Little Falls, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Little Falls, New Jersey
Township
Township of Little Falls
Little Falls Town Hall
Little Falls Town Hall
Map of Little Falls Township in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Little Falls Township in Passaic County. Inset: Location of Passaic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Little Falls, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Little Falls, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°52′34″N 74°13′08″W / 40.876235°N 74.218886°W / 40.876235; -74.218886Coordinates: 40°52′34″N 74°13′08″W / 40.876235°N 74.218886°W / 40.876235; -74.218886[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Passaic
Incorporated April 2, 1868
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Darlene Post (term ends December 31, 2013)[3]
 • Administrator Joanne Bergin[4]
 • Clerk William Wilk[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.810 sq mi (7.277 km2)
 • Land 2.735 sq mi (7.084 km2)
 • Water 0.075 sq mi (0.193 km2)  2.65%
Area rank 351st of 566 in state
14th of 16 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 157 ft (48 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 14,432
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 14,472
 • Rank 175th of 566 in state
7th of 16 in county[11]
 • Density 5,276.2/sq mi (2,037.2/km2)
 • Density rank 103rd of 566 in state
7th of 16 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07424[12]
Area code(s) 862/973
FIPS code 3403140620[13][2][14]
GNIS feature ID 0882313[15][2]
Website www.lfnj.com

Little Falls is a township in Passaic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 census, the township's population was 14,432,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 3,577 (+33.0%) from the 10,855 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 439 (-3.9%) from the 11,294 counted in the 1990 Census.[16] It is located about 15 miles (24 km) from New York City.

Little Falls was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 2, 1868, from portions of Acquackanonk Township. On March 25, 1914, portions of the township were taken to form the borough of West Paterson (now Woodland Park).[17]

The Morris Canal, once an important artery of trade and transportation between the Delaware and Hudson rivers, wound its way through the town, and vestiges of it still remain.

Geography[edit]

Little Falls is located at 40°52′34″N 74°13′08″W / 40.876235°N 74.218886°W / 40.876235; -74.218886 (40.876235,-74.218886). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 2.810 square miles (7.277 km2), of which, 2.735 square miles (7.084 km2) of it is land and 0.075 square miles (0.193 km2) of it (2.65%) is water.[2][1]

The township has three main sub-divisions. Great Notch is the easternmost part of Little Falls. The downtown area is frequently referred to as "The Center of Town", mainly by longtime residents, and is usually referred to as simply Little Falls. Singac is in the westernmost portion of the township. Much of Singac borders the Passaic River.[18]

Singac (with a 2010 Census population of 3,618[19]) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Little Falls Township.[20][21][22]

Little Falls is bordered by the communities of Montclair, Wayne, Cedar Grove, Woodland Park, Totowa, North Caldwell, Fairfield and Clifton.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,282
1880 1,404 9.5%
1890 1,890 34.6%
1900 2,908 53.9%
1910 3,750 29.0%
1920 5,161 * 37.6%
1930 5,161 0.0%
1940 5,368 4.0%
1950 6,405 19.3%
1960 9,730 51.9%
1970 11,727 20.5%
1980 11,496 −2.0%
1990 11,294 −1.8%
2000 10,855 −3.9%
2010 14,432 33.0%
Est. 2012 14,472 [10] 0.3%
Population sources: 1870-1920[23]
1870[24][25] 1880-1890[26]
1890-1910[27] 1910-1930[28]
1930-1990[29] 2000[30][31] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previsous decade.[17]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 14,432 people, 4,740 households, and 2,825 families residing in the township. The population density was 5,276.2 per square mile (2,037.2 /km2). There were 4,925 housing units at an average density of 1,800.5 per square mile (695.2 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.68% (12,510) White, 4.11% (593) Black or African American, 0.15% (22) Native American, 4.56% (658) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 2.38% (344) from other races, and 2.11% (304) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 9.89% (1,428) of the population.[7]

