London Youth Games

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London Youth Games
Official logo
Official logo
Founded
1977
Sports
30
Events
80
Competitors
104,000+
Reigning champions
Croydon

The London Youth Games is an annual multi-sport event held in London, England. The London Youth Games offer competitive opportunities for young participants aged 7 to 18 across 30 sports.[1][2] The London Youth Games are contested between the 32 London boroughs (as well as the City of London) and take place at venues around the capital all year round, with the focal point being a finals weekend at the National Sports Centre in Crystal Palace. The finals weekend traditionally takes place on the first weekend in July and they are free and open to all young people living in or going to school in London.[3] Over 70,000 young Londoners take part in the London Youth Games, making it the largest annual youth sports event in Europe.[1][2][4][5]

The London Youth Games are delivered by the London borough councils, several NGBs and over 2,000 volunteers each year.[6] A small team of full-time staff help to co-ordinate the LYG volunteering programme ' GamesForce ' which, together with volunteering agencies, help recruit, train and provide opportunities in media, events, sports, officiating and team leadership for persons aged 16 and above at the London Youth Games.[7][8][9]

The London Youth Games is funded by Balfour Beatty, Sport England National Lottery, London Councils and Thames Water among others.[10] The London Youth Games are organised and managed by the London Youth Games Foundation, which is a registered charity (1048705).[11][12] Representatives from the London boroughs and a number of independent trustees make up the Board of trustees.[6][13]

History[edit]

1977-1984[edit]

The London Youth Games is launched as one of two major sporting events to mark the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. The first Games were held that same year at the National Sports Centre at Crystal Palace, where it has remained since.[14]

After a year away, the Games returned in 1979 and continued to grow through the early 1980s with the introduction of more sports and a rise in the number of competitors.

1985-1989[edit]

RS Feva at the London Youth Games Regatta

London Youth Games Ltd is created in 1985 to cater for the growth and complexity of the organisation dedicated to running the London Youth Games and other London sports events for young people.

The 1986 London Youth Games sees the introduction of a water sports regatta at the Royal Albert and Victoria Docks. To celebrate its 10th anniversary, the 1987 London Youth Games features in cycling's Milk Race and the cross-country championships are introduced to the Games programme.[14]

1990-2000[edit]

In 1994, BAA Heathrow becomes first title sponsor of the London Youth Games which are renamed ' The London Heathrow Youth Games '. The Mini Games event for Londoners under the age of 11 is introduced. The Indoor Cricket Cup is set up in 1996. A then record 20,000 children take part in the 1998 London Youth Games.

The regatta is revamped in 1999 with the introduction of separate competitions in canoeing, sailing and rowing. Events for disabled athletes, swimming, football and girls rugby union are introduced.

A four-day national Youth Games final of the winning teams from all 43 Area Youth Games in the UK takes place in Southampton in August 2000. London sends two squads to represent them at 'The BAA Millennium Youth Games' in the 12 sports competitions.[14]

2001-2005[edit]

Zoe Smith weightlifting at the London Youth Games

The London Youth Games reach their 25th anniversary in 2001 with GB Olympic diver Tony Ally among its promoters.

The Queen, accompanied by her husband Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh, visit the London Youth Games Mini Games at Crystal Palace on 4 July as part of her Golden Jubilee Tour in 2002. She watches a relay race and presents winners medals.

London Youth Games establishes its own website. A festival stage with a big screen, 95.8 Capital FM and the Royal Navy entertain crowds at the 2003 London Youth Games finals weekend.

The 2004 London Youth Games are launched by former boxing champion Michael Watson and showcase the London 2012 bid during the launch and at the finals weekend. London Youth Games competitor Amber Charles (Newham, girls basketball), then 14, is chosen as a youth ambassador for the bid. Participants greet the Athens Olympic Flame as it arrives in the UK on its world tour.

BAA Heathrow's sponsorship of the Games ends in 2005 and a new public sector funding secured the London Youth Games' future with long-term funding from Sport England London and the Greater London Authority.[14]

Boris Johnson lights the flame at the 2010 London Youth Games Opening Ceremony

2006-2010[edit]

Balfour Beatty announces a six-year association with the London Youth Games in 2006. They sign as a title sponsor until 2013 and the London Youth Games are renamed ' The Balfour Beatty London Youth Games '.

British long-distance runner Mo Farah light the games torch at the opening ceremony of the 2007 London Youth Games.

