Logan Scott-Bowden

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Logan Scott-Bowden
Born 21 February 1920
Whitehaven, Cumbria, United Kingdom
Died 9 February 2014
Allegiance  United Kingdom
Service/branch  British Army
Years of service 1939 - 1974
Rank Major General
Unit Royal Engineers
Commands held Ulster Defence Regiment
Battles/wars World War II
Awards Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Distinguished Service Order
Military Cross and Bar

Major General Logan Scott-Bowden, CBE, DSO, MC and Bar (21 February 1920 - 9 February 2014)[1] was a British army officer. A Royal Engineers officer during World War II, he was the first commander of the Ulster Defence Regiment. Retiring as a Major General in 1974, he served as the Colonel-Commandant of the Royal Engineers from 1975 to 1980.

Early life[edit]

Scott-Bowden was born in Whitehaven, Cumbria on 21 February 1920, the son of Lt.Col. Jonathan Scott-Bowden, OBE, TD, and Mary Scott-Bowden (née Logan). He was educated at Malvern College and the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich. He was commissioned into the Royal Engineers on 3 July 1939.[2]

Military career[edit]

Scott-Bowden saw early service in Norway in 1940, before joining the 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division as an Adjutant in 1941. During 1942 and 1943 he served as an on liaison duty with Canadian and American forces.[2] In late 1943 Scott-Bowden joined the reconnaissance unit tasked with scouting the beaches for the D Day landings. At midnight 31 December 1943, with another Royal Engineer, Sergeant Bruce Ogden-Smith, as members of the Combined Operations Pilotage Parties (COPP), during Operation Bell Push Able, he landed on Gold Beach to take samples of the material from the beach. They found that the sand, in places, was thin and supported by weak peat material. They took samples back to the United Kingdom that allowed planners to cope with the weaker than expected beaches.[3] On D Day both Sgt. Ogden-Smith and Maj. Scott-Bowden assisted in piloting the initial American landings on Omaha Beach. He then went onto command 17 Field Squadron for the remainder of the War.[2]

After World War II, he had operational service in Burma, Palestine, Korea, Aden and lastly in Northern Ireland. In Northern Ireland he was given the challenging task of forming the Ulster Defence Regiment.[2] His final appointment in the Armed Services, on promotion to Major General, was as Head of the British Defence Liaison Staff, India.[4] After retirement from active service Scott-Bowden served as the Colonel-Commandant of the Royal Engineers from 1975 to 1980.[5][6]

Personal life[edit]

In 1950 he married Helen Jocelyn, daughter of late Major Sir Francis Caradoc Rose Price, 5th Bt, and late Marjorie Lady Price. They had three sons and three daughters.[2]

Honours[edit]

Appointments[edit]

He held a number of appointments throughout his career including:[2]

  • 3 July 1939, commissioned, Corps of Royal Engineers
  • 1940, served in Norway
  • 4 May 1941 – 3 June 1942, Adjutant, 53rd (Welsh) Infantry Division, RE
  • 1942 – 1943, Liaison Duties in Canada and USA
  • 25 January 1943 – 24 May 1943, Adjutant
  • 1943 – 1944, Normandy Beach Reconnaissance Team
  • 1944 – 1945, Officer Commanding, 17th Field Company RE (NW Europe)
  • 29 May 1946 – 2 December 1946, GSO2, HQ Allied Land Forces South East Asia (Singapore)
  • 03.12.1946 – 18 October 1947, Brigade Major, 98th Indian Infantry Brigade (Burma)
  • 16 October 1950 – 3 December 1950, SORE2, HQ British Troops in Egypt (Palestine)
  • 1951, served in Libya
  • 1 March 1951 – 11 February 1953, DAQMG, War Office
  • 1953, served in Korea
  • 24 July 1954 – 2 April 1956, Brigade Major, HQ Training Brigade
  • 1 April 1958 – 18 February 1959, GSO2 Joint Secretariat HQ British Forces Arabian Peninsular
  • 20 February 1959 – 24 April 1960, GSO1 (Plans) (Arabia)
  • 1960 – 1962, Commander Royal Engineers (CRE), 1st Division (British Army of the Rhine)
  • 20 December 1962 – 29 March 1964, GSO1 (Home Defence Plans), UK Land Forces HQ, Eastern Command
  • 31 March 1964 – 6 May 1966, Assistant Director of Plans, War Office
  • 20 May 1966 – January 1967, Commander, HQ Training Brigade
  • 1969, National Defence College, India
  • 1970 – 1971, Commander, Ulster Defence Regiment
  • 1971 – 1974, Head of British Defence Liaison Staff, India
  • 1975 – 1980, Colonel-Commandant, Corps of Royal Engineers

Ranks[edit]

2nd Lieutenant 3 July 1939
Lieutenant 3 January 1941
Acting Captain 15 November 1940 – 14 February 1941
Temporary Captain 15 February 1941 – 24 August 1943
War Substantive Captain 25 August 1943
Captain 1 July 1946
Acting Major 25 May 1943 – 24 August 1943
Temporary Major 25 August 1943 – 2 July 1952
Major 3 July 1952
Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 2 February 1959 – 19 August 1960
Lieutenant colonel 20 August 1960 (supernumerary 20 August 1963)
Temporary Colonel 31 March 1964 – 10 July 1964
Colonel 11 July 1964
Temporary Brigadier 20May 1966 – 30 December 1966
Brigadier 31 December 1966[11]
Major-General 17 August 1971[4]
Retired 5 September 1974[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ SCOTT-BOWDEN.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h J.N. Houterman. "British Army Officers 1939-1945 - S". Unithistories.com. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  3. ^ Coast (TV Series), BBC productions 2009 Series 4 No 2, Cap Gris Nez to Mont Saint-Michel
  4. ^ a b The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 45586. p. 1271. 31 January 1972.
  5. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 46741. p. 14565. 18 November 1975.
  6. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 48394. p. 17053. 8 December 1980.
  7. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 45554. p. 5. 31 December 1971.
  8. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 43343. p. 4943. 5 June 1964.
  9. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 36563. p. 2854. 15 June 1944.
  10. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 37442. p. 635. 22 January 1946.
  11. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 44238. p. 1154. 27 January 1967.
  12. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 46419. p. 12156. 2 December 1974.
Military offices
Preceded by
None
Commanding officer, Ulster Defence Regiment
1970–1971
Succeeded by
Denis Ormerod