Lone Star Conference

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Lone Star Conference
(LSC)
Lone Star Conference logo
Established 1931
Association NCAA
Division Division II
Members 9
Sports fielded 16 (men's: 7; women's: 9)
Region Southwestern United States
Headquarters Richardson, Texas
Commissioner Stan Wagnon (since 2006)
Website lonestarconference.org
Locations
Lone Star Conference locations

The Lone Star Conference (LSC) is a collegiate athletic conference affiliated with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II level. Member institutions are located in the southwestern United States, with schools in Texas, Oklahoma and New Mexico.

The conference was formed in 1931 when five schools withdrew from the old Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Charter members included East Texas State (now Texas A&M–Commerce), North Texas State (now North Texas), Sam Houston State, Southwest Texas State (now Texas State), and Stephen F. Austin. Only Texas A&M–Commerce is still a member of LSC and in Division II; the other schools moved up to FBS status (North Texas and Texas State) or FCS (Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston).

History[edit]

Below is a timeline of the Conference's history.[1]

  • 1931 - The conference was formed on April 25, 1931 at a meeting in Denton, Texas; when five schools withdrew from the old Texas Intercollegiate Athletic Association. Charter members included East Texas State University (now Texas A&M University–Commerce), North Texas State University (now North Texas), Sam Houston State College (now Sam Houston State University), Southwestern State College (later Southwest Texas State University, then Texas State University–San Marcos, now Texas State University), and Stephen F. Austin State College (now Stephen F. Austin State University). The conference constitution required member schools to sponsor football, basketball, track & field and tennis. The 1931-32 basketball season was the first sport to be competed within the conference. At the first annual conference business meeting on December 12, 1931, Trinity University was admitted to the LSC, effectively for the 1932-33 academic year.
  • 1933 - Trinity University announced that the school was withdrawing from the LSC to return to the Texas Conference, but would still compete in the LSC until the 1933-34 academic year.
  • 1934 - At the annual LSC business meeting in December, conference presidents considered Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University–Kingsville), Sul Ross State University and West Texas State Teachers College (then West Texas State University, now West Texas A&M University) for admittance, but full membership was not granted at that time.
  • 1938 - The Lone Star Conference joined the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA).
  • 1940 - The LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted, upon recommendation of the LSC Directors of Athletics, to add golf as a conference sport with the first championship scheduled for May 17, 1941 (of the 1940-41 academic year).
  • 1941 - At the annual meeting on December 13, 1941, six days after the beginning of World War II, LSC members went on record as favoring "continuing a full sports program as long as it does not interfere with the nation's all-out war effort".
  • 1942 - At the December 12, 1942 conference meeting, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives approved football and basketball as conference sports during the war as long as transportation was available. All spring sports, excluding track, were discontinued.
  • 1945 - On November 9, 1945, and with the end of World War II, a called meeting of conference directors of athletics and faculty athletics representatives was held in Waco, Texas. Basketball, tennis, track, golf and football were planned as conference sports for the 1946-47 academic year. An invitation for conference membership was extended to the University of Houston and Southwestern University of Georgetown, Texas. Houston expressed a desire to schedule tentative basketball and football schedules, pending action to its board of regents. In addition, Trinity University and Howard Payne University were also discussed as possible new members.
  • 1945 - On December 8, 1945, the University of Houston was officially admitted to the LSC.
  • 1946 - On April 23, 1946, at a conference spring meeting, Trinity University was admitted to the LSC, effectively in the 1946-47 academic year; therefore, re-joining the conference after a 12-year hiatus.
  • 1946 - On December 7, 1946, at a conference winter meeting, a vote was taken to add baseball to the list of LSC sports, effectively in the 1947 spring season.
  • 1947 - On May 16, 1947, Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M–Kingsville) applied for admission to the LSC, but was never admitted due to some geographic concerns.
  • 1948 - On December 10–11, 1948, at a winter meeting, Hardin College (now Midwestern State University) was admitted to the LSC by unanimous vote.
  • 1949 - North Texas State University, the University of Houston, Trinity University and Hardin College withdrew from the LSC, effective June 1, 1949, to form the Gulf Coast Conference.
  • 1950 - Sul Ross State University and Lamar State College of Technology (now Lamar University) were admitted to the LSC.
  • 1953 - On December 12, 1953, Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M–Kingsville) was admitted to the LSC and began competition in the 1954 fall season of the 1954-55 academic year.
  • 1956 - McMurry College (now McMurry University) applied for LSC membership, but was voted down.
