Logan, Ohio

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Not to be confused with Logan County, Ohio. ‹See Tfd›
Logan, Ohio
City
West Main Street in downtown Logan in 2006
West Main Street in downtown Logan in 2006
Location of Logan, Ohio
Location of Logan, Ohio
Detailed map of Logan
Detailed map of Logan
Coordinates: 39°32′21″N 82°24′22″W / 39.53917°N 82.40611°W / 39.53917; -82.40611Coordinates: 39°32′21″N 82°24′22″W / 39.53917°N 82.40611°W / 39.53917; -82.40611
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hocking
Government
 • Mayor Martin Irvine
Area[1]
 • Total 4.93 sq mi (12.77 km2)
 • Land 4.79 sq mi (12.41 km2)
 • Water 0.14 sq mi (0.36 km2)
Elevation[2] 741 ft (226 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 7,152
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 7,157
 • Density 1,493.1/sq mi (576.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 43138
Area code(s) 740
FIPS code 39-44632[5]
GNIS feature ID 1042716[2]
Website http://www.loganohio.net/
The Hocking County Courthouse in Logan

Logan is a city in Hocking County, Ohio, United States. The population was 7,152 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Hocking County.[6] Logan is located in southeast Ohio, on the Hocking River southeast of Columbus. The current mayor of Logan is Republican Martin Irvine, who began a four-year term in January 2012.

History[edit]

Logan is the county seat of Hocking County, Ohio. Residents named the town in honor of Chief Logan of the Mingo Indian tribe. He and his band lived in this area at the time of European-American settlement. Ohio Governor Thomas Worthington established the community in 1816.[7]

According to the Ohio Historical Society, Logan had about 250 residents in 1825, and 600 by 1840. The Hocking River provided sufficient water power for the purpose of operating grist and sawmills, particularly at the falls above Logan. The town of Logan was slow to progress until the opening of the Hocking Canal, a branch of the Ohio and Erie Canal, in 1838. Several industries prospered due to the rich mineral resources of the Hocking Valley.

Logan was incorporated as a city in 1839.[8]

The discovery of immense quantities of coal led to the flourishing mining industry. Towns appeared and vanished as quickly as mines opened and closed.

It was soon found that iron ore could be extracted from the sandstone bedrock of the area. At its height during the Civil War, Ohio was the leading producer of iron for implements and weapons.[citation needed] No less than forty-six furnaces were firing in southern Ohio's six-county Hanging Rock Iron Region. By summer 1865, up to sixty furnaces were counted.[9]

The clay soils of the Hocking Valley helped Ohio become a leader in clay products. The firebrick industry of the valley manufactured such products as clay tile, building and paving bricks and clay sewer pipe. Evidence of the industry can be seen in the many brick houses and abandoned kilns of the area. Clay is still an important industry in the region.

In the town's early history, many manufacturers were established in the community. In the early years, the two largest employers were the Motherwell Iron and Steel Company and the railroad. In more recent history, prominent industrial names in Logan have included Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Selkirk Metalbestos, General Electric, Logan Clay Products, Smead, Amanda Bent Bolt, Osburn Associates, Keynes Brothers, and Carborundum.

Today, many residents of Logan and the surrounding area work in the tourism sector. Numerous residents operate bed and breakfasts or work in hotels or restaurants to meet the needs of tourists visiting the Hocking Hills State Park. Many natural wonders exist in the area immediately surrounding Logan.

Geography[edit]

Logan is located at 39°32′21″N 82°24′22″W / 39.53917°N 82.40611°W / 39.53917; -82.40611 (39.539159, -82.406108).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.93 square miles (12.77 km2), of which, 4.79 square miles (12.41 km2) is land and 0.14 square miles (0.36 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 826
1860 1,489 80.3%
1870 1,827 22.7%
1880 2,666 45.9%
1890 3,119 17.0%
1900 3,480 11.6%
1910 4,850 39.4%
1920 5,493 13.3%
1930 6,080 10.7%
1940 6,177 1.6%
1950 5,972 −3.3%
1960 6,417 7.5%
1970 6,269 −2.3%
1980 6,557 4.6%
1990 6,725 2.6%
2000 6,704 −0.3%
2010 7,152 6.7%
Est. 2012 7,157 0.1%
Sources:[11][12][13][14][15][16][5][17]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 7,152 people, 2,982 households, and 1,831 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,493.1 inhabitants per square mile (576.5 /km2). There were 3,374 housing units at an average density of 704.4 per square mile (272.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.5% White, 0.8% African American, 0.3% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 0.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.8% of the population.

