Long Hill Township, New Jersey

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Long Hill Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Long Hill
Millington Train Station, one of three train stations in Long Hill Township.
Millington Train Station, one of three train stations in Long Hill Township.
Long Hill Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Long Hill Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Long Hill Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Long Hill Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°41′05″N 74°29′31″W / 40.684827°N 74.492069°W / 40.684827; -74.492069Coordinates: 40°41′05″N 74°29′31″W / 40.684827°N 74.492069°W / 40.684827; -74.492069[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated March 23, 1866 (as Passaic Township)
Renamed November 3, 1992 (as Long Hill Township)
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Guy Piserchia (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator Neil Henry[4]
 • Clerk Christine Gatti[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 12.136 sq mi (31.432 km2)
 • Land 11.851 sq mi (30.693 km2)
 • Water 0.285 sq mi (0.739 km2)  2.35%
Area rank 191st of 566 in state
15th of 39 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 325 ft (99 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 8,702
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 8,774
 • Rank 263rd of 566 in state
22nd of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 734.3/sq mi (283.5/km2)
 • Density rank 410th of 566 in state
31st of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07933 - Gillette[13]
07946 - Millington[14]
07980 - Stirling[15][16]
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3402741362[17][2][18]
GNIS feature ID 0882196[19][2]
Website www.longhillnj.org

Long Hill Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,702,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 75 (-0.9%) from the 8,777 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 951 (+12.2%) from the 7,826 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Long Hill Township was incorporated as Passaic Township on March 23, 1866. On September 1, 1922, part of what was then Passaic Township was taken to form Harding Township.[21] On November 3, 1992, by a 1,901-1,821 margin, the voters elected to change the name of the municipality to Long Hill Township, a change largely driven by the desire to avoid confusion with the City of Passaic, some 22 miles (35 km) away.[22][23]

Unincorporated communities within Long Hill Township include Gillette, Millington, and Stirling, and the hamlet of Meyersville. Homestead Park is a subdivision that was first developed in the 1920s.

Geography[edit]

Long Hill Township is located at 40°41′05″N 74°29′31″W / 40.684827°N 74.492069°W / 40.684827; -74.492069 (40.684827,-74.492069). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 12.136 square miles (31.432 km2), of which, 11.851 square miles (30.693 km2) of it is land and 0.285 square miles (0.739 km2) of it (2.35%) is water.[1][2]

The township is located in the most southern part of Morris County. It is bounded by the Passaic River on the south and west and by the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge on the north. It borders both Union and Somerset counties.

Long Hill Television[edit]

A Government-access television (GATV) cable TV channel is available for citizens of Long Hill Township that has important news updates, local activities, local weather, storm warnings, etc. It is on Comcast channel 29 (all programming) and Verizon FiOS channels 37 (public meetings and programs) and 38 (community bulletin board).

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,624
1880 1,896 16.7%
1890 1,821 −4.0%
1900 2,141 17.6%
1910 2,165 1.1%
1920 2,373 9.6%
1930 2,149 −9.4%
1940 2,664 24.0%
1950 3,429 28.7%
1960 5,537 61.5%
1970 7,393 33.5%
1980 7,275 −1.6%
1990 7,826 7.6%
2000 8,777 12.2%
2010 8,702 −0.9%
Est. 2012 8,774 [11] 0.8%
Population sources:
1870-1920[24] 1870[25][26]
1880-1890[27] 1890-1910[28]
1910-1930[29] 1930-1990[30]
2000[31][32] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,702 people, 3,105 households, and 2,434 families residing in the township. The population density was 734.3 per square mile (283.5 /km2). There were 3,226 housing units at an average density of 272.2 per square mile (105.1 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.61% (7,885) White, 0.62% (54) Black or African American, 0.09% (8) Native American, 5.98% (520) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.06% (92) from other races, and 1.63% (142) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.06% (614) of the population.[8]

There were 3,105 households, of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.6% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.19.[8]

In the township, 25.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 20.3% from 25 to 44, 33.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.9 years. For every 100 females there were 97.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $120,691 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,097) and the median family income was $142,059 (+/- $14,704). Males had a median income of $91,509 (+/- $24,098) versus $75,558 (+/- $11,204) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $54,508 (+/- $4,818). About 1.7% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 1.6% of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 8,777 people, 3,139 households, and 2,457 families residing in the township. The population density was 726.8 people per square mile (280.5/km²). There were 3,206 housing units at an average density of 265.5 per square mile (102.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 92.75% White, 0.39% African American, 0.17% Native American, 4.79% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.56% from other races, and 1.31% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.45% of the population.[31][32]

