Logographic printing

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Logographic printing is a form of moveable type printing where the font comprises words or parts of words rather than single letters.

The system, whilst not widely adopted, was used to produce a number of books in the eighteenth century, as well as The Times or The Daily Universal Register as it was originally known.

The edition of 12 March 1788, for example was "printed Logographically" by "R. Nutkins" at the Logographic Press, Printing House Square, Blackfriars.

The press was owned, though, by John Walter, the founder of The Times who had acquired the printing system from its inventor.

Books published by the logographic system include Anderson's History of Commerce in four volumes, 1787-1789.

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References[edit]

  1. Notes and Queries 1850