Little Man (Sonny & Cher song)

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Little Man is a hit single by the pop duo Sonny and Cher released in 1966 from their third studio album In Case You're In Love.[1] It became one of their biggest hits, reaching number #1 on the singles charts in various European countries.

Reception[edit]

This single became the duo's greatest chart success bar I Got You Babe in the UK, and became 1 of only 3 top ten hits for the duo there. Sonny & Cher duo recordings in the first half of 1966 started performing less well on the charts ("Have I stayed too long" peaked at #49 in April 1966). In September the duo embarked on an ambitious tour of Europe, but not really with a song to promote. While in London they recorded the vocals for the backing track they had brought along and it gave them their biggest hit in Europe: "Little man". Its continental flavour with Greek and gypsy overtones struck an immediate chord combined with numerous television appearances all over Europe. In The Netherlands, Sweden and Belgium it shot to the number 1 position in record time and stayed there for weeks on end. It was also decided then to release Cher's version of "Sunny" (from her 3rd solo album) in Europe, in competition with Bobby Hebb's original and Georgie Fame's jazzy cover. With amazing success: "Sunny" rose to number 2 in the Netherlands (giving them the number 1 and 2 slot simultaneously at one point) and 4 in Sweden. In Italy and France legendary singer Dalida did much better with her Italian and French versions ("Petit homme") than Sonny & Cher's originals. Milva and I Rogers also had a go in Italy. The big success in France was the inspiration for an inspired cover by singer Erick Saint-Laurent entitled "Les enfants qui jouent" (French lyrics by Monty). Sonny commented at the time he was flattered by the covers but also frustrated the original versions did not do too well. Sonny & Cher then recorded their own French and Italian ("Piccolo ragazzo") versions but with little effect. Their strong American accents (especially on the Bono part) did not help matters. While "Little man" was the high point of Sonny & Cher's singles in Europe it missed out on the top twenty in their native America (reaching #21). Perhaps the beat was too continental.

Chart performance[edit]