Lomira, Wisconsin

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This article is about the village. For the adjacent town, see Lomira (town), Wisconsin.
Lomira, Wisconsin
Village
Downtown Lomira
Downtown Lomira
Location in Wisconsin
Location in Wisconsin
Coordinates: 43°34′39″N 88°26′50″W / 43.57750°N 88.44722°W / 43.57750; -88.44722Coordinates: 43°34′39″N 88°26′50″W / 43.57750°N 88.44722°W / 43.57750; -88.44722
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County Dodge
Area[1]
 • Total 2.04 sq mi (5.28 km2)
 • Land 2.02 sq mi (5.23 km2)
 • Water 0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation[2] 1,004 ft (306 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 2,430
 • Estimate (2013[4]) 2,407
 • Density 1,203.0/sq mi (464.5/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 920
FIPS code 55-45500[5]
GNIS feature ID 1583594[2]

Lomira is a village in Dodge County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 2,430 at the 2010 census. The village is located within the Town of Lomira, at the crossroads of State Highways 49, 67 and 175, and U.S. Route 41. It is two hours by car from Green Bay and one hour from Milwaukee.

Geography[edit]

Lomira is located at 43°35′42″N 88°26′40″W / 43.59500°N 88.44444°W / 43.59500; -88.44444 (43.595089, -88.444602).[6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 2.04 square miles (5.28 km2), of which, 2.02 square miles (5.23 km2) of it is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,430 people, 1,002 households, and 639 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,203.0 inhabitants per square mile (464.5/km2). There were 1,096 housing units at an average density of 542.6 per square mile (209.5/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.2% White, 0.7% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 1.7% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.6% of the population.

There were 1,002 households of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.2% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.96.

The median age in the village was 36.7 years. 24.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.5% were from 25 to 44; 25% were from 45 to 64; and 12.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.3% male and 49.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 2,233 people, 846 households, and 583 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,148.8 people per square mile (444.4/km²). There were 899 housing units at an average density of 462.5 per square mile (178.9/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.16% White, 0.36% Black or African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 0.76% from other races, and 0.27% from two or more races. 2.55% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 846 households out of which 39.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.2% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the village the population was spread out with 29.3% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 16.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $46,522, and the median income for a family was $52,600. Males had a median income of $36,440 versus $24,286 for females. The per capita income for the village was $20,256. About 3.1% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.3% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

The early history of the Village of Lomira is closely interwoven with the Town of Lomira.[7] Prior to the arrival of white settlers, the son of Chief Black Hawk supposedly camped in the vicinity while blazing a trail from Milwaukee to Green Bay.[citation needed] There is no record of a settlement at Lomira prior to 1849. It was originally called Springfield, but in 1849, the name was changed to Lomira. Local lore says the village is a namesake of Elmira Schoonover, daughter of Sam Schoonover, an early settler. The first Post Office was established on May 11, 1849.

A petition for incorporation of the Village of Lomira was made to the circuit court of Dodge County on 24 March 1899. The petition described the designated territory of "433 residents" as "containing a large number of stores, saloons, residences, elevators, hotels, blacksmith shops, cheese factory, planing mill and other places of business, and that the same is a railroad station." Copies of the petition were posted in the saloons of F. Kauper and Peter Greiten, and in the store and office of Peter Wolf, "all of which said places are public places." Petitioners presented the incorporation order at a special term of the circuit court held in the city of Waukesha, Wisconsin on 9 May 1899. Records of the public election on June 3, 1899 show 104 ballots were cast, of which 58 were for incorporation and 45 against.

Transportation[edit]

Lomira is at the crossroads of State Highways 49, 67 and 175, and U.S. Route 41. The Wisconsin Central Limited Railroad provides industrials rail service for business and industry. Private air transportation is available in Fond du Lac, 10 miles (16 km) north of the village. Commercial air transportation is offered in Appleton, 50 miles (80 km) to the north; Milwaukee, 60 miles (97 km) to the south; and Oshkosh, 30 miles (48 km) to the north.

Education[edit]

The 65-square-mile (170 km2) School District of Lomira includes the villages of Brownsville Lomira, and Theresa, the hamlet of Knowles, and all or portions of the towns of Ashford, Byron, and Eden in Fond du Lac County; Leroy, Lomira and Theresa in Dodge County; and Wayne in Washington County. The Lomira School District has two elementary schools, one in Lomira and the other in Theresa. The district's middle school and high school are also in Lomira. Lomira has one parochial school: St. John's Lutheran School (WELS). The Consolidated Catholic School Lomira-Theresa (CCLT) closed at the conclusion of the 2009-10 school year. In February 2013 district residents were surveyed about plans for the schools. The majority of respondents indicated a preference for significant upgrades to the district's schools, including a new gymnasium for the high school, relocation of the high school football field, new classrooms in the high school, and an additional cafeteria, kitchen, and district offices.[citation needed]

Business and industry[edit]

Lomira is in an agricultural area, which is reflected in the nature of many of the businesses in the village. In 1985, printing became a significant presence with the opening of the Quad Graphics production plant,[8] the largest single printing facility in the Western Hemisphere.[citation needed] In 2007 Kondex Corporation, a farm machinery and equipment manufacturer, opened a facility in a newly created industrial park.

Religion[edit]

Denomination Church name Street address Founding date
Catholic (Roman Rite) Nativity of St. Mary Parish 699 Milwaukee Street 1870
Lutheran (WELS) St. John's Lutheran Church & School 558 Water Street 1863
United Methodist Trinity United Methodist Church 300 Church Street 1851

The Lomira area has long been a stronghold of the Evangelical Church. While Wisconsin was still a mission of the Illinois Conference, those in the Lomira Circuit expressed a desire for a camp meeting in their area. A first camp meeting was held June 15–21, 1853. People came on foot from Menomonee Falls, about 45 miles (72 km) to the south, and by ox team and wagon from Princeton, about 60 miles (97 km) to the north. There was powerful preaching, ardent praying, and inspiring singing. In 1905 the camp meeting association of the Fond du Lac and Milwaukee Districts were united, with the Lomira site designated as the annual summer meeting place. Camping activities continued in Lomira for 104 years until being transferred to Lake Lucerne in Waushara County in 1957. The former summer camp meeting property then became home to the Trinity United Methodist Church.

Images[edit]

References[edit]

  • Kietzer, Jane. Lomira Through the Years, 1899-1999. Fond du Lac, WI: Action Publications, 1999. This history book, compiled by a long-time resident, was prepared for the 100th anniversary celebration of the Village of Lomira.
  • Lomira: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow, 1976. This history booklet, compiled by long-time resident Virginia Sterr, was prepared for the Lomira celebration honoring our nation's bicentennial.

External links[edit]