  • 1958 - Conference members approved a motion that the LSC must follow NCAA rules for football instead of NAIA rules.
  • 1959 - On May 12, 1959, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives rejected a motion that the LSC should be expanded to a nine-school league with the votes 6-2.
  • 1960 - The conference members voted to accept an invitation by the new Great Southwest Bowl committee to have the LSC football champion as the host team each year for the game in Grand Prairie, Texas in late December. Texas A&I defeated Arkansas Tech University 45-10 in the first such game on December 31, 1960. Bowl Chairman Cecil Owens said, "We hope the game will be a fine supplement to the Cotton Bowl".
  • 1962 - On December 7, 1962, at the annual conference meeting in Dallas, Texas, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives rejected a motion to allow LSC members optional membership in the NAIA or the NCAA; and rejected a motion that the decision of acceptance or refusal of post-season, playoff or championship events resided within the individual schools. A motion that LSC did not pledge its champions to the NAIA playoffs was also defeated
  • 1963 - On May 11, 1963, at the annual conference meeting in Brownwood, Texas, Lamar State College of Technology withdrew from the LSC, effective September 1, 1965.
  • 1964 - On May 9, 1964, McMurry College was admitted to the LSC with first participation scheduled for spring sports in the 1965 spring season of the 1964-65 academic year; followed by basketball (achieving full member status) in the 1965-66 academic year; and eventually football in the 1966 fall season of the 1966-67 academic year.
  • 1964 - Also in 1964, San Angelo College (now Angelo State University) attempted to apply to the LSC, but was told that LSC membership is limited to schools which had recognized four-year collegiate standing. San Angelo College's president Dr. B.M. Cavness told the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives that his school would assume such status in September 1965. He was advised to re-apply in December 1965.
  • 1965 - At the annual fall meeting in Dallas, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted in a secret ballot not to expand membership in the LSC.
  • 1968 - After achieving the status requirements since the first attempt, Angelo State University (formerly San Angelo College) was finally admitted to the LSC. Tarleton State University was also admitted to the LSC.
  • 1972 - McMurry College left the LSC.
  • 1973 - Abilene Christian University was admitted to the LSC.
  • 1975 - Tarleton State University withdrew from the LSC.
  • 1982 - The Lone Star Conference became an NCAA Division II athletic conference.
  • 1983 - Southwest Texas State University, Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin University left the LSC.
  • 1984 - The LSC Council of Presidents extended an invitation for LSC membership to West Texas State University (now West Texas A&M University), and the WTSU Board of Regents accepted invitation to begin LSC competition in the 1986-87 academic year. Eastern New Mexico University was automatically admitted to the LSC.
  • 1986 - The LSC Council of Presidents unanimously approved the membership of Central State University (now the University of Central Oklahoma) to establish the concept of a regional conference. Eventually, the school officially became a member of the LSC on July 1, 1987; effectively beginning competition within the conference in the 1987-88 academic year.
  • 1988 - The LSC Council of Presidents approved the admittance of Texas Woman's University to the LSC; effectively in the 1989-90 academic year. Cameron University was automatically admitted to the LSC.
  • 1989 - The LSC entered into consulting agreement with the Southwest Conference, allowing the SWC to advise the LSC in eligibility cases, aid in arbitration of protests, and provide interpretations of NCAA rules as well as administer the National Letter of Intent program. At the time, Shirley Morton of Angelo State University served as Secretary/Treasurer and Garner Roberts of Abilene Christian University as News Director of the LSC.
  • 1989 - West Texas State University dropped football and withdrew from the LSC, effectively at the end of the 1989-90 academic year.
  • 1990 - On November 30, 1990, the LSC Council of Presidents requested an LSC Expansion Committee to be formed to contact institutions in Oklahoma and Arkansas regarding conference membership.
  • 1991 - On April 28, 1991, the LSC Directors of Athletics considered a new football schedule recommendation from football coaches for the 1992 season if a replacement for West Texas State was not found.
  • 1991 - On April 30, 1991, the LSC Expansion Committee appointed to include Jerry Vandergriff of Angelo State, John "Skip" Wagnon of Central Oklahoma, Cecil Eager of Abilene Christian, and Dr. Margaret Harbison of East Texas State.
  • 1991 - On June 1, 1991, at the LSC Council of Presidents meeting, Angelo State president Dr. Drew Vincent said "there is a survival issue in the conference that has nothing to do with finances which was that the conference needed to be enlarged. East Central University, Southwestern Oklahoma State University and Northeastern State University might be interested in joining as well as Tarleton State University and Midwestern State University.
  • 1991 - On November 25, 1991, the LSC Directors of Athletics requested Central Oklahoma's John "Skip" Wagnon to invite representatives from Henderson State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Fort Hays State University and Midwestern State University to a meeting on January 7, 1992, during the NCAA Convention.