There were 2,982 households of which 31.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.4% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.6% were non-families. 33.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.95.

The median age in the city was 38 years. 24.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.6% were from 25 to 44; 24.5% were from 45 to 64; and 17.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.4% male and 53.6% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 6,704 people, 2,790 households, and 1,768 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,175.2 people per square mile (840.4/km²). There were 2,948 housing units at an average density of 956.5 per square mile (369.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.87% White, 0.57% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.06% Asian, 0.01% from other races, and 1.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population.

There were 2,790 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.2% were married couples living together, 13.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.6% were non-families. 32.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 19.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 84.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,691, and the median income for a family was $38,143. Males had a median income of $31,875 versus $23,738 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,836. About 13.0% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.9% of those under age 18 and 16.8% of those age 65 or over.

Events[edit]

Every year, on Father’s Day weekend, the downtown streets of Logan, Ohio come alive with the celebration of the washboard, as a musical instrument. Logan is the home of the Columbus Washboard Company, the only remaining washboard manufacturing company in the U.S. Washboards continue to be used as instruments of laundry today in some parts of the world and serve decoratively in many homes. The Washboard Music Festival celebrates the washboard's role as the source of "toe-tappin’" rhythm found in jug bands and Dixieland groups throughout the country.

On the first Saturday of October, Logan High School hosts its annual marching band festival, the Logan Fall Festival of Bands. Bands who accept the invitation to perform at the festival entertain spectators with their halftime routines, some specially choreographed for the festival itself.

During the last week of July, the Insea Sound Shop of Nelsonville, Ohio, holds the annual Diamond Music Festival at the Isaac Walton Clubhouse, situated on the banks of Lake Logan.

Notable residents[edit]

  • Michael David Brown - assistant professor of creative writing at Ohio University, author of both the novel Under Heat (1989) and the screenplay for the movie of the same title, released in 1994.
  • John Corby - Columbus, Ohio radio personality
  • Estel Crabtree - Major League Baseball player for the Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals.
  • Don Robertson - prize-winning novelist, wrote a steamy, cynical, historical novel, Paradise Falls, based on Logan, Ohio.
  • Curtis Scaparrotti - Director of Operations for United States Central Command and past Commandant of the United States Military Academy
  • Katie Smith - Women's National Basketball Association player & Olympic Gold Medalist
  • Bob McBride (1922-2011) - Member of the University of Notre Dame 1946 national championship football team and decorated World War II veteran, receiving three battle stars, a purple heart and the presidential unit citation following the Battle of the Bulge. He was later the offensive line coach for Notre Dame's 1949 national championship team.[18]
  • Margee Blair (Mary Martinez) - 1972 Logan High School Graduate / 1976 Ohio University Graduate in Modern Language. Presently Associate Professor - English Department at Universidad de Oriente, Barcelona, Venezuela, since 1979 to the present date.[19]

Records[edit]

Logan, Ohio holds the record of being the hometown of the oldest radio show in Ohio. Saint Matthew Lutheran Church, located on Hunter Street, has been broadcasting its worship service every Sunday on the radio since 1961, making it the oldest continuously running radio show in the state of Ohio. The First Presbyterian Church is the oldest continuously running church in Hocking County, and it was founded nearly 180 years ago.

The Columbus Washboard Company is located in Logan. It is the only remaining washboard manufacturing company in the United States. The world's largest washboard, which was made inside the factory and installed before the first Washboard Music Festival in 2000, is attached to the side of the building.

Logan is the first city in the state of Ohio to install a double roundabout. The roundabout will be located at the interchange of State Route 664 and US Route 33. The project is scheduled to be completed in October 2013.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  7. ^ Ohio Historical Society Ohio History Central, 2005-07-01. Retrieved on 2008-05-23.
  8. ^ History of Hocking Valley, Ohio. Inter-State Publishing Co. 1883. p. 896. 
  9. ^ Sharon M. Kouns "SOME DATA REGARDING THE FURNACES OF THE HANGING ROCK IRON REGION", The Lawrence Register, 1998-05-17. Retrieved on 2008-05-23.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  12. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  17. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  18. ^ "Bob McBride", University of Notre Dame
  19. ^ [1]

External links[edit]