Lorca (album)

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Lorca
Studio album by Tim Buckley
Released May 1970
Recorded 18, 19 & 26 September 1969, Whitney Studios, Glendale, CA
Genre Jazz-Rock, Folk-Rock, Avant-garde
Length 39:24
Label Elektra
Producer Dick Kunc
Tim Buckley chronology
Blue Afternoon
(1969)
Lorca
(1970)
Starsailor
(1970)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 3/5 stars[1]

Lorca is the fifth album by singer-songwriter Tim Buckley, released in 1970. It was named after Spanish poet Federico Garcia Lorca,[2] and was recorded simultaneously with Blue Afternoon, though notably different in style. It was one of Buckley's two avant-garde albums, and explored some sounds and ideas he had never used before. Also importantly, it was an attempt to break away from more traditional and prevalent pop music songwriting styles, such as the verse/chorus binary form, that Buckley had explored in the earlier parts of his career.[3]

Lorca exemplifies the beginning of Buckley's move away from his folk-rock roots and towards a free-form mix of jazz, avant-garde and folk. Musically, Buckley uses the lack of a constant rhythm section to drive the songs forward with his voice. Many songs make use of a chromatic scale which makes them stand in stark contrast to Buckley's earlier melodic works. The lyrics of Lorca also represent a departure from his previous traditional folk-style writing, instead Buckley uses a more abstract descriptive style, avoiding direct narratives and standard song themes. This is a reflection of the poetry, such as the works of poet Federico García Lorca, that Buckley and guitarist Lee Underwood were reading at the time.[4] The album's opener and title track is a much less guitar-based song, something in contrast to Buckley's previous works, and this would be a theme in Buckley would explore more in his later avant-garde works.

According to Larry Beckett, his songwriting partner from Tim Buckley and Goodbye and Hello, he was purposely trying to alienate fans at this point. Buckley described it as an album that, "To this day, you can't put...on at a party without stopping things; it doesn't fit in."

Buckley describes the second track as a "real advance," and that "It deals with a ballad in a totally personal, physical presentation... It has to be done slowly; it has to take five or six minutes; it has to be a movement. It has to hold you there and make you aware that someone is telling you something about himself in the dark."[3]

The album was written during a very prolific time for Buckley as he recorded and released four albums within a space of less than two years. Two of the albums, Blue Afternoon and Lorca were recorded in the space of a single month.[3] Buckley completed these albums around the same time as an obligation to Warner Bros. Records, and also separately, Elektra Records owner Jac Holzman. Holzman, responsible for signing the artist, was in the process of selling the company and Buckley wanted to fulfil his contract in the time before Holzman's departure.


Track listing[edit]

All tracks written by Tim Buckley.

  1. "Lorca" – 9:53
  2. "Anonymous Proposition" – 7:43
  3. "I Had a Talk With My Woman" – 6:01
  4. "Driftin'" – 8:12
  5. "Nobody Walkin'" – 7:35

Personnel[edit]

Album Personnel[edit]

  • Executive Producer - Herb Cohen
  • Engineer/Producer - Dick Kunc
  • Photography - Ed Caraeff
  • Photo Conversion - J. Seele
  • Design - Robert L. Heimall
  • Art Direction - William S. Harvey

References[edit]

  1. ^ AllMusic review
  2. ^ "Tim Buckley interview: "The High Flyer"". Retrieved 2008-05-04. [dead link]
  3. ^ a b c Tim Buckley Interview at timbuckley.com
  4. ^ ""father?" "yes, son?" "i want to kill you."". Option Magazine July/August 95. Archived from the original on 2008-05-19. Retrieved 2008-06-03. 

External links[edit]