  • 1992 - On November 24, 1992, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives voted unanimously to recommend the Council of Presidents that an invitation should be extended to West Texas State University (who had re-instated back football), to re-join the conference.
  • 1993 - On January 14, 1993, the LSC Council of Presidents voted unanimously to extend an invitation to West Texas State University, having the school to begin LSC competition for football in the 1996 fall season of the 1996-97 academic year, and to begin LSC competition for all other sports, effectively in the 1994-95 academic year.
  • 1993 - On June 19, 1993, the LSC Council of Presidents accepted the withdraw of Cameron University from the LSC, effectively in the 1993 fall season of the 1993-94 academic year, following Cameron's decision to discontinue football.
  • 1994 - On January 9, 1994, the LSC Council of Presidents voted unanimously to extend an invitation to Tarleton State University to join the LSC and compete in all sports except football for the 1994-95 academic year if possible.
  • 1994 - On May 2, 1994, the LSC Faculty Athletics Representatives announced that the Southwest Conference could no longer provide services to the Lone Star Conference that was recommended a Conference Office to be established and a Commissioner to be hired.
  • 1994 - On June 11, 1994, the Council of Presidents voted unanimously to establish an LSC Office and to hire a Commissioner.
  • 1994 - On September 5, 1994, Fred Jacoby was named the first full-time Commissioner of the Lone Star Conference with the charge to expand the conference, to assist the new members in NAIA to NCAA transition, and to train a person for Commissioner in establishing a Conference Office.
  • 1994 - On October 10, 1994, Ouachita Baptist University president Ben Elrod said that his university would join Harding University in applying for LSC membership.
  • 1995 - On January 5, 1995, on a conference call of the LSC Council of Presidents, Midwestern State University was admitted to the LSC in a unanimous vote of 8-0, effective September 1, 1995, therefore re-joining the conference. Only six members competed in football (Eastern New Mexico, Abilene Christian, Angelo State, Texas A&M–Commerce [formerly East Texas State], Texas A&M–Kingsville [formerly Texas A&I] and Central Oklahoma).
  • 1995 - On January 8, 1995, at a joint meeting of the LSC Council of Presidents and the LSC Directors of Athletics at the NCAA Convention in San Diego, California, a thorough discussion of conference expansion was held with the potential of developing two divisions of eight members each. The catalyst had been the fragmentation of NAIA Division I with member institutions moving to NCAA Division II. Discussion centered on universities in Oklahoma and Arkansas that had applied to NCAA Division II and the rationale for expansion. The consensus was that the LSC presidents should host a meeting of Oklahoma presidents to share information on expansion and to study the feasibility of developing a regional conference. A meeting would be set up in the next 60 days.
  • 1995 - On August 29, 1995, on a conference call of the Executive Committee of the LSC Council of Presidents, a recommendation was approved to "take a proactive position regarding expansion with the development of a regional conference with two divisions".
  • 1995 - On September 28, 1995, the Executive Committee of the LSC Council of Presidents met with the presidents of Northeastern State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Harding University and Ouachita Baptist University. Focus of discussion was that with expansion, a strategic long range decision would be made to stabilize LSC membership, while providing flexibility for conference athletics programs in scheduling, postseason playoff competition, gender equity guidelines, marketing potential, media coverage, NCAA legislative strength, enhance image of the conference, and economy of scale for the conference administration and services. Further, there was a minimal downside to the proposed expansion/realignment.
  • 1995 - On October 11, 1995, on a conference call of the LSC Council of Presidents, a recommendation was unanimously approved to extend invitations to Northeastern State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, the University of Central Arkansas, Harding University, and Ouachita Baptist University for LSC membership. On November 14, 1995, all institutions listed above (except Central Arkansas) accepted membership in the LSC, effectively in the 1996-97 academic year.
  • 1996 - On March 6, 1996, Cameron University was re-admitted to the LSC, after a two-year hiatus.
  • 1996 - Southwestern Oklahoma State University and East Central University were admitted to the LSC. With 17 members, the Lone Star Conference began competition with a North/South divisional alignment.
  • 2000 - Harding University and Ouachita Baptist University withdrew from the LSC to join the Gulf South Conference.
  • 2010 - The University of the Incarnate Word was admitted to the LSC.
  • 2011 - East Central University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University and Southwestern Oklahoma State University left the LSC to join with a few Arkansas schools to form the Great American Conference; while the University of Central Oklahoma and Northeastern State University left to join the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association.
  • 2013 - The University of the Incarnate Word and Abilene Christian University left the LSC to join the Southland Conference of NCAA Division I. Abilene Christian was formerly a member of that conference from 1963-64 to 1972-73.

