Lopatcong Township, New Jersey

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Lopatcong Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lopatcong
Map of Lopatcong Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Lopatcong Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lopatcong Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lopatcong Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°42′52″N 75°09′21″W / 40.714352°N 75.155769°W / 40.714352; -75.155769Coordinates: 40°42′52″N 75°09′21″W / 40.714352°N 75.155769°W / 40.714352; -75.155769[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated March 7, 1851
Government[5]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Small Municipality)
 • Mayor Douglas Steinhardt (R, term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk M. Beth Dilts[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 7.159 sq mi (18.541 km2)
 • Land 7.098 sq mi (18.384 km2)
 • Water 0.061 sq mi (0.157 km2)  0.85%
Area rank 242nd of 566 in state
16th of 22 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 384 ft (117 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 8,014
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 8,046
 • Rank 287th of 566 in state
3rd of 22 in county[11]
 • Density 1,129.0/sq mi (435.9/km2)
 • Density rank 365th of 566 in state
6th of 22 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08865[12]
Area code(s) 908[13]
FIPS code 3404141490[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882252[1][16]
Website www.lopatcongtwp.com

Lopatcong Township /lˈpætkɒŋ/ is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 8,014,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 2,249 (+39.0%) from the 5,765 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 713 (+14.1%) from the 5,052 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] The township is part of the eastern region of the Lehigh Valley.

Lopatcong Township was featured in a 2003 article in The New York Times which discussed problems of public school financing in suburban communities and various strategies communities have adopted to deal with the problem.[18]

Delaware Park (2010 Census population of 700[19]) and Lopatcong Overlook (population 734 as of 2010[20]) are census-designated places and unincorporated areas located within the township.[21][22][23]

History[edit]

What is now Lopatcong Township was created as Phillipsburg Township on March 7, 1851, by an act approved by the New Jersey Legislature from portions of Greenwich Township and Harmony Township. After Phillipsburg was incorporated as an independent municipality on March 8, 1861, the township changed its name to Lopatcong as of March 18, 1863, after a creek in the area.[24][25]

The name of the creek and township — Lopatcong — came from four words of the Lenni Lenape Native AmericansLowan peek achtu onk, which meant "winter water place for deer".[26]

Geography[edit]

Lopatcong Township is located at 40°42′52″N 75°09′21″W / 40.714352°N 75.155769°W / 40.714352; -75.155769 (40.714352,-75.155769). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 7.159 square miles (18.541 km2), of which, 7.098 square miles (18.384 km2) of it was land and 0.061 square miles (0.157 km2) of it (0.85%) of it was water.[1][2]

Lopatcong is made up of several neighborhoods, including Morris Park, Delaware Park, Rosehill Heights, Brakeley Park, Lows Hollow, Country Hills, Meadow View, Scott's Mountain and Overlook.[citation needed]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 3,741
1870 1,150 * −69.3%
1880 1,591 38.3%
1890 1,738 9.2%
1900 1,982 14.0%
1910 766 −61.4%
1920 1,050 37.1%
1930 1,269 20.9%
1940 1,450 14.3%
1950 1,737 19.8%
1960 2,703 55.6%
1970 3,144 16.3%
1980 4,998 59.0%
1990 5,052 1.1%
2000 5,765 14.1%
2010 8,014 39.0%
Est. 2013 8,046 [10][27] 0.4%
Population sources: 1860-1920[28]
1860-1870[29] 1880-1890[30]
1890-1910[31] 1910-1930[32]
1930-1990[33] 2000[34][35] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade[24]

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,014 people, 3,136 households, and 2,089 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,129.0 per square mile (435.9 /km2). There were 3,420 housing units at an average density of 481.8 per square mile (186.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 87.22% (6,990) White, 6.03% (483) Black or African American, 0.14% (11) Native American, 4.18% (335) Asian, 0.01% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.81% (65) from other races, and 1.61% (129) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.99% (480) of the population.[7]

There were 3,136 households, of which 30.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.7% were married couples living together, 7.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.4% were non-families. 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.09.[7]

