Lord, Mr. Ford

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"Lord, Mr. Ford"
Single by Jerry Reed
from the album Lord, Mr. Ford
B-side Two-Timin'
Released May 14, 1973
Format 7"
Recorded January 9, 1973
Nashville, Tennessee
Genre Country
Length 3:17
Label RCA Records
Writer(s) Dick Feller
Producer(s) Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed
Jerry Reed singles chronology
"You Took All the Ramblin' Out of Me"
(1972)
"Lord, Mr. Ford"
(1973)
"The Uptown Poker Club"
(1973)

"Lord, Mr. Ford" is the title of a song written by Dick Feller and recorded by Jerry Reed. It was released in May 1973 as the only single from the album of the same name, Lord, Mr. Ford. The single was Jerry Reed's second of three No. 1's on the Billboard Hot Country Singles chart. "Lord, Mr. Ford" spent one week at the top and a total of 13 weeks inside the chart's top 40.[1]

Song background[edit]

"Lord, Mr. Ford" is a satire on the social, cultural and economic influence the automobile has had on the American public. The lyrics bemoan the fact that a seemingly simple invention to assist mankind has instead brought nothing but grief, become increasingly more complex and added to the increasing fast-paced demands of society. The refrain asks the question aloud to the late Henry Ford: "Lord, Mr. Ford, I just wish that you could see/ What your simple horseless carriage has become."

In an Allmusic review for the album bearing "Lord, Mr. Ford," Pemberton Roach terms the song "a semi-political song," with Reed's version an "appropriately crotchety considering the song's 'simple working man' theme.[2]

Referring to a substitution in the lyrics concerning the average American owning 1½ cars, ("Now the average American father and mother/Own one whole car and half another/And I bet that half a car is a trick to drive, don't you"), Roach alludes to the original lyrics using the word "bitch," instead of the word "trick" as in the final recorded version. Noted Roach: "(I)t's amusing to hear notorious bad boy Reed forced to substitute the word "trick" for the original version's 'bitch'."."[2]

Chart performance[edit]

Chart (1973) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 1
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 2
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks 25
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 68
Australian Kent Music Report 97

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). The Billboard Book Of Top 40 Country Hits: 1944–2006, Second edition. Record Research. p. 283. 
  2. ^ a b [1] Roach, Pemberton, Lord, Mr. Ford, album review at Allmusic. Accessed 04-29-2010
Preceded by
"You Were Always There" by Donna Fargo
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number one single

August 4, 1