Member schools[edit]

Current members[edit]

Institution Location Founded Enrollment Nickname Colors Joined
Angelo State University San Angelo, Texas 1928 6,898 Rams           1968
Cameron University Lawton, Oklahoma 1908 5,449 Aggies           1988,
1996
Eastern New Mexico University Portales, New Mexico 1934 5,574 Greyhounds
&
Zias
          1984
Midwestern State University Wichita Falls, Texas 1922 6,093 Mustangs           1948,
1995
Tarleton State University Stephenville, Texas 1899 13,020 Texans
&
TexAnns
          1968,
1994
Texas A&M University–Commerce Commerce, Texas 1889 12,013 Lions           1931
Texas A&M University–Kingsville Kingsville, Texas 1925 6,147 Javelinas           1954
Texas Woman's University Denton, Texas 1901 12,465 Pioneers           1989
West Texas A&M University Canyon, Texas 1910 8,389 Buffaloes           1986,
1994
  • Cameron — left the LSC in 1994, and re-joined in 1996.
  • Midwestern State — left the LSC in 1949, and re-joined in 1995.
  • Tarleton State — left the LSC in 1976, and re-joined in 1994.
  • West Texas A&M — left the LSC in 1989, and re-joined in 1994.
  • Texas A&M–Commerce — previously known as East Texas State until 1996.
  • Texas A&M–Kingsville — previously known as Texas A&I until 1993.
  • West Texas A&M — previously known as West Texas State until 1993.
  • Texas Woman's — predominantly a women's institution (though officially co-ed), does not field men's sports.

