Loch Ness Monster (roller coaster)

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Loch Ness Monster
BGE-Loch Ness Monster.jpg
The interlocking vertical loops
Busch Gardens Williamsburg
Park section Scotland
Coordinates 37°14′03″N 76°38′46″W / 37.234277°N 76.646°W / 37.234277; -76.646Coordinates: 37°14′03″N 76°38′46″W / 37.234277°N 76.646°W / 37.234277; -76.646
Status Operating
Opening date May 20, 1978
General statistics
Type Steel
Manufacturer Arrow Dynamics
Designer Ron Toomer
Model Custom Looping Coaster
Track layout Terrain
Lift/launch system Two chain lift hills
Height 130 ft (40 m)
Drop 114 ft (35 m)
Length 3,240 ft (990 m)
Speed 60 mph (97 km/h)
Inversions 2
Duration 2:10
Max vertical angle 55°
Capacity 2200 riders per hour
G-force 3.5
Height restriction 48 in (122 cm)
Loch Ness Monster at RCDB
Pictures of Loch Ness Monster at RCDB

The Loch Ness Monster is a steel roller coaster located in Busch Gardens Williamsburg. Designed by Ron Toomer of Arrow Dynamics, the Loch Ness Monster was the world's tallest roller coaster when it opened in 1978.[1] It was also the first coaster to contain interlocking loops.[2] In 2013, the ride celebrated its 35th anniversary.

The ride, located in the Scottish-themed area of the park, also features a helix tunnel, two lift hills and a 114-foot (35 m) drop. It is classified as an American Coaster Enthusiasts Coaster Landmark


Layout[edit]

Interlocking loops of the Loch Ness Monster with Griffon on the left.

As the train starts to move, a voice recording says, "Thank you, and enjoy your ride on the legendary Loch Ness Monster!" After departing from the station, the train reaches the 130-foot (40 m) lift hill with a small and tight turn (with views of Apollo's Chariot's lift hill and first drop) bringing it to a 114-foot (35 m) drop towards the park's Rhine River below. A large upward hill crosses over the park's 'Land of the Dragons' and trim brakes bring riders to the first of the two interlocking loops. After the loop, the train makes a turn to a block brake, which then leads into a covered tunnel/helix.

Inside the tunnel, the train makes 2.75 circular turns before coming to the end of the tunnel. The tunnel has had various lights and special effects over the years, including a light-up picture of the cartoon Loch Ness Monster, and now has one strobe that goes off at about the beginning of the second revolution. The on-ride photo was once taken inside the tunnel, but has since been changed to a position after the second loop. As the train exits the tunnel at the end of the helix, a small brake run slows the train to ascend a smaller second lift hill.

The train makes a wide turn after the lift and drops downward into the second loop. It then goes uphill again before being brought to a stop by the final brake.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Shock Wave
World's Tallest Complete Circuit Roller Coaster
June 1978–1983
Succeeded by
Dragon Mountain