London City Council

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the former county council of London in England (1889-1965), see London County Council.

London City Council is the governing body of the city of London, Ontario, Canada.

Composition[edit]

London is divided into 14 wards, with residents in each ward electing one councillor. The mayor is elected city-wide, who along with the councillors form a 15-member council. City council meets in the council chambers at London City Hall.

2010 reform[edit]

Prior to the 2006 civic election, London's city council consisted of 14 councillors (two from each of the seven former wards), four members of Board of Control (elected city-wide), and one mayor (elected city-wide), to form a 19-member council.

The composition and structure of city council was the subject of two questions on the 2003 election ballot, an action initiated by Ward 3 Councillor Fred Tranquilli and his discussion paper, A Better Way, which proposed a smaller city council with 10 wards (one councillor per ward), plus the mayor elected city wide and the elimination of Board of Control for an 11-member city council.

While the yes votes prevailed, the overall voter turnout was less than 50 per cent and according to the provisions of the Municipal Act, the referendum results were not binding.

When council decided to maintain the status quo, a grassroots citizens' activism group, Imagine London, appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) to change the ward composition to 14 wards defined by communities of interest in the city, including a separate ward for the downtown core.

UWO law librarian and media professor Sam Trosow argued the case at the OMB for Imagine London arguing that smaller wards based on communities of interest would result in more "effective representation" for the electorate. This argument is based on a 1991 Supreme Court of Canada decision involving electoral boundaries in the Province of Saskatchewan (often cited as the "Carter" case).

The OMB ruled for the Imagine London petitioners in late December 2005 and while the city sought leave to appeal the OMB decision to Superior Court via a full-day hearing in January 2006, leave to appeal was denied when Justice McDermid released his decision on February 28, 2006.

In the 2006 municipal election, a number of candidates included in their platforms the abolition of Board of Control. Among them was Gina Barber, a member of Imagine London, who gained a seat on the board of control, coming in second only to the deputy mayor, Tom Gosnell.

Following the election, a task force composed of a number of councillors, controllers, and citizen representatives was established to make recommendations on governance. The task force held numerous meetings and public hearings. On the basis of its deliberations, it recommended that the board of control be abolished and its functions assumed by a combination of standing committees, delegation to staff and citizen groups and Committee of the Whole. The recommendations were placed before a public participation meeting and subsequently adopted by council in a vote of 14 to 5. Consequently, positions for Board of Control were not on the 2010 municipal ballot.

2000-2003[edit]

Council elected in the 2000 municipal election.

Councillor Ward Notes
Anne-Marie DeCicco-Best Mayor
Gord Hume Controller
Russ Monteith Controller
Bud Polhill Controller
Joe Swan Controller
Ab Chahbar Ward 1
Sandy Levin Ward 1
Joni Baechler Ward 2
Rob Alder Ward 2
Bernie MacDonald Ward 3
Fred Tranquilli Ward 3
Bill Armstrong Ward 4
Roger Caranci Ward 4
Cheryl Miller Ward 5
Gary Williams Ward 5
David Winninger Ward 6
Harold Usher Ward 6
Susan Eagle Ward 7
Ed Corrigan Ward 7

2003-2006[edit]

Council elected in the 2003 municipal election.

Councillor Ward Notes
Anne-Marie DeCicco-Best Mayor
Tom Gosnell Controller
Gord Hume Controller
Russ Monteith Controller
Bud Polhill Controller
Ab Chahbar Ward 1
Judy Bryant Ward 1
Joni Baechler Ward 2
Rob Alder Ward 2
Bernie MacDonald Ward 3
Fred Tranquilli Ward 3
Bill Armstrong Ward 4
Roger Caranci Ward 4
Cheryl Miller Ward 5
Sandy White Ward 5
David Winninger Ward 6
Harold Usher Ward 6
Susan Eagle Ward 7
Paul Van Meerbergen Ward 7

2006-2010[edit]

Council elected in the 2006 municipal election.

Councillor Ward Notes
Anne-Marie DeCicco-Best Mayor
Gina Barber Controller
Tom Gosnell Controller
Gord Hume Controller
Bud Polhill Controller
Roger Caranci Ward 1
Bill Armstrong Ward 2
Bernie MacDonald Ward 3
Stephen Orser Ward 4
Joni Baechler Ward 5
Nancy Ann Branscombe Ward 6
Walter Lonc Ward 7
Paul Hubert Ward 8
Susan Eagle Ward 9
Paul Van Meerbergen Ward 10
David Winninger Ward 11
Harold Usher Ward 12
Judy Bryant Ward 13
Cheryl Miller Ward 14

2010-2014[edit]

Council elected in the 2010 municipal election.

Councillor Ward Notes
Joe Fontana Mayor Resigned on June 19, 2014 following a criminal conviction.[1]
Bud Polhill Ward 1
Bill Armstrong Ward 2
Joe Swan Ward 3
Stephen Orser Ward 4
Joni Baechler Ward 5 Appointed interim mayor on June 25, 2014 after Fontana's resignation.[2]
Russell Monteith Ward 5 Appointed as interim councillor for Ward 5 after Baechler's accession to the mayoralty.[3]
Nancy Ann Branscombe Ward 6
Matt Brown Ward 7
Paul Hubert Ward 8
Dale Henderson Ward 9
Paul Van Meerbergen Ward 10
Denise Brown Ward 11
Harold Usher Ward 12
Judy Bryant Ward 13
Sandy White Ward 14

2014-2018[edit]

Council elected in the 2014 municipal election.

Councillor Ward Notes
Matt Brown Mayor
Michael Van Holst Ward 1
Bill Armstrong Ward 2
Mo Salih Ward 3
Jesse Helmer Ward 4
Maureen Cassidy Ward 5
Phil Squire Ward 6
Josh Morgan Ward 7
Paul Hubert Ward 8
Anna Hopkins Ward 9
Virginia Ridley Ward 10
Stephen Turner Ward 11
Harold Usher Ward 12
Tanya Park Ward 13
Jared Zaifman Ward 14

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]