Logo sign

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A blue sign consisting of the words "Food-Exit 44" and the logos of the following fast food restaurants: Blimpie, IHOP, KFC, McDonald's, and Subway
An example of a typical American logo sign

Logo signs (also known as specific service signs or Logo service signs) are blue road signs used on freeways that display the logos of businesses prior to an interchange. Typically, a business pays fees to a transportation department to have their logos displayed on a large panel alongside other business.

In the United States[edit]

In the United States, logo signs were permitted on rural Interstates in 1965 as part of the Highway Beautification Act. Originally, such signs were limited to the following categories: gas, food, lodging, and camping. The 1976 amendments to the Highway Beautification Act expanded the program to federal-aid primary highways. In 2000, the federal restriction of logo signs to rural areas was lifted, although state laws still vary on whether or not logo signs can be installed on urban highways. In 2003, two new categories were added to the standard: attractions and 24-hour pharmacies.[1] Logo signs in the United States are limited to six logos per sign, and additional signs may be used up to a total of four per interchange.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff (2004) [2003]. "Chapter 2F: Specific Service Signs" (PDF). Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (Revision 1, 2003 ed.). Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. pp. 2F–1–2F–6. ISBN 9780935403817. 
  2. ^ Staff (2009). "Chapter 2J: Specific Service Signs" (PDF). Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (2009 ed.). Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. pp. 312–19. ISBN 9781615835171. 

External links[edit]