There were 3,139 households out of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.6% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.7% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.19.[31][32]

In the township the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 31.2% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the township was $84,532, and the median income for a family was $103,037. Males had a median income of $71,827 versus $46,100 for females. The per capita income for the township was $42,613. About 2.3% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 3.2% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Long Hill Township is governed under the Township form of government with a five-member Township Committee. The Township Committee is elected directly by the voters in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.[6] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor.

As of 2013, the members of the township committee are Mayor Guy Piserchia(R; term ends December 31, 2015), Deputy Mayor Cornel Schuler (R; 2014), Michael Mazzucco (R; 2013), Brendan Rae (R, 2015) and Guy Roshto (R, 2014).[34][35]

Federal, state, and county representation[edit]

Long Hill Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[36] and is part of New Jersey's 21st state legislative district.[9][37][38] Prior to the 2010 Census, Long Hill Township had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[39]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[40] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[41][42] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[43][44]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 21st Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Thomas Kean, Jr. (R, Westfield) and in the General Assembly by Jon Bramnick (R, Westfield) and Nancy Munoz (R, Summit).[45][46] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[47] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[48]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[49] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[50] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[51] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[52] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[53] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[54] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[55] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[56] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[57][50][58] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[59] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[60] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[50][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,854 registered voters in Long Hill Township, of which 1,154 (19.7%) were registered as Democrats, 2,245 (38.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,450 (41.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 5 voters registered to other parties.[62]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.0% of the vote here (2,789 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.4% (2,024 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (60 votes), among the 4,894 ballots cast by the township's 6,155 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.5%.[63] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 59.8% of the vote here (2,808 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 39.0% (1,833 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (43 votes), among the 4,696 ballots cast by the township's 6,112 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.8.[64]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.4% of the vote here (2,284 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 24.4% (865 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.1% (358 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (14 votes), among the 3,546 ballots cast by the township's 6,058 registered voters, yielding a 58.5% turnout.[65]

Education[edit]

The Long Hill Township School System serves public school students in Pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[66]) are Gillette School[67] (grades PreK-1, 166 students), Millington School[68] (2-5, 418) and Central Middle School[69] (6-8, 345).[70]

Long Hill Township's high school students in public school attend Watchung Hills Regional High School in Warren Township. Students from Long Hill Township and from the neighboring communities of Green Brook Township, Warren Township, and Watchung (in Somerset County) attend the school.[71]

St. Vincent de Paul School is a Catholic school operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. St. Vincent is a private school and also serves as a Roman Catholic church for the Long Hill community.[72][73]

Library[edit]

The Long Hill Township Library began about 1880 in what was then known as Passaic Township. At the time a group of women in Millington formed a reading club purchasing a small number of books to trade amongst themselves. A similar group was established in Meyersville. In 1920, when the Morris County Library was built, the groups joined the county system and books on loan from the county were housed in the homes of the associations’ members.

By the 1950s, the Millington Association’s Library had relocated to the Town Hall and the Meyersville group occupied one room in the town’s Central School. In 1956, however, the Township asked the Millington Association to find other quarters, and the Central School location had steadily become less than satisfactory due to increasing enrollment. A referendum in the amount of $25,000 for the construction of a new building was submitted to the community. The measure passed by two votes. The new library opened in 1958 on Central Avenue in Stirling as the Passaic Township Free Public Library with a paid director and several volunteers.

By 1968, the library’s collection had grown substantially and plans were made for a new addition to the building. Another $25,000 was raised and the addition was completed in 1972. A later addition followed in the nineteen eighties. The library remained on Central Avenue until 2005 when an entirely new building was dedicated in April of that year. In the meantime, in 1992, the township had formally changed its name to Long Hill Township and the Passaic Township Free Public Library was renamed as the Long Hill Township Free Public Library.