The London Youth Games celebrate the 500,000th competitor in its history in 2009. The London Youth Games also gets its first patron with former competitor, Chicago Bulls and GB basketball captain Luol Deng and the London Youth Games Hall of Fame is launched with six former participants inducted.[15]

In 2010, the London Youth Games hit a record 50,000 competitors and became the largest annual youth sports event in Europe. Olympic 400m runner Christine Ohuruogu was the 2010 London Youth Games patron. Six more alumni were inducted into the Hall of Fame.[14][16] Foxy was introduced as the official London Youth Games mascot.

2011-present[edit]

2011 was another record year for the London Youth Games, as over 71,000 youngsters compete across 30 sports, with Richmond taking home the Jubilee Trophy. England women's footballer Rachel Yankey was the patron of that year's Games, and was also inducted into the 2011 Hall of Fame along with skier Chemmy Alcott, Paralympic swimmer Elaine Barrett, triathlete Tim Don, high jumper Dalton Grant, and squash player Paul Johnson.[17]

2012 saw the London Youth Games introduce a whole new raft of school competitions in line with the national School Games pathway and hosted the inaugural finals at Crystal Palace in March. Hounslow were the victors and took home the Schools Shield. Games alumni Zoe Smith and David Weir were joint patrons for a record-breaking year at the London Youth Games. In Olympic and Paralympic year, Croydon were crowned winners of the Jubilee Trophy for the first time in 18 years. It was announced later in the year that participation figures for the 2012 Balfour Beatty London Youth Games were 104,463 - a record in the history of the event.

The London Youth Games was well represented at both the 2012 Olympics and 2012 Paralympics with 44 competitors in total. LYG alumni contributed 14 medals to Team GB including gold medals for Mo Farah, David Weir, Bradley Wiggins, Joanna Rowsell and Naomi Riches.

Olympic Judo star and former Greenwich competitor Gemma Gibbons is Patron for the 2013 Games. Wandsworth won the Balfour Beatty London Youth Games School Games and are now the holders of the Schools Shield. The Games Finals will take place on July 6 and 7 at Crystal Palace National Sports Centre.

Sports[edit]

The London Youth Games consists of 80 competitions in 30 different sports.[1][18] The following sports are included in the London Youth Games programme:

Previous Sports[edit]

Karate, Skiing, Showjumping, Darts

The Jubilee Trophy[edit]

The Jubilee Trophy is presented to the borough with the best overall performance at the London Youth Games.[19]

In each competition, every position carries a points total. At the culmination of finals weekend, each borough's best 28 points totals are added together to give their final score. Penalties of up to 50 points can occur if a borough team does not attend or is disqualified from a competition they have entered. The borough with the highest overall score wins.[20][21]

The Jubilee Trophy

Previous Winners[edit]

Year Jubilee trophy Other trophies (only shown where awarded)
1977 Havering -
1978 no games held -
1979 Havering -
1980 Havering -
1981 Havering -
1982 Waltham Forest -
1983 Havering -
1984 Havering -
1985 Croydon -
1986 Bromley -
1987 Waltham Forest Inner London borough trophy - Southwark
1988 Bromley Inner London borough trophy - Southwark
1989 Enfield Inner London borough trophy - Islington
1990 Redbridge Inner London borough trophy - Islington
1991 Bromley Inner London borough trophy - Islington
1992 Redbridge Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth
1993 Redbridge Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth
1994 Croydon Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth
1995 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth
1996 Redbridge Inner London borough trophy - Lewisham
1997 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Greenwich
1998 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Greenwich
1999 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Southwark
2000 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Greenwich
2001 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Southwark
2002 Havering Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth
2003 Bexley Inner London borough trophy - Southwark
2004 Havering Disability trophy - Southwark

