Lizzie Compton

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Lizzie "Jack" Compton (born c.1847) was a woman who disguised herself as a man in order to fight for the Union in the American Civil War.[1] She enlisted at the age of 14, and served in seven different regiments until the conclusion of the war.

Early life[edit]

Little is definitively known of Lizzie Compton's early life. She was discovered as being a woman seven times during the war, and each time gave different details of her life.

Combat Experience[edit]

Compton saw considerable action during the war and was wounded on two occasions. She was wounded first at Antietam by shrapnel as part of an uphill charge at an entrenched confederate position that resulted in 9,600 Union casualties. After this injury she was mustered out of active duty, but headed west in order to rejoin the army as part of the 25th Michigan Infantry. She was subsequently shot in the shoulder in a squabble outside of Green River, Kentucky, known also as the Battle of Tebbs Bend. After recovering she returned to Green River to rejoin a regiment that was encamped there.[2]

Later life[edit]

Lizzie Compton's postwar life remains as vague as her early life. After attempting to join a number of regiments, many of which discovered her and set her to duties at the field hospitals, she was last sighted in 1864 caring for wounded Union soldiers.[3]

Physical Appearance[edit]

Lizzie Compton stood approximately 5 feet tall and was slight of build. She appeared older than she was, joining the Army at just 14 with contemporaries placing her at the age of approximately 17.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Women in the Civil War: Extraordinary Stories of Soldiers, Spies, Nurses ... - Larry G. Eggleston - Google Boeken". Books.google.com. Retrieved 2014-04-30. 
  2. ^ Blanton, DeAnne; Cook, Lauren, They Fought Like Demons: Women In The American Civil War. Baton Rouge, 2002. ISBN 0-8071-2806-6 pgs. 14-17.
  3. ^ Blanton, DeAnne; Cook, Lauren, They Fought Like Demons: Women In The American Civil War. Baton Rouge, 2002. ISBN 0-8071-2806-6 pgs. pgs. 115-116.
  4. ^ Blanton, DeAnne; Cook, Lauren, They Fought Like Demons: Women In The American Civil War. Baton Rouge, 2002. ISBN 0-8071-2806-6 pgs. 50-51.

Further Reading[edit]

  • Eggleston, Larry G. Women in the Civil War: Extraordinary Stories of Soldiers, Spies, Nurses, Doctors, Crusaders, and Others. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 2003. ISBN 0-786-41493-6 OCLC 51580671
  • Funkhouser, Darlene. Women of the Civil War: [Soldiers, Spies, and Nurses]. Wever, IA: Quixote Press, 2004. ISBN 1-571-66258-8 OCLC 61452250
  • Hall, Richard. Women on the Civil War Battlefront. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2006. ISBN 0-700-61437-0 OCLC 62896383
  • Middleton, Lee. Hearts of Fire--: Soldier Women of the Civil War : with an Addendum on Female Reenactors. Franklin, NC: Genealogy Pub. Service, 1993. ISBN 1-882-75500-6 OCLC 28767147