Affiliate members[edit]

Institution Location Founded Enrollment Nickname Colors Joined Sport Primary
Conference
Harding University Searcy, Arkansas 1924 6,815 Bisons           2012 track & field indoor (M);
track & field indoor (W);
track & field outdoor (M);
track & field outdoor (W)
Great American
McMurry University Abilene, Texas 1923 1,430 War Hawks           2013
(track);
2014
(football)
football;
track & field indoor (M);
track & field indoor (W);
track & field outdoor (M);
track & field outdoor (W)
American Southwest
(NCAA D-III)
  • McMurry — has withdrawn D-II membership bid and will honor commitments. [2]

Former members[edit]

Institution Location Founded Nickname Joined Left Current
Conference
Abilene Christian University Abilene, Texas 1906 Wildcats 1973 2013 Southland
(NCAA D-I)
University of Central Oklahoma Edmond, Oklahoma 1890 Bronchos 1987 2011 Mid-America
East Central University Ada, Oklahoma 1909 Tigers 1995 2011 Great American
Harding University Searcy, Arkansas 1924 Bisons 1995 2000 Great American
University of Houston Houston, Texas 1927 Cougars 1945 1949 The American
(NCAA D-I)
Howard Payne University Brownwood, Texas 1889 Yellowjackets 1956 1987 American Southwest
(NCAA D-III)
University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio, Texas 1881 Cardinals 2009 2013 Southland
(NCAA D-I)
Lamar University Beaumont, Texas 1923 Cardinals 1950 1965 Southland
(NCAA D-I)
McMurry University Abilene, Texas 1923 War Hawks 1964 1972 American Southwest
(NCAA D-III)
University of North Texas Denton, Texas 1890 Mean Green 1931 1949 C-USA
(NCAA D-I)
Northeastern State University Tahlequah, Oklahoma 1909 RiverHawks 1995 2011 Mid-America
Ouachita Baptist University Arkadelphia, Arkansas 1886 Tigers 1995 2000 Great American
Sam Houston State University Huntsville, Texas 1879 Bearkats 1931 1984 Southland
(NCAA D-I)
Southeastern Oklahoma State University Durant, Oklahoma 1909 Savage Storm 1995 2011 Great American
Southwestern Oklahoma State University Weatherford, Oklahoma 1901 Bulldogs 1996 2011 Great American
Stephen F. Austin State University Nacogdoches, Texas 1921 Lumberjacks
&
Ladyjacks
1931 1984 Southland
(NCAA D-I)
Sul Ross State University Alpine, Texas 1917 Lobos 1950 1988 American Southwest
(NCAA D-III)
Texas State University San Marcos, Texas 1899 Bobcats 1931 1984 Sun Belt
(NCAA D-I)
Trinity University San Antonio, Texas 1869 Tigers 1932,
1946,
1957
1934,
1949,
1988
Southern Collegiate
(NCAA D-III)

Membership timeline [3][edit]

 Full member (all sports)   Full member (non-football)   Associate member (football-only)   Associate member (sport) 

[edit]

Conference sports
Sport Men's Women's
Baseball Green tickY
Basketball Green tickY Green tickY
Cross Country Green tickY Green tickY
Football Green tickY
Golf Green tickY Green tickY
Soccer Green tickY
Softball Green tickY
Tennis Green tickY
Track & Field Indoor Green tickY Green tickY
Track & Field Outdoor Green tickY Green tickY
Volleyball Green tickY

Men's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Baseball Basketball Cross
Country
Football Golf Track
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
Total
LSC
Sports
Angelo State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Cameron Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
Eastern New Mexico Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Midwestern State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 3
Tarleton State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Texas A&M-Commerce Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
Texas A&M-Kingsville Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 6
West Texas A&M Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Totals 6 8 7 7 4 5 6 43
Affiliate Members
Harding Green tickY Green tickY 2

Women's sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Basketball Cross
Country
Golf Soccer Softball Tennis Track
& Field
Indoor
Track
& Field
Outdoor
Volleyball Total
LSC
Sports
Angelo State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Cameron Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 5
Eastern New Mexico Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 7
Midwestern State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 9
Tarleton State Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Texas A&M-Commerce Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Texas A&M-Kingsville Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Texas Woman's Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 4
West Texas A&M Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY Green tickY 8
Totals 9 7 7 6 9 4 7 7 9 65
Affiliate Members
Harding Green tickY Green tickY 2

Other sponsored sports by school[edit]