There were 4,740 households, of which 22.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.4% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.04.[7]

In the township, 13.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 29.4% from 18 to 24, 21.0% from 25 to 44, 22.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.1 years. For every 100 females there were 81.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,318 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,244) and the median family income was $92,462 (+/- $12,925). Males had a median income of $67,585 (+/- $7,860) versus $42,270 (+/- $3,385) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,505 (+/- $3,336). About 4.7% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.1% of those under age 18 and 10.2% of those age 65 or over.[32]

Same-sex couples headed 42 households in 2010.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[13] there were 10,855 people, 4,687 households, and 2,873 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,941.8 people per square mile (1,524.1/km2). There were 4,797 housing units at an average density of 1,742.0 per square mile (673.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 92.13% white, 0.65% African American, 0.06% Native American, 4.20% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.33% from other races, and 1.60% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.33% of the population.[30][31]

There were 4,687 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.7% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.99.[30][31]

In the township the population was spread out with 18.1% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.[30][31]

The median income for a household in the township was $58,857, and the median income for a family was $70,223. Males had a median income of $49,136 versus $37,727 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,242. About 2.8% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.8% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.[30][31]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

For most of its history, Little Falls was governed by a township committee consisting of five committee members elected by the voters. Under this system, a chairman (mayor) and deputy-chair (deputy mayor) were selected annually by the Township Committee members. Effective January 1, 2005, this form of government was changed by a public referendum to a mayor-council form authorized by the Faulkner Act. Under the new government, the voters directly elect the mayor to a four-year term, and the five township council members to four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election in even years.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Little Falls is Darlene Post, whose term of office ends on December 31, 2016. Members of the Township Council are Council President John Vantuno (2014), Louis Fontana (2016), Mercedes Gonzalez (2014), Pam Porter (2016) and Joseph Rento (2014, serving the balance of a vacancy).[34]

Post won election to a full four-year term as mayor in the 2012 general election, along with all three of her Republican running mates for Township Council; Louis Fontana, Pamela Porter and Joseph Rento (who won the balance of an unexpired term of office).[35]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Little Falls is located in the 11th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[8][37][38] Prior to the 2010 Census, Little Falls had been part of the 8th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[39]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[45] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[46] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[47]

Passaic County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected to staggered three-year terms office on an at-large basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year.[48] As of 2013, Passaic County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Bruce James (D, term ends December 31, 2014; Clifton),[49] Freeholder Deputy Director Theodore O. Best Jr. (D, 2014; Paterson),[50] John W. Bartlett (D, 2015; Wayne), Ronda Cotroneo (D, 2015; Ringwood), Terry Duffy (D, 2013; West Milford),[51] Pat Lepore (D, 2013; Woodland Park)[52] and Hector C. Lora (D, 2015; Passaic).[53][54] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Kristin M. Corrado (2014),[55] Sheriff Richard H. Berdnik[56] and Surrogate Bernice Toledo.[57]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 7,632 registered voters in Little Falls, of which 2,084 (27.3% vs. 31.0% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,800 (23.6% vs. 18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 3,745 (49.1% vs. 50.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[58] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 52.9% (vs. 53.2% in Passaic County) were registered to vote, including 61.3% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 70.8% countywide).[58][59]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,908 votes here (49.5% vs. 37.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,734 votes (46.5% vs. 58.8%) and other candidates with 65 votes (1.1% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,879 ballots cast by the township's 7,835 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.0% (vs. 70.4% in Passaic County).[60] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,994 votes here (50.6% vs. 42.7% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,723 votes (46.0% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 47 votes (0.8% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,921 ballots cast by the township's 7,798 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.9% (vs. 69.3% in the whole county).[61]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,936 votes here (51.3% vs. 43.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,577 votes (41.8% vs. 50.8%), Independent Chris Daggett with 183 votes (4.8% vs. 3.8%) and other candidates with 39 votes (1.0% vs. 0.9%), among the 3,775 ballots cast by the township's 7,552 registered voters, yielding a 50.0% turnout (vs. 42.7% in the county).[62]

