside the urban area of Runcorn. The area covered includes the villages of Clifton, Daresbury, Preston Brook, Preston on the Hill, and Moore. Three of the buildings in the area are classified by English Heritage as Grade II*, and 23 are Grade II; there are no buildings in Grade I. In the United Kingdom, the term listed building refers to a building or other structure officially designated as being of special architectural, historical, or cultural significance. These buildings are in three grades: Grade I consists of buildings of outstanding architectural or historical interest; Grade II* includes particularly significant buildings of more than local interest; Grade II consists of buildings of special architectural or historical interest. Buildings in England are listed by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on recommendations provided by English Heritage, which also determines the grading.[1]

Although the urban area of Runcorn grew rapidly during the Industrial Revolution, and again with the growth of the New Town during the 1960s and 70s, the surrounding area, mainly to the west of the town, has experienced only a small growth in population. The villages are small and discrete, and are separated by farmland and woodland. The area covered by the list is crossed by roads, railways, and canals, with which some of the listed buildings are associated. The oldest of these are the canals: the Bridgewater Canal, the Trent and Mersey Canal, the Weaver Navigation and the Manchester Ship Canal. The railways consist of the West Coast Main Line – the section between Crewe and Warrington, and the branch to Liverpool – and the Chester-Manchester Line. The major roads are the M56 motorway and the A6 road, together with sections of the A533, the A557 and the A558 roads.

The ages of the structures on the list range from the ruin of Clifton Hall, built in 1565, to the telephone kiosk in Daresbury, which dates from the 1930s. The three Grade II* listed buildings include the only church in the list and two former mansion houses. The church and one of the mansion houses are in Daresbury, and the other mansion house is in Moore. Daresbury also contains a former sessions house. Moore reflects its rural past with two farmhouses and a number of cottages. Also in the village of Moore are a public house, a former school, and a bridge over the Bridgewater Canal. Preston Brook stands on the junction of the Bridgewater and the Trent and Mersey Canals; other than one listed house, the structures are associated with the canals – a former warehouse, a tunnel entrance, a milepost, and two air shafts. Other listed buildings are in more isolated sites and include another farmhouse, another canal bridge, a swing bridge over the Manchester Ship Canal, and a railway viaduct over the Weaver Navigation and A557 road.

Key[edit]

Grade Criteria[1]
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest
"—" denotes a work that is not listed.

Listed buildings[edit]

