Livingston County Courthouse (New York)

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Livingston County Courthouse
Livingston County Courthouse.jpg
Livingston County Courthouse (2007)
General information
Location Geneseo, New York, USA
Address 2 Court Street
Coordinates 42°48′3″N 077°48′57″W / 42.80083°N 77.81583°W / 42.80083; -77.81583Coordinates: 42°48′3″N 077°48′57″W / 42.80083°N 77.81583°W / 42.80083; -77.81583
Design and construction
Architecture firm Bragdon & Hillman[1]

Livingston County Courthouse in Livingston County, New York is a building in Geneseo, New York, USA, located on 2 Court Street.[2] The court house was designed in 1898 by the Rochester architectural firm of Bragdon & Hillman, which included architects Claude Fayette Bragdon and J. Con. Hillman. Their work on the court house was featured in exhibitions published by architectural organizations.

In 2000 the Livingston County Board of Supervisors approved US$77,000 in renovations for the courthouse, which included exterior painting work and security improvement. Judge Ronald Cicoria, who retired in 2005 as the longest sitting judge in New York State, was originally inspired to study the practice of law while walking past the courthouse on his way to class at the State University of New York at Geneseo.

In 2001 a fund campaign began to build a statue of James S. Wadsworth on the grounds of the courthouse, modeled after the bronze statue of Wadsworth at Gettysburg National Military Park in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. In February 2002, the Livingston County Board of Supervisors agreed to allow the statue to be built on the front lawn of the courthouse. The fund raising campaign had its inaugural event on April 5, 2002, with a speech at the State University of New York at Geneseo by Pulitzer Prize winner and Civil War historian James M. McPherson.

Building history[edit]

Work on the Courthouse was completed in 1901 to designs by the Rochester architectural firm of Bragdon & Hillman,[1] which included architects Claude Fayette Bragdon and J. Con. Hillman.[3][4] The architects designed the building in 1898.[4] Writing in Rochester History published by the Rochester Public Library, Erville Costa comments: "The Livingston County Courthouse, which they built in 1898, reflects Bragdon's conviction at the time that colonial architecture was a more honest expression of a truly national spirit than either the eclectic or Richardsonian architecture which dominated the scene."[5]

The "Decorative Scheme for the Court Room" and floor plans of the new courthouse were featured in the Catalogue of the Thirteenth Annual Exhibition of the Architectural League of New York, by the Architectural League of New York, published in 1898.[4] The entrance to the courthouse was featured in the Catalogue of the Fourteenth Annual Exhibition of the Architectural League of New York, published in 1899,[6] and in the 1899 Catalogue of the Annual Exhibition of the Saint Louis Architectural Club.[7]

In 2000, the Livingston County Board of Supervisors approved $77,000 in renovations for the courthouse.[8] This included $64,800 for exterior painting work on the building, and $13,100 for a metal detector unit to be installed at the front entrance of the building.[8]

Wadsworth statue campaign[edit]

In 2001, a campaign began to raise $100,000 to build a statue of James S. Wadsworth on the courthouse grounds.[9][10][11] Wadsworth was a general in the American Civil War and a native of Geneseo.[12] The statue was intended to be a 9-foot replica of the bronze statue of Wadsworth built in 1914 on the battlefield at Gettysburg National Military Park in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.[11][12] In February 2002 the Livingston County Board of Supervisors agreed to allow the statue to be built in front of the courthouse, at the northern end of Main Street.[11] "It seems like it's in line with the historic nature of the courthouse and the history of the region," said County Administrator Nick Mazza in a statement in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle.[11] The fund raising campaign was launched with an inaugural event April 5, 2002 with a speech on civil war history given at the Wadsworth Auditorium at the State University of New York at Geneseo by Pulitzer Prize winner and civil war historian James M. McPherson.[10] The statue campaign was headed by Judith Hunter, a research scholar at the State University of New York at Geneseo.[9]

Livingston County Court[edit]

Judge Gerard Alonzo served as a Livingston County Court judge from 1996 to 2005,[13] and Judge J. Robert Houston served from 1973 to 1993.[14] Judge Ronald Cicoria served at Livingston County Court in 1999.[15] Cicoria was first inspired to study law while passing by the courthouse on his way to class at the State University of New York at Geneseo.[16] After thirty years of service, Cicoria retired in 2005 – at the time he was the longest sitting judge in New York State,[16] as well as the longest sitting judge in the history of Livingston County.[17]