Education[edit]

For public school, students in kindergarten through eighth grade are educated by the Little Falls Township Public Schools. Schools in the district (with 2010–11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[63]) are Little Falls School #2[64] with 318 students in grades kindergarten through two; Little Falls School #3[65] with 203 students in grades three and four; and Little Falls School #1[66] with 405 students in grades five through eight.[67]

For grades nine through twelve, students in public school attend Passaic Valley Regional High School, which also serves students from Totowa and Woodland Park. The school facility is located in Little Falls.[68]

Most of Montclair State University is located in Little Falls. During 2011, the university employed 66 residents on a full or part-time basis, who earned almost $3.5 million in total.[69]

Transportation[edit]

Little Falls is criss-crossed by several major roadways, including U.S. Route 46 and New Jersey Route 23. The Garden State Parkway and Interstate 80 run near the municipality.

The Little Falls and Montclair State University Stations of the New Jersey Transit both serve Little Falls, offering service on the Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal in Hoboken, New Jersey, or from Montclair State University Station on Midtown Direct trains to New York City's Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan via the Secaucus Junction. The township was formerly served by the Great Notch Station until NJ Transit closed it in January 2010 because of low ridership.[70]

NJ Transit bus transportation is offered to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 191, 194 and 195 routes. Newark, New Jersey, is served by the 11, 28 (on Saturdays and Sundays) and on the 75 routes. Local routes are the 704 and 705 lines.[71]

Little Falls is approximately 21 miles (34 km) from Newark Liberty International Airport and approximately 27 miles (43 km) from LaGuardia Airport in Flushing, Queens, New York.

Sports[edit]

The New Jersey Jackals of the Canadian American Association of Professional Baseball (CanAm League) play at Yogi Berra Stadium, located in Little Falls.[72]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Little falls include:

