Llanfairpwll railway station

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Llanfairpwll National Rail
Llanfairpwll
A passenger train pulling through the station, as viewed from the footbridge between the two platforms
Location
Place Llanfairpwll
Local authority Anglesey
Grid reference SH525715
Operations
Station code LPG
Managed by Arriva Trains Wales
Owned by Network Rail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05   6,312
2005/06 Increase 6,803
2006/07 Increase 9,137
2007/08 Increase 12,062
2008/09 Decrease 11,700
2009/10 Increase 13,524
2010/11 Increase 15,498
2011/12 Increase 17,826
2012/13 Increase 17,926
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Llanfairpwll from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Llanfairpwll railway station is a station on the North Wales Coast Line from London Euston to Holyhead on Anglesey, serving the village of Llanfairpwllgwyngyll, Wales.

Opened in 1848, it suffered a catastrophic fire on 13 November 1865 and had to be totally re-constructed. It was closed in 1966 but re-opened in 1970 due to the fire on the Britannia Bridge as the terminus for trains from Holyhead, with a single wooden platform. It was again closed in January 1973 for four months and re-opened with two non-wooden platforms. The station master's house was sold in 1994 to a private company and is now a warehouse shop. The footbridge between the two platforms (the only one on the island) and the signal box remain from the original configuration. However, a turntable, sidings and goods yard have disappeared, the latter two under a car park.[1]

The station is known for its longer name, Llanfairpwllgwyngyll-gogerychwyrndrobwll-llantysilio-gogogoch, but this is a Victorian contrivance for the benefit of tourists.[2] with no basis in historical usage. It comprises the full name of the village, plus local topographical details, plus the name of a neighbouring church etc. The hyphens are usually omitted.

Services[edit]

Although famous for having the longest station name in the UK, trains usually stop (every two hours) only on request. These are Arriva Trains Wales services between Holyhead and Chester via Bangor, Llandudno Junction, Colwyn Bay, Rhyl, Prestatyn and Flint and through trains to Cardiff, Wrexham, Crewe and Birmingham International. There is a limited service (seven trains each way) on Sundays.

The station has very short platforms, only 40 yards (37 m) long.[3]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jones, Geraint: Anglesey Railways, pages 27-28. Carreg Gwalch, 2005
  2. ^ See Slater's Directory.
  3. ^ Permissible line speeds - London North Western Region (North) Network Rail. Page 104

External links[edit]


Preceding station   National Rail National Rail   Following station
Arriva Trains Wales

Coordinates: 53°13′16″N 4°12′32″W / 53.221°N 4.209°W / 53.221; -4.209