Name Photograph Grade Date Location Description
All Saints' Church Photograph of the church from the south, showing the tower and part of the south aisle, partly obstructed by trees II* 16th century and 1871 Daresbury
53°20′26″N 2°37′52″W / 53.3406°N 2.6312°W / 53.3406; -2.6312 (All Saints' Church, Daresbury)
The parish church of Daresbury was rebuilt in 1871, and retains its 16th-century tower. It is built in red sandstone with a slate roof. Lewis Carroll was born in the vicarage; a stained-glass window in the church depicts characters from his books.[2][3]
Moore Hall
Photograph of the three-storey hall, painted white, framed by trees
II* Early 18th century Moore
53°21′15″N 2°37′52″W / 53.3542°N 2.6311°W / 53.3542; -2.6311 (Moore Hall)
Built in rendered brick with a slate roof, this former mansion house has five bays and three storeys, rusticated quoins and a cornice at the second-floor level.[4][5]
Daresbury Hall Photograph of the Georgian style hall in three storeys, showing three bays with three windows in the central bay and two windows in each of the lateral bays II* 1759 Daresbury
53°20′17″N 2°37′33″W / 53.3380°N 2.6257°W / 53.3380; -2.6257 (Daresbury Hall)
This former mansion house is built in brown brick with a slate roof in three storeys and three bays. It incorporates a stone plinth and floor bands, rusticated giant pilasters and matching stone quoins.[3][6]
Clifton Hall A ruined sandstone wall seen in the distance across a field, including a pair of gateposts on the left. II 1565 Cholmondeley Road, Clifton
53°18′57″N 2°42′51″W / 53.3159°N 2.7141°W / 53.3159; -2.7141 (Clifton Hall)
Once the second-largest house in Cheshire, this former Elizabethan mansion is now a ruin and only fragments of sandstone walling remain.[7][8][9]
Manor Farm House A brick and sandstone house near a road, with two gables and a dormer window, all timber framed. II 1660 129 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′13″N 2°38′16″W / 53.3536°N 2.6379°W / 53.3536; -2.6379 (Manor Farm House)
This former farm house has been heavily restored. It is constructed in sandstone, brick and timber framing, and has a tile roof. It is in two storeys and three bays, and has a west gabled projection.[10]
Village Farm House A sandstone house behind a pair of ornamental gateposts (which are listed separately) II Late 17th century with later alterations 128 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′13″N 2°38′14″W / 53.3537°N 2.6371°W / 53.3537; -2.6371 (Village Farm House)
Built in stone with a stone-slate roof in two storeys with an attic, this former farm house originally had four bays but the original window openings have been built up and new windows inserted.[5][11]
Red Lion public house A cream-coloured public house with window boxes in front of which are picnic-type tables. II Late 17th century with later alterations Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′12″N 2°38′12″W / 53.3533°N 2.6366°W / 53.3533; -2.6366 (Red Lion public house)
This public house is built in whitened brick with a slate roof in two storeys with bays. It has an arched entrance with a blank fanlight.[12]
Black Jane farm house A symmetrical Georgian style, brick-built farmhouse in five bays with a short wing on each side. II 1729 Newton Lane, Daresbury
53°19′22″N 2°36′22″W / 53.3228°N 2.6060°W / 53.3228; -2.6060 (Black Jane farm house)
This farm house is constructed in brown brick with a slate roof. It has two storeys and five bays with later additions. It includes stone flush quoins and a timber doorcase.[13]
Old Farm House Cottages A brick building by a road, asymmetrical with a blue door at the front of the right-hand cottage. II 1758 110–112 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′13″N 2°38′08″W / 53.3535°N 2.6355°W / 53.3535; -2.6355 (Old Farm House Cottages)
Built in brown brick with a slate roof, this pair of cottages is in two storeys plus an attic with three bays. The original door to No. 112 has been replaced by a window that matches the others.[14]
George Gleave's bridge The bridge spans the canal with a footpath on the left and trees on each flank. II c. 1772 Near Daresbury
53°20′13″N 2°38′47″W / 53.33705°N 2.64651°W / 53.33705; -2.64651 (George Gleave's bridge)
This is an accommodation bridge connecting two fields, crossing the Bridgewater Canal. It is built in red brick with ashlar sandstone dressings and consists of a single-span segmental arch.[15]
Moore bridge The bridge crosses the canal with a wide footpath on the left and long boats visible through the arch. II c. 1772 Moore
53°21′16″N 2°37′55″W / 53.3544°N 2.6319°W / 53.3544; -2.6319 (Moore bridge)
This is a road bridge over the Bridgewater Canal built in red brick with a stone carriageway and parapet. It is steeply humped and is wide enough for only one vehicle.[16]