In 2002 the Livingston County District Attorney was Thomas Moran.[18] Thomas VanStrydonck served as a State Supreme Court Justice and gave decisions at the courthouse in 2006.[19] In 2009 Diane C. Murphy was the Chief Clerk of the court.[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b William A., Coffin (1901). Pan-American Exposition, Catalogue of the Exhibition of Fine Arts. Buffalo, New York: David Gray. p. 47. 
  2. ^ Yan, Penn (February 18, 2004). "Around the Towns: Students will take part in mock trial tourney". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 1F. 
  3. ^ Bragdon, Claude Fayette (2006). More Lives Than One. Cosimo, Inc. p. 64. ISBN 1-59605-359-3. 
  4. ^ a b c Architectural League of New York (1898). Catalogue of the Thirteenth Annual Exhibition of the Architectural League of New York. New York: The Knickerbocker Press. pp. 118, 120. 
  5. ^ Costa, Erville (October 1967). "Claude F. Bragdon, Architect, Stage Designer, and Mystic". Rochester History 29 (4) (Rochester, New York: Rochester Public Library). p. 8. 
  6. ^ Architectural League of New York (1899). Catalogue of the Thirteenth Annual Exhibition of the Architectural League of New York. Press of the Nicoll & Roy Co. p. 38. 
  7. ^ Saint Louis Architectural Club (1899). Catalogue of the Annual Exhibition of the Saint Louis Architectural Club. Saint Louis Museum of Fine Arts. p. 8. 
  8. ^ a b Staff (July 16, 2000). "Neighborhood Notebook: Courthouse work ready to begin". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 3B. 
  9. ^ a b Spector, Joseph (July 12, 2001). "Geneseo trying to honor respected Civil War hero". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 3B. 
  10. ^ a b Staff (April 3, 2002). "Around the Towns: Civil War talk to raise funds for hero statue". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 1F. 
  11. ^ a b c d Spector, Joseph (February 21, 2002). "Wadsworth statue to be at Livingston courthouse". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 3B. 
  12. ^ a b Staff (September 12, 2003). "News beat: Geneseo auction benefits statue". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 2B. 
  13. ^ Low, Stuart (December 21, 2005). "Retiring judge ready to carve out new career". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 1F, 2F. 
  14. ^ Staff (May 7, 2000). "Neighborhood Notebook: Fifth-graders plan civil mock trial". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 3B. 
  15. ^ Jones, Jack (February 11, 1999). "Shannon to stay with mom". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 1A, 5A. 
  16. ^ a b Staff (October 25, 2005). "Global Broadcast Database - English: 'Longest sitting judge'". innewsnetwork (SHOW: News 11:00 PM IND). 
  17. ^ Staff (October 26, 2005). "Global Broadcast Database - English: 'He is also the longest sitting judge in Livingston County history'". innewsnetwork (SHOW: News 7:00 AM IND). 
  18. ^ Spector, Joseph (January 30, 2002). "Auto dealer's customers sound off". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 4B. 
  19. ^ Freile, Victoria E. (July 22, 2006). "Man gets 18 years for strangling wife". Rochester Democrat and Chronicle. p. 4B. 
  20. ^ Kitchell, Catherine A.; Bureau of National Affairs (2007). BNA's Directory of State and Federal Courts, Judges, and Clerks 2008: A State-by-state and Federal Listing. BNA Books. p. 333. ISBN 1-57018-670-7. 

Further reading[edit]

  • American Council of Learned Societies (1959). Dictionary of American Biography 13. Scribner. p. 105. 
  • Proctor, L. B. Livingston county courthouse, its surroundings and historic memories, O. (Alb. 1897) — Cited in: New York State Library (Transmitted to the Legislature January 22, 1906). New York State Library 88th Annual Report: Including Home Education and the Library School. New York State Education Department. p. 152. 
  • United States Congress. Senate. Committee on the Judiciary. (2004). Confirmation Hearing on Federal Appointments: Hearing Before the Committee on the Judiciary, United States Senate, One Hundred Eighth Congress, First Session. United States Government Printing Office. p. 450. ISBN 0-16-070899-0. 

External links[edit]