Llywel

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Llywel is a small village that gives its name to Llywel community in Powys, Wales. The main settlement in the community is Trecastle. According to the 2001 Census the population of Llywel community is 524.

Location[edit]

Llywel village is located on the A40 road, about 8 miles West of Sennybridge. The River Gwydderig runs through the village, not far from its source.

Etymology[edit]

Llywel, occasionally referred to in texts as Llowel, is believed to be the name of a minor Welsh Saint. He is said to have been a disciple of Saint Teilo and Saint Dyfrig.

Church of St David[edit]

Church[edit]

The Church of Saint David (Welsh: "Eglwys Dewi Sant") is found in Llywel. It is said to have originally been dedicated to three saints: David, Darn (Paternus), and Teilo; and known as Llantrisant.[1] Its name was changed when it was granted to the Chapter of Saint David sometime between 1203[2] and 1229[3]

The church displays Perpendicular Gothic architecture. In the churchyard is buried the 19th Century Welsh writer and preacher David Owen.

Llywel Stone[edit]

An Ogham stone known as the "Llywel Stone" (because it was brought to the attention of the museum by the local vicar) that was found at Pentre Poeth Farm was acquired by the British Museum in 1878 and is now on display there. The inscription on the stone is 'MACCVTRENI + SALICIDVNI'. [4]

A National Park booklet provides a drawing of the Llywel Stone and states that copies reside with Llywel Church and the Brecknockshire museum in Brecon.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.cpat.demon.co.uk/projects/longer/churches/brecon/16903.htm Brecknockshire Churches Survey – Church of St David, Llywel
  2. ^ http://www.cpat.demon.co.uk/projects/longer/churches/brecon/16903.htm Brecknockshire Churches Survey – Church of St David, Llywel
  3. ^ http://www.terra-demetarum.org.uk/St_David/St_David.htm#FOOTNOTE James, Heather (accessed July 2008) The Cult of St. David—a study of dedication patterns in the medieval diocese of St Davids
  4. ^ "standing stone / gate-post". British Museum - Collection online. 
  5. ^ http://www.breconbeacons.org/visit-us/about-the-brecon-beacons/field-monuments/view

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°57′N 3°38′W / 51.950°N 3.633°W / 51.950; -3.633