Former warehouse A brick building by the canal with three storeys and a loading bay on the left protruding towards the canal. II c. 1772 Preston Brook
53°19′07″N 2°38′55″W / 53.3185°N 2.6485°W / 53.3185; -2.6485 (Former warehouse)
Standing alongside the Bridgewater Canal, this former warehouse is built in brick with a slate roof. It has been converted into residential use. It has three storeys with seven widely spaced window bays on the east side and four additional gabled loading bays on the west.[17]
Preston Brook Tunnel north entrance The canal enters the tunnel through and arch and on the right a road curves towards the left to cross the bridge. II c. 1777 Preston Brook
53°18′52″N 2°38′47″W / 53.3144°N 2.6463°W / 53.3144; -2.6463 (Preston Brook Tunnel north entrance)
This is the entrance to the tunnel linking the south end of the Bridgewater Canal with the Trent and Mersey Canal. It is built in red brick with stone dressings.[18]
Canal air shaft (north)
A cylindrical brick structure almost surrounded by vegetation.
II c. 1777 Preston Brook
53°18′50″N 2°38′46″W / 53.3139°N 2.6460°W / 53.3139; -2.6460 (Canal air shaft (north))
Located towards the northern end of the tunnel carrying the Trent and Mersey Canal, this is the top of an air shaft. It is circular, built in blue brick, 6 feet (2 m) in diameter, and 6 feet (2 m) high.[19]
Canal air shaft (south)
A cylindrical brick structure standing by a footpath.
II c. 1777 Preston Brook
53°18′40″N 2°38′41″W / 53.3112°N 2.6446°W / 53.3112; -2.6446 (Canal air shaft (south))
Towards the southern end of the tunnel carrying the Trent and Mersey Canal, the top of this air shaft is circular, built in blue brick, 6 feet (2 m) in diameter, and 9 feet (3 m) high.[20]
Ivy Cottage A brick house with four sash windows and a green front door. II Mid 18th century 106 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′13″N 2°38′05″W / 53.3536°N 2.6348°W / 53.3536; -2.6348 (Ivy Cottage)
The house is constructed of brown brick with a slate roof in two storeys with three bays. It has a stone doorcase with Tuscan columns, and an open pediment with an arched blank tympanum.[21]
The Pebbles
A brick house with four sash windows and one window bricked up.
II Mid 18th century 109 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′12″N 2°38′09″W / 53.3533°N 2.6358°W / 53.3533; -2.6358 (The Pebbles)
This house is built in brown brick with a concrete tile roof in two storeys with three bays. It has a stone doorcase with Tuscan columns, and an open pediment with an arched blank tympanum. The opening for the centre window in the first floor is blank.[22]
Brook House A long cottage in two storeys with tall chimneys and windows with intricate white-painted tracery. II Late 18th century Preston Brook
53°19′17″N 2°39′01″W / 53.3215°N 2.6504°W / 53.3215; -2.6504 (Brook House)
In Gothic style, this cottage is built in whitened brick with a slate roof. It is in two storeys with four bays, plus one bay added to the south. The windows have lozenge glazing.[23]
Roselea and Briardene Cottages in two storeys by the road behind a hedge, with a single tall central chimney. II Late 18th century Moss Lane, Moore
53°21′22″N 2°38′14″W / 53.3562°N 2.6373°W / 53.3562; -2.6373 (Roselea and Briardene)
This pair of cottages is built in brown brick in two storeys with four bays. It has a roof of "very large" slates, and the original three-light horizontal-sliding sash windows are still present.[24]
Canal mile post
A black post supports a plaque which says on the left "Shardlow 92 miles" and on the right "Preston Brook".
II 1819 Preston Brook
53°18′47″N 2°38′46″W / 53.313°N 2.646°W / 53.313; -2.646 (Canal mile post)
This is the mile post near the north end of the Trent and Mersey Canal showing the distance to the terminus at Shardlow as "92 miles" (which is 148 km). It is made in cast iron, painted black and white, and consists of a circular post with a moulded head and embossed letters on two convex tablets.[25]
Sessions house A symmetrical single-storey brick building with a central white tablet almost the height of the building, windows with complex tracery on each side, and, in the front, picnic-type tables and a menu board. II 1841 Daresbury
53°20′27″N 2°37′59″W / 53.3408°N 2.6331°W / 53.3408; -2.6331 (Sessions house)
This is a former sessions house that is now used by the adjoining public house. It is built in red brick with a slate roof, in one storey with three bays. The middle bay has a plastered recess containing a tablet with a Latin inscription giving the purpose and date of the building.[3][26]
Sutton Weaver viaduct
A brick arch over a road, with the start of an iron arch on the left.
II 1848–50 Clifton Road, Sutton Weaver
53°18′21″N 2°42′05″W / 53.3059°N 2.7014°W / 53.3059; -2.7014 (Sutton Weaver viaduct)