In the township, 23.1% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 18.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.3 years. For every 100 females there were 88.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.6 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $77,320 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,889) and the median family income was $89,317 (+/- $6,056). Males had a median income of $61,771 (+/- $6,980) versus $49,338 (+/- $4,584) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $33,633 (+/- $2,586). About 0.7% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[36]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 5,765 people, 2,143 households, and 1,523 families residing in the township. The population density was 814.6 people per square mile (314.4/km²). There were 2,429 housing units at an average density of 343.2 per square mile (132.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.27% White, 1.13% African American, 0.07% Native American, 1.63% Asian, 0.49% from other races, and 0.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.99% of the population.[34][35]

There were 2,143 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.5% were married couples living together, 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.9% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.09.[34][35]

In the township the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 4.4% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 22.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 85.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.3 males.[34][35]

The median income for a household in the township was $50,918, and the median income for a family was $65,545. Males had a median income of $52,540 versus $30,967 for females. The per capita income for the township was $24,333. About 4.7% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over.[34][35]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Lopatcong Township is governed by the Faulkner Act (Small Municipality) form of government, which is available under the terms of the Faulkner Act only for those municipalities with a population of under 12,000. The government consists of a Mayor and a four-member Township Council, with all positions elected at large in partisan elections. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a three-year term of office. Council members are elected at large to serve a term of three years on a staggered basis, so that two seats come up for election each year that the mayor is not up for election.[5]

As of 2013, the Lopatcong Township Committee consists of Mayor Douglas J. Steinhardt (R, term ends December 31, 2014), Council President Victor S. Camporine (R, 2013), Lou Belcaro (R, 2015), Lori Ciesla (I, 2015) and Maureen McCabe (I, 2013).[37][38][39][40][41] In the 2012 General Election, Lori Ciesla who ran as part of the independent slate of Responsible Lopatcong Leadership won election, as did Maureen McCabe who won an unexpired one-year term when she defeated Republican incumbent Andrew Horun who had been appointed earlier in the year to fill the vacant seat of H. Matthew Curry.[42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Lopatcong Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[8][44][45] Prior to the 2010 Census, Lopatcong Township had been part of the 5th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[46]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[52][53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are chosen at-large on a staggered basis in partisan elections with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2014, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014) and Freeholder Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2016).[56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[57] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[58][59] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,153 registered voters in Lopatcong Township, of which 1,391 (27.0% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,470 (28.5% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 2,288 (44.4% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[61] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 64.3% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 83.6% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[61][62]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 1,964 votes here (52.8% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,638 votes (44.0% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 51 votes (1.4% vs. 1.7%), among the 3,720 ballots cast by the township's 5,386 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.1% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[63][64] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 1,985 votes here (51.9% vs. 55.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,730 votes (45.2% vs. 41.4%) and other candidates with 46 votes (1.2% vs. 1.6%), among the 3,827 ballots cast by the township's 5,090 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.2% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,994 votes here (57.5% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,419 votes (40.9% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 30 votes (0.9% vs. 1.3%), among the 3,467 ballots cast by the township's 4,536 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.4% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,455 votes here (58.6% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 736 votes (29.6% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 228 votes (9.2% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 35 votes (1.4% vs. 1.5%), among the 2,484 ballots cast by the township's 4,981 registered voters, yielding a 49.9% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[67]

Education[edit]

The Lopatcong Township School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade.[68] As of the 2010-11 school year, the district and its two schools had a total enrollment of 1,287 students and 75.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 17.11.[69] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[70]) are Lopatcong Elementary School (grades PreK-4, 480 students) and Lopatcong Middle School (5-8, 433 students).[71] Before the Middle School opened in 2003, students would attend the Elementary School through eighth grade; The middle school was constructed in the wake of increasing enrollment, which climbed more than 50% from just over 500 in 1995 to more than 750 by 2001.[18]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Phillipsburg High School in Phillipsburg as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Phillipsburg School District. The high school also serves students from four other sending communities: Alpha, Bloomsbury (in Hunterdon County), Greenwich Township and Pohatcong Township.[68][72]

