Little Malcolm

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Little Malcolm
Little Malcolm FilmPoster.jpeg
DVD cover
Directed by Stuart Cooper
Produced by George Harrison
Gavrik Losey
Written by David Halliwell (play)
Derek Woodward
Starring John Hurt
Cinematography John Alcott
Edited by Ray Lovejoy
Distributed by Apple Films
Release dates
  • 1974 (1974)
Running time 109 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

Little Malcolm is a 1974 British comedy drama film directed by Stuart Cooper. It was entered into the 24th Berlin International Film Festival where it won the Silver Bear.[1]

The film is based on the stage play Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs by David Halliwell.[2] The full name of the play is used as the film title on the BFI Flipside DVD release, which took place on 24 October 2011.[3]

An Apple Films project, Little Malcolm was the first feature film produced by former Beatle George Harrison.[2] The film was shot primarily in Lancashire, in the north of England, during February and March of 1973.[4] Harrison supplied incidental music for the soundtrack[3] and, after being introduced to the duo Splinter by their manager Mal Evans, produced their song "Lonely Man" for inclusion in a pivotal scene.[5][6]

Like many of Apple's film and recording projects, production on Little Malcolm was then jeopardised by lawsuits pertaining to Harrison, John Lennon and Ringo Starr's severing of ties with manager Allen Klein.[7][8] Speaking in 2011, Cooper recalled that Harrison "fought for a very long time to extract Little Malcolm from the official receivers"; its entry in the Berlin festival was only possible because the festival was an artistic forum and not finance-related.[3] After what Cooper described as an "incredible" reception at Berlin for "this very British film",[3] Little Malcolm went on to win a gold medal at the Atlanta Film Festival in August 1974.[6] Once the Beatles' partnership had been formally dissolved in January 1975, the film received a brief run in London's West End.[9]

Cast[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Berlinale Archiv Jahresarchive 1974 Preisträger". Retrieved 19 November 2010. 
  2. ^ a b Clayson, p. 370.
  3. ^ a b c d Michael Simmons, "Cry for a Shadow", Mojo, November 2011, p. 85.
  4. ^ Badman, p. 90.
  5. ^ Clayson, p. 346.
  6. ^ a b Badman, p. 129.
  7. ^ Doggett, pp. 204–06.
  8. ^ Woffinden, pp. 74–75.
  9. ^ Badman, pp. 149, 150.

Sources[edit]

  • Keith Badman, The Beatles Diary Volume 2: After the Break-Up 1970–2001, Omnibus Press (London, 2001; ISBN 0-7119-8307-0).
  • Alan Clayson, George Harrison, Sanctuary (London, 2003; ISBN 1-86074-489-3).
  • Peter Doggett, You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, It Books (New York, NY, 2011; ISBN 978-0-06-177418-8).
  • Bob Woffinden, The Beatles Apart, Proteus (London, 1981; ISBN 0-906071-89-5).

External links[edit]