Lord, I Want to Be a Christian

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Sheet music for Lord, I Want to Be a Christian

Lord, I Want to Be a Christian is an American spiritual. It was likely composed in 1750s Virginia by African-American slaves exposed to the teaching of evangelist Samuel Davies.[1] The music and lyrics were first printed in the 1907 Folk Songs of the American Negro, edited by Frederick Work.[2][3] The song has been recorded by artists including Yolanda Adams, Chanticleer, Kirk Whalum, Hank Jones, Little Richard, Cassietta George, John Fahey, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, Barbara Hendricks, and James Cleveland.

Lyrics[edit]

Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart, in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart, in my heart.

Lord, I want to be more loving in my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more loving in my heart, in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more loving in my heart, in my heart.

Lord, I want to be more holy in my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more holy in my heart, in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be more holy in my heart, in my heart.

Lord, I want to be like Jesus in my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be like Jesus in my heart, in my heart.
In my heart, in my heart,
Lord, I want to be like Jesus in my heart, in my heart.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Albert Stoutamire (1972). Music of the Old South: Colony to Confederacy. Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-8386-7910-4. 
  2. ^ Fred Daniel Gealy; Austin Cole Lovelace; Carlton R. Young (1970). Companion to the Hymnal: A Handbook to the 1964 Methodist Hymnal. Abingdon Press. p. 274. ISBN 978-0-687-09259-8. 
  3. ^ Frederick Jerome Work (1907). Folk Songs of the American Negro. Work Brothers. p. 41. 

External links[edit]