School Men Women Co-ed
Soccer Tennis Equestrian Gymnastics Rodeo
Cameron IND
Eastern New Mexico IND NIRA
Midwestern State IND IND
Tarleton State IHSA NIRA
Texas A&M-Commerce NIRA
Texas A&M-Kingsville NIRA
Texas Woman's MIC
West Texas A&M IND IHSA NIRA
  • – D-I sport

Facilities[edit]

School Football stadium Capacity Basketball arena Capacity Baseball stadium Capacity
Angelo State San Angelo Stadium 17,500 Stephens Arena 6,500 Foster Field 4,200
Cameron Non-football school N/A Aggie Gym 1,600 McCord Field 1,200
Eastern New Mexico Greyhound Stadium 5,200 Greyhound Arena 4,800 Greyhound Field 350
Midwestern State Memorial Stadium 14,500 D.L. Ligon Coliseum 3,600 Non-baseball school N/A
Tarleton State Memorial Stadium 7,000 Wisdom Gymnasium 3,212 Cecil Ballow Baseball Complex 550
Texas A&M-Commerce Memorial Stadium 13,500 Texas A&M-Commerce Field House 5,000 Non-baseball school NA
Texas A&M-Kingsville Javelina Stadium 15,000 Steinke Physical Education Center 4,000 Nolan Ryan Field 4,000
Texas Woman's Non-football school N/A Kitty Magee Arena 1,800 Non-baseball school N/A
West Texas A&M Kimbrough Memorial Stadium 20,000 First United Bank Center 4,800 Potter County Memorial Stadium 7,000

Football Championships[edit]

This is a list of conference champions from the conference since 1997.

Year Overall Champion North Division South Division
1997 Texas A&M–Kingsville
(7-0-0)
Central Oklahoma
and
Southwestern Oklahoma
(5-1-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
(7-0-0)
1998 Central Oklahoma
(9-0-0)
Central Oklahoma
(9-0-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
(8-1-0)
1999 Southeastern Oklahoma
(7-2-0)
Southeastern Oklahoma
(7-2-0)
Angelo State
and
Eastern New Mexico
(6-3-0)
2000 Northeastern State
(5-0-0)
Northeastern State
(5-0-0)
Angelo State
and
Eastern New Mexico
(4-2-0)
2001 Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Tarleton State
(5-1-0)
Midwestern State
(4-1-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Tarleton State
(5-1-0)
2002 Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Abilene Christian
(5-1-0)
Tarleton State
(4-1-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Abilene Christian
(5-1-0)
2003 Texas A&M–Kingsville
(6-0-0)
Tarleton State
(4-1-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
(6-0-0)
2004 Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Midwestern State
(5-1-0)
Southeastern Oklahoma
and
Central Oklahoma
(4-1-0)
Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Midwestern State
(5-1-0)
2005 West Texas A&M
(6-1-0)
Southeastern Oklahoma
(5-0-0)
West Texas A&M
(6-1-0)
2006 West Texas A&M
and
Tarleton State
(5-1-0)
Southeastern Oklahoma
(4-1-0)
West Texas A&M
and
Tarleton State
(5-1-0)
2007 West Texas A&M
(6-0-0)
Southwestern Oklahoma
Texas A&M–Commerce
Southeastern Oklahoma
Central Oklahoma
and
Northeastern State
(3-2-0)
West Texas A&M
(6-0-0)
2008 Abilene Christian
(6-0-0)
Central Oklahoma
(5-0-0)
Abilene Christian
(6-0-0)
2009 Tarleton State
West Texas A&M
Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Midwestern State
(4-2-0)
Texas A&M–Commerce
(5-0-0)
Tarleton State
West Texas A&M
Texas A&M–Kingsville
and
Midwestern State
(4-2-0)
2010 Abilene Christian
(6-0-0)
Northeastern State
and
East Central
(5-1-0)
Abilene Christian
(6-0-0)
2011 Midwestern State
(8-0-0)
Division Split ended
2012 Midwestern State
(7-1-0)
and
West Texas A&M
(7-1-0)
2013 Eastern New Mexico
(5-1-0)
and
Tarleton State
(5-1-0)

Other Champions[edit]

This is a list of conference champions since 1997.