The Chester-Manchester railway line crosses the A557 road and the Weaver Navigation on this viaduct, which has a cast iron span and brick abutments.[27]
Former primary school A single-storey brick building with a gable on the front, a door on the side and a short wall and a hedge in front. II 1878 Moss Lane, Moore
53°21′17″N 2°38′09″W / 53.3547°N 2.6357°W / 53.3547; -2.6357 (Former primary school)
This was a primary school built in brown brick with stone dressings and a stone slate roof. It is in a single storey with four bays in an "L" plan. In the front gable is a crest containing three carved birds.[28]
Swing bridge A metal swing bridge on the left over the canal, a metal pylon in the middle and brick support buildings on the right. II c. 1878 Moore Lane, Moore
53°21′47″N 2°38′06″W / 53.3630°N 2.6351°W / 53.3630; -2.6351 (Moore Lane swing bridge)
This swing bridge crosses the Manchester Ship Canal and is operated from the north bank by hydraulic water power. The support buildings are of red brickwork with slate roofs.[29]
Gate piers, gate and side walls The ornamental gate piers, the metal gate and the sandstone side walls in front of the farmhouse. II 19th century 128 Runcorn Road, Moore
53°21′13″N 2°38′14″W / 53.3536°N 2.6371°W / 53.3536; -2.6371 (Gate piers, gate and sidewalls, 128 Runcorn Road)
The gate piers of Village Farm House are made from yellow sandstone. They are in Jacobean Revival style and hold a wrought iron screen with overthrows.[30]
Telephone kiosk
A telephone kiosk painted bright red with a post box and flowers tubs behind.
II 1935 Chester Road, Daresbury
53°20′26″N 2°37′58″W / 53.340636°N 2.632830°W / 53.340636; -2.632830 (Telephone kiosk)
This type K6 telephone kiosk was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. It is made in cast iron and is painted red. It is included in the list because of its group value with All Saints' church and the sessions house.[31]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b Listed buildings, English Heritage, retrieved 23 April 2011 
  2. ^ "Church of All Saints, Daresbury", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  3. ^ a b c Hartwell et al. 2011, p. 325
  4. ^ "Moore Hall", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  5. ^ a b Hartwell et al. 2011, p. 486
  6. ^ "Daresbury Hall", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  7. ^ "Remains of Rocksavage", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  8. ^ Starkey, H. F. (1990), Old Runcorn, Halton Borough Council, pp. 73–77 
  9. ^ Hartwell et al. 2011, p. 291
  10. ^ "Manor Farm House, 129 Runcorn Road, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  11. ^ "Village Farm House, 128 Runcorn Road, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  12. ^ "The Red Lion Public House, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  13. ^ "Black Jane Farm House", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  14. ^ "Old Farm House Cottages, 110–112 Runcorn Road, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  15. ^ "Bridgewater Canal George Gleave's Bridge", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  16. ^ "Moore Bridge", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  17. ^ "The Old Number One", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  18. ^ "Preston Brook Tunnel Entrance", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  19. ^ "Northern Air Shaft to Preston Brook Tunnel", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  20. ^ "Preston Brook Tunnel air shaft north west of Talbot Arms public house", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  21. ^ "Ivy Cottage, 106 Runcorn Road, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  22. ^ "The Pebbles, 109 Runcorn Road, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  23. ^ "Brook House, Preston Brook", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  24. ^ "Roselea and Briardene cottages, Moore", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  25. ^ "Trent and Mersey Canal canal milepost south of north entrance to Preston Brook Tunnel", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  26. ^ "The Sessions House, Daresbury", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  27. ^ "Frodsham Viaduct number 54", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  28. ^ "Moore Old Primary School", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  29. ^ "Moore Lane Bridge", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  30. ^ "Gate piers, gate and sidewalls to Village Farmhouse", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 
  31. ^ "Telephone kiosk, Daresbury, at junction with Chester Road", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), retrieved 23 April 2011 

Sources