Inner London borough trophy - Southwark

Most improved borough - Greenwich

Rick Grice Fair Play trophy - Bexley

2005 Redbridge Disability trophy - Lewisham

Inner London borough trophy - Southwark

Most improved borough - Barnet

2006 Havering Disability trophy - Lewisham

Inner London borough trophy - Lewisham

Most improved borough - Hounslow

Rick Grice Fair Play trophy - Merton

2007 Bromley Disability trophy - Lewisham

Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth

Most improved borough - Tower Hamlets

2008 Bromley Disability trophy - Lewisham

Inner London borough trophy - Lewisham

Most improved borough - Kensington & Chelsea

2009 Havering Disability trophy - Wandsworth

Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth

Most improved borough - Richmond

Rick Grice Fair Play trophy - Westminster

Thames Water Regatta - Richmond

2010 Bromley Disability trophy - Croydon

Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth

Most improved borough - Southwark

Rick Grice Fair Play trophy - Barking & Dagenham

Thames Water Regatta - Richmond

2011 Richmond Disability trophy - Lewisham

Most improved borough - Lewisham

Thames Water Regatta - Richmond

2012 Croydon Disability trophy - Croydon

Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth

Most improved borough - Sutton

Schools Shield - Hounslow

Thames Water Regatta - Kensington & Chelsea

2013 Wandsworth Disability trophy - Croydon

Inner London borough trophy - Wandsworth

Most improved borough - Haringey

Schools Shield - Wandsworth

Thames Water Regatta - Richmond

Jubilee Trophy wins by borough[edit]

Wins Country Years
16 Havering 1977, 1979-81, 1983, 1984, 1995, 1997-2002, 2004, 2006, 2009
6 Bromley 1986, 1988, 1991, 2007, 2008, 2010
5 Redbridge 1990, 1992, 1993, 1996, 2005
3 Croydon 1985, 1994, 2012
2 Waltham Forest 1982, 1987
1 Enfield 1989
Bexley 2003
Richmond 2011
Wandsworth 2013
Havering celebrate winning the Jubilee Trophy in 2009

Alumni[edit]

The London Youth Games has been a stepping stone in the careers of many of Great Britain's finest Olympic and Paralympic athletes.[5][19][22][23][24] Below is a list of athletes from each sport who are former participants at the London Youth Games.[25][26]

Christine Ohuruogu at the 2010 London Youth Games

Athletics

Jackie Agyepong,[27] Dina Asher-Smith, Steve Backley, Julia Bleasdale, Abdul Buhari, Linford Christie, Tasha Danvers, Monique Davis, Tyrone Edgar,[28] Mo Farah, Jo Fenn,[29] Rikki Fifton, Dalton Grant,[30] John Herbert, JJ Jegede, Jade Johnson, Jeanette Kwakye, Joice Maduaka, Christine Ohuruogu, Tosin Oke, Samson Oni, Scott Overall, Abi Oyepitan, Asha Philip, John Regis, Laura Turner, David Weir, Benedict Whitby, Conrad Williams, Nadia Williams

Badminton

Aamir Ghaffar,[31] Rajiv Ouseph

Basketball

Ogo Adegboye, Matthew Bryan-Amaning, Arek Deng,[32] Ajou Deng, Luol Deng, Temi Fagbenle, Rosalee Mason,[33] Pops Mensah-Bonsu, Azania Stewart, Andrew Sullivan

Cricket

Rory Hamilton-Brown,[34] Susie Rowe

Cycling

Erick Rowsell, Jo Rowsell, Bradley Wiggins

Rio Ferdinand receives his London Youth Games Hall of Fame award in 2010

Diving

Tony Ally, Blake Aldridge,[35] Peter Waterfield

Fencing

James-Andrew Davis, Richard Kruse, Soji Aiyenuro, Curtis Miller

Football

Chris Bart-Williams, Siobhan Chamberlain, Ashley Cole, Rio Ferdinand, Dickson Etuhu, Gavin Hoyte, Justin Hoyte, Ledley King, Eartha Pond, Claire Rafferty, Lianne Sanderson,[27] Alex Scott, Danny Shittu, Raheem Sterling, Casey Stoney, Fara Williams, Rachel Yankey

Gymnastics

Chris Bower

Hockey

Darren Cheesman,[36] Dan Shingles

Judo

Victoria Dunn, Gemma Gibbons, Karina Bryant, Winston Gordon,[37] Michelle Holt, Ashley McKenzie

Kayak / Canoe

Leanne Brown, Lizzie Broughton,[38] Richard Hounslow, Lucy Ormorod

Mark Hunter at the 2010 London Youth Games Regatta

Karate

Rachel Newey

Netball

Kadeem Corbin, Sasha Corbin, Amanda Newton

Rugby

Maggie Alphonsi, Helen Clayton, Louise Horgan,[39] Katy Storie, Topsy Ojo

Rowing

Tom Aggar, Ryan Chamberlain,[40] Mark Hunter, Naomi Riches[41]