Year Men's Basketball Women's Basketball Men's Tennis Women's Tennis Men's Golf Women's Golf Men's Track Women's Track Volleyball Baseball Softball Men's Soccer Women's Soccer Men's Cross Country Women's Cross Country
1997 Central Oklahoma West Texas A&M Rained Out Rained Out Southwestern Oklahoma Did not sponsor sport Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Central Oklahoma Southeastern Oklahoma Did not sponsor sport West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
1998 Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Central Oklahoma Texas A&M–Commerce Southwestern Oklahoma Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Cameron Texas A&M–Kingsville Central Oklahoma Did not sponsor sport Midwestern State Abilene Christian Angelo State
1999 Midwestern State Abilene Christian Rained out Rained Out Cameron Northeastern State Rained out Rained out West Texas A&M Southeastern Oklahoma Southeastern Oklahoma Midwestern State Texas A&M–Commerce Abilene Christian Harding University
2000 Midwestern State Texas A&M–Kingsville Ouachita Baptist Abilene Christian Central Oklahoma Northeastern State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Southeastern Oklahoma West Texas A&M Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Central Oklahoma
2001 West Texas A&M Midwestern State Midwestern State Northeastern State Cameron Cameron Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Southeastern Oklahoma Midwestern State West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2002 Northeastern State Angelo State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Central Oklahoma Northeastern State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Texas A&M–Kingsville Midwestern State Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2003 West Texas A&M Northeastern State Abilene Christian Northeastern State Central Oklahoma Tarleton State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Southeastern Oklahoma Angelo State Midwestern State,
Northeastern State,
and
West Texas A&M
West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2004 Tarleton State Angelo State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Cameron Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Angelo State Abilene Christian Texas A&M–Kingsville Angelo State No Champion Texas A&M–Commerce Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2005 Texas A&M–Commerce Angelo State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Northeastern State Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Angelo State Abilene Christian No Champion Central Oklahoma Midwestern State
and
University of the Incarnate Word
Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2006 West Texas A&M West Texas A&M Midwestern State Abilene Christian Northeastern State Northeastern State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Central Oklahoma Midwestern State Midwestern State Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2007 Midwestern State Texas A&M–Commerce Abilene Christian Northeastern State Northeastern State Cameron Abilene Christian Abilene Christian West Texas A&M Angelo State Midwestern State Midwestern State
and
West Texas A&M
West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian
2008 Central Oklahoma West Texas A&M Cameron Abilene Christian Cameron Tarleton State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Midwestern State Texas A&M–Kingsville Angelo State Midwestern State Midwestern State Abilene Christian Midwestern State
2009 Midwestern State West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Northeastern State Tarleton State Abilene Christian Angelo State West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Angelo State Midwestern State
and
West Texas A&M
Central Oklahoma Abilene Christian Midwestern State
2010 Midwestern State West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Tarleton State Abilene Christian Angelo State West Texas A&M Abilene Christian Angelo State Midwestern State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Midwestern State
2011 Central Oklahoma Texas Woman's Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Central Oklahoma Tarleton State Abilene Christian Angelo State West Texas A&M Southeastern Oklahoma West Texas A&M Eastern New Mexico Midwestern State Eastern New Mexico Midwestern State
2012 Midwestern State Tarleton State Abilene Christian Abilene Christian Cameron Tarleton State Abilene Christian Angelo State West Texas A&M Angelo State Incarnate Word Incarnate Word West Texas A&M Eastern New Mexico West Texas A&M
2013 Tarleton State Midwestern State Cameron Abilene Christian Midwestern Tarleton State Angelo State Angelo State Angelo State Texas A&M-Kingsville Texas Woman's

Notable athletes[edit]

Abilene Christian University

Angelo State University

Cameron University

University of Central Oklahoma

Eastern New Mexico University

Midwestern State University

Tarleton State University

TAMU-Commerce

TAMU-Kingsville

Texas Woman's University

West Texas A&M University

References[edit]

External links[edit]