Longus capitis muscle

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Longus capitis muscle
Longus capitis.png
The anterior vertebral muscles.
Details
Latin musculus longus capitis
anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cervical vertebræ
basilar part of the occipital bone
C1-C3/C4
Actions flexion of neck at atlanto-occipital joint
Identifiers
Gray's p.395
Dorlands
/Elsevier
m_22/12549725
TA A04.2.01.003
FMA FMA:46308
Anatomical terms of muscle

The longus capitis muscle (rectus capitis anticus major), broad and thick above, narrow below, arises by four tendinous slips, from the anterior tubercles of the transverse processes of the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cervical vertebræ, and ascends, converging toward its fellow of the opposite side, to be inserted into the inferior surface of the basilar part of the occipital bone.

It is innervated by a branch of cervical plexus.

Longus capitis has several actions:

acting unilaterally, to:

  • flex the head and neck laterally
  • rotate the head ipsilaterally

acting bilaterally:

  • flex the head and neck[1]

Additional images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.gpnotebook.co.uk/simplepage.cfm?ID=-1972699056

External links[edit]

This article incorporates text from a public domain edition of Gray's Anatomy.