In popular culture[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Township Directory, Township of Little Falls. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 169.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Little Falls, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Little Falls township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Little Falls township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Little Falls, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  13. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  15. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  17. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 209. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  18. ^ Spiewak, Anna. "One Hometown You Won't Want To Leave". The Record, January 20, 2008. Accessed February 29, 2008. "The township is divided into three sections: Little Falls; Singac, off Route 23; and Great Notch, off Long Hill & Ridge Roads."
  19. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Singac CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  20. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 12, 2013.
  21. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 12, 2013.
  22. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed January 12, 2013.
  23. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  24. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 274, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed January 13, 2013. "Little Falls contains a population of 1,282"
  25. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  26. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  27. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 27.
  30. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Little Falls township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Little Falls township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  32. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Little Falls township, Passaic County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  33. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed July 26, 2013.
  34. ^ Elected Officials Township of Little Falls. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  35. ^ Kadosh, Matthew. "Little Falls Republicans secure mayor, council seats", Passaic Valley Today, November 7, 2012. Accessed January 13, 2013. "Republican Mayor Darlene Post kept her position as the township's top official and three Republican candidates won council seats on Tuesday.... Republican Councilwoman Pamela Porter received 2,293 votes, or about 18.5 percent of the electorate. Republican Council President Louis Fontana received 2,206 votes, or about 17.8 percent of the electorate. Republican Councilman Joseph Rento received 2,164 votes, or about 17.5 percent of the electorate."
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  39. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  46. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  47. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ Clerk-Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  49. ^ Bruce James, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  50. ^ Theodore O. Best Jr., Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  51. ^ Terry Duffy, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  52. ^ Pat Lepore, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  53. ^ Freeholders, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  54. ^ Patberg, Zach. "Democrats take full control of Passaic County freeholder board", The Record (Bergen County), January 4, 2013. Accessed January 9, 2013. "Ronda Casson Cotroneo, a family law attorney, wants [to] establish a program that links lawyers and counselors with victims of domestic violence. John Bartlett, also a lawyer, imagines more parks, calling them the county’s 'undiscovered gem.'... Lora, a Passaic city councilman, says better communication with constituents is the key to good government, whether through handshakes or social media."
  55. ^ County Clerk, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  56. ^ Richard H. Berdnik, Passaic County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  57. ^ County Surrogate, Passaic County, New Jersey. Accessed January 9, 2013.
  58. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Passaic, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  59. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  60. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  61. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  62. ^ 2009 Governor: Passaic County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed January 16, 2013.
  63. ^ School Data for the Little Falls Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 13, 2013.
  64. ^ Little Falls School #2, Little Falls Township Public Schools. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  65. ^ Little Falls School #3, Little Falls Township Public Schools. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  66. ^ Little Falls School #1, Little Falls Township Public Schools. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  67. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Little Falls Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed August 5, 2013.
  68. ^ District Information, Passaic Valley High School. Accessed March 18, 2011. "The regional district which is served by Passaic Valley High School is comprised of the communities of Little Falls, Totowa Borough and Woodland Park."
  69. ^ Montclair State in the Community: Little Falls, Montclair State University. Accessed August 5, 2013. "Montclair State can take pride in its rich history of bold educational innovation and vital service to the state, including an array of concrete benefits to its two host counties of Passaic and Essex and its four host communities of Little Falls, Montclair, Clifton, and Bloomfield: economic benefits, educational benefits, and community-service benefits."
  70. ^ Cunningham, Jennifer H. "It's end of the line for Great Notch station", The Record (Bergen County), January 3, 2010. Accessed August 5, 2013. "The 104-year-old Great Notch train station is set to close Jan. 16 because of 'anemic' ridership, NJ Transit officials said."
  71. ^ Passaic County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 27, 2010. Accessed August 27, 2012.
  72. ^ New Jersey Jackals, Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball. Accessed July 27, 2008.
  73. ^ Finn, Holly (September 25, 2003). "Through The Plexiglass Darkly — David Blaine Exposes Britain's Nasty Underbelly". The Times. p. 20. "Home to Blaine is Little Falls, New Jersey — where there is a museum honouring Yogi Berra, the legendary Yankee baseball player. He's the one who said 'It ain't over til it's over.' It sure ain't."
  74. ^ Sharkey, Joe. "JERSEY;Their Son, the Writer, Finally Tells All", The New York Times, June 2, 1996. Accessed August 27, 2012. "As it turned out, you could take the boy out of Little Falls, but you couldn't take Little Falls out of the boy. Now, at 33, Frank DeCaro forgets nothing about growing up gay in Little Falls, and tells all in his first book, A Boy Named Phyllis: A Suburban Memoir (Viking)."
  75. ^ Jackson, Vincent. "YEAR-END HOOPLA / ATLANTIC CITY CASINOS OFFER WIDE VARIETY OF SHOWS FOR NEW YEAR'S EVE", The Press of Atlantic City, December 21, 1997. Accessed August 31, 2011. "Kit McClure, a native of Little Falls, Passaic County, is making her Atlantic City debut with her 12-piece, all- female band inside the Theater. "
  76. ^ Staff. "TO GET HIGHEST AWARD", The New York Times, October 2, 1945. Accessed March 18, 2011. "Marine Pfc. Franklin E. Sigler, Little Falls, N.J., will receive the Congressional Medal of Honor from President Truman in Washington on Friday."
  77. ^ Star Ledger, Newark, NJ, obituary (Nov. 16, 1986).
  78. ^ The Sopranos location guide
  79. ^ Hamill, Pete. "Gleason's Second Honeymoon: Still the Greatest", New York (magazine), September 23, 1985. Accessed January 13, 2013. "By 1937, Gleason was moving around... playing for a few weeks at Frank donato's Colonial Inn in Singac...."

External links[edit]