Students from the township and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[73] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[74] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[68][75]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 45.59 miles (73.37 km) of roadways, of which 35.19 miles (56.63 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.56 miles (10.56 km) by Warren County and 3.84 miles (6.18 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[76]

The main county road that passes through is County Route 519 which passes through in the eastern part. Route 57 traverses towards the center and has its western end at US 22 which also passes through in the southern section of the township.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit bus service is provided on the 890 and 891 routes.[77]

Film community[edit]

Lopatcong Township was the primary location for the independent film Several Ways to Die Trying. The film's writer/director, Glen Tickle, as well as members of the cast and crew are residents of the township.[78]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
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  4. ^ Municipal Clerk/Administrator, Lopatcong Township. Accessed September 21, 2012.
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  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Lopatcong, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 7, 2013.
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  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lopatcong, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Lopatcong, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 16, 2013.
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  18. ^ a b Mansnerus, Laura. "Great Haven for Families, but Don't Bring Children", The New York Times August 13, 2003. Accessed June 10, 2013. "That describes Lopatcong, near Interstate 78 at the state's western edge. As farms gave way to subdivisions of single-family houses, the population rose to 6,991 in 2002 from 5,765 in 2000. Enrollment at the town's elementary school was 503 in 1995 and 755 in 2001, and it is expected to reach 900 this fall, when a new middle school will open."
  19. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Delaware Park CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  20. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Lopatcong Overlook CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 20, 2012.
  21. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  22. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
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  25. ^ Snell, James P. (1881) History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. (Centennial ed., Harmony, NJ: Harmony Press, 1981) p.682
  26. ^ Poncavage, Joanna. "Lenape language Legacy; In towns, creeks and more, Indian nation left its mark on our region", The Morning Call, November 14, 2008. Accessed September 21, 2012. "LOPATCONG - From Lenape words: Lowan peek achtu onk Meaning: Winter water place for deer"
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  29. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed June 6, 2013. "Lopatcong contains 1,150 inhabitants [in 1870].... Phillipsburg is on the Delaware directly opposite in Pennsylvania The city of the same name is divided into three wards The population in 1860 was 3,741; and in 1870, 5,932." Note that the 1860 population listed for Phillipsburg city is actually the data for Phillipsburg township, before it was renamed as Lopatcong.
  30. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 6, 2013.
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  42. ^ Foster, David. "Independents take two seats, Republican one on Lopatcong Township Council, according to unofficial results", The Express-Times, November 7, 2012. Accessed June 10, 2013. "Independent candidate Lori Ciesla secured a nod for the three-year seat along with Republican Louis Belcaro.... Independent Maureen McCabe squeaked out a win by four votes over incumbent Andrew Horun for the one-year term. Horun was appointed by council in April to fill a vacancy left by H. Matthew Curry."
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  50. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  52. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 7, 2014.
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  54. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
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  56. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
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  58. ^ Message from Surrogate, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
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  65. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed June 8, 2013.
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  67. ^ 2009 Governor: Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed June 8, 2013.
  68. ^ a b c 2012 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed May 31, 2013.
  69. ^ District information for the Lopatcong Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  70. ^ Data for the Lopatcong Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  71. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Lopatcong Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  72. ^ Central Student Registration Information, Phillipsburg School District. Accessed May 31, 2013. "Sending District Students: Students that reside in Alpha, Bloomsbury, Greenwich, Lopatcong, and Pohatcong send students in grades 9 - 12 to Phillipsburg High School."
  73. ^ Overview, Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Enrollment is open to any child in New Jersey, with preference for students from the districts of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, Knowlton and North Warren Regional."
  74. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  75. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  76. ^ Warren County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  77. ^ Warren County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed September 21, 2012.
  78. ^ Longsdorf, Amy. "Celebrating Lehigh Valley filmmakers2nd annual festival gives a big screen to locally produced works, including features, shorts, web series", The Morning Call, October 26, 2012. Accessed June 10, 2013.

External links[edit]