The Long Hill Township Library now occupies a site in Gillette, adjacent to Township Hall. The library contains 16,000 square feet (1,500 m2) of space and has a capacity for 72,000 books. The library is a member of the Morris Automated Information Network consortium. Through this consortium residents of Long Hill Township have access to library materials at 37 area libraries.[74]

Communications[edit]

Long Hill is in Area code 908. The legacy exchange is 908-647 (MIllington-7), which was one of the last exchanges in New Jersey to be converted from manual to dial operation.

The current cable company servicing the area is Comcast which provides local TV, internet, and phone service. Most of Long Hill now also has access to Verizon's FiOS service. Patriot Media no longer serves the area because it was sold to Comcast in early 2008.

Long Hill Township operates a public service television channel on Comcast (Channel 25) and Verizon (Channel 37).

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Long Hill Township include:

  • Gina Genovese (born 1959), businesswoman and politician who has served as mayor of the township and ran for State Senate.[75]
  • Jack H. Jacobs (born 1945), Medal of Honor recipient in 1969 for his heroic actions during the Vietnam War.[76]
  • Rene Thomas Rovtar (born 1958) graduate of the Long Hill Township School District serving as superintendent of the Long Hill Township Public Schools.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Directory, Long Hill Township. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  5. ^ Municipal Clerk and Registrar, Long Hill Township. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 94.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Long Hill, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Long Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 9. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Long Hill township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Gillette, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Millington, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stirling, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  16. ^ Post Offices, Long Hill Township. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  17. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 28, 2012.
  19. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  21. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 193 (re Harding) and 195 (re Long Hill). Accessed October 28, 2012.
  22. ^ Nieves, Evelyn. "How Green Was My Passaic, Now Long Hill", The New York Times, December 3, 1992. pg. B1. Accessed September 8, 2013. "No one used to mind when the City of Passaic and the Township of Passaic, 22 miles away, were confused.... Now, Passaic Township, incorporated in 1866, is history. On Election Day, voters rechristened its 12 square miles Long Hill Township."
  23. ^ General Information, Long Hill Township. Accessed July 14, 2013.
  24. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  25. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 268, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed September 8, 2013. "Passaic contained a population in 1870 of 1,624. It wss formed from Morris in 1866."
  26. ^ Walker, Francis A. A Compendium of the Ninth Census, 1870, United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  27. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  28. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  30. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Long Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Long Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Long Hill township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  34. ^ Township Committee, Long Hill Township. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  35. ^ Morris County Manual 2013, p. 41. Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  36. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  37. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 60, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  38. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  40. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  41. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  42. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  43. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  44. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  46. ^ District 21 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 2, 2014.
  47. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  48. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  49. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed October 1, 2013.
  50. ^ a b c Morris County Manual 2014, Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  51. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  52. ^ David Scapicchio, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  53. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  54. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  55. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  56. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  57. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  58. ^ Meet the Freeholders, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  59. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  60. ^ About Us: Sheriff Edward V. Rochford, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  61. ^ What is a Surrogate?, Morris County Surrogate Court. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  62. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  63. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  64. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  65. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  66. ^ School Data for the Long Hill Township School System, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  67. ^ Gillette School, Long Hill Township School System. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  68. ^ Millington School, Long Hill Township School System. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  69. ^ Central Middle School, Long Hill Township School System. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  70. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Long Hill Township School System, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  71. ^ Somerset County School Districts-Sending/Receiving/Regional, Somerset County Superintendent of Schools. Accessed November 17, 2012.
  72. ^ Home page, St. Vincent de Paul Catholic School. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  73. ^ Morris County Elementary / Secondary Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Paterson. Accessed July 26, 2008.
  74. ^ Home page, Long Hill Township Library. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  75. ^ Schillaci, Sarah. "Long Hill's former mayor is a lone voice for municipal consolidation", The Star-Ledger, March 21, 2010. Accessed November 17, 2012. "'That’s not nearly enough', says Gina Genovese. The former mayor of Long Hill Township and one-time Democratic candidate for State Senate is the executive director of Courage to Connect NJ, an organization that advocates municipal consolidation."
  76. ^ James, George. "COMMUNITIES; Those Whom We Honor", The New York Times, May 28, 2000. Accessed September 16, 2013. "'Especially now,' said Jack H. Jacobs, who received his medal for his service in Vietnam, as he recently sat sipping coffee in the kitchen of his big Victorian house in Millington."

External links[edit]

Surrounding communities[edit]