Skiing

Chemmy Alcott,[42] Aaron Tipping

Squash

Paul Johnson, Dominique Lloyd-Walter, Alison Waters[43]

Chemmy Alcott at the 2010 London Youth Games

Swimming

Elaine Barrett, Ellen Gandy,[44] Dervis Konuralp, Zara Long, Amy Marren, Craig Moate

Table Tennis

Darius Knight

Tennis

Anne Keothavong[45]

Triathlon

Tim Don, Stuart Hayes,[46] Jodie Swallow

Volleyball

Dami Bakare,[47] Peter Bakare,[48] Lucy Boulton, Natasha Brewer, Lizzie Reid, Darius Setsoafia, Yasser Slitti, Nikki Strachan

Weightlifting

Joanne Calvino, Darren Holloway, Jack Oliver, Zoe Smith[49]

Other

Brendano Lee (international male super model and actor),[50] Warren Russell (member of boy dance band Diversity)

Hall of Fame[edit]

Mo Farah at the 2010 Hall of Fame

The London Youth Games Hall of Fame was established in 2009. It is made up of former competitors who have progressed from the London Youth Games to the world stage.

Former 100m champion Linford Christie (Hammersmith and Fulham), 400m champion Christine Ohuruogu (Newham), javelin thrower Steve Backley (Bexley), Chicago Bulls and GB basketball captain Luol Deng (Croydon), rower Mark Hunter (Havering) and Paralympic swimmer Dervis Konuralp (Greenwich) were the first Hall of Fame inductees in 2009.[15][23]

They were followed in 2010 by 400m hurdler Tasha Danvers (Lambeth and Croydon), long-distance runner Mo Farah (Hounslow), England footballer Rio Ferdinand (Southwark), netball player Amanda Newton (Newham), Paralympic athlete David Weir (Sutton) and cyclist Bradley Wiggins (Camden).[5][16][24]

The third group of inductees in 2011 were skier Chemmy Alcott (Richmond), Paralympic swimmer Elaine Barrett (Hackney), triathlete Tim Don (Hounslow), high jumper Dalton Grant (Hackney), squash player Paul Johnson (Greenwich), and footballer Rachel Yankey (Brent).

In 2012 the inductees were cyclist Joanna Rowsell (Sutton), Paralympic rower Naomi Riches (Harrow), judo star and 2013 Patron Gemma Gibbons (Greenwich), canoeist Richard Hounslow (Harrow), England rugby star Maggie Alphonsi (Enfield) and world champion track star John Regis (Lewisham).

Between them, the current 24 members have amassed 35 Olympic or Paralympic medals, 77 World Championship medals and over 1000 international appearances for their country.[51]

Hall of Fame and Awards Evening[edit]

The annual Hall of Fame and Awards Evening not only sees former London Youth Games competitors inducted into the Hall of Fame, it recognises and presents special awards to individuals and organisations who make a major contribution to the success of the London Youth Games.[15][16][24][52]

The 2012 Hall of Fame and Awards evening took place on Tuesday 9 October at Lords Cricket Ground.[53]

Below is a list of previous award winners at the evening:[52]

Award winners at the 2010 Hall of Fame

The Jubilee Cup

Year Winner Year Winner
2010 GamesForce Team Leaders 2011 Eddie Land (Bexley) 2012 Jackie Valin (Wandsworth)

Community Partner of the Year

Year Winner Year Winner
2010 England Basketball 2011 Tennis Foundation 2012 British Cycling & Access Sport

Coach of the Year

Year Winner Year Winner
2010 Keir Apperly (Hackney cycling) 2011 Richard Sheridan (Lambeth sailing) 2012 Mark Betts (Brent)

GamesForce Volunteer of the Year (Age 16-25)

Year Winner Year Winner
2010 Jack Montoya (Hammersmith & Fulham) 2011 Helen Tang (Tower Hamlets) 2012 Roseanne Blaze (Greenwich)

Volunteer of the Year (Age 25+)

Year Winner Year Winner
2010 Lindsay Sartori (Bexley) 2011 George Brown (Newham) 2012 Craigie-Lee Paterson (Tower Hamlets)

Rick Grice Spirit of the Games Award

Year Winner
2011 Waltham Forest rowing 2012 CJ White & Sophie Hammond (Redbridge)

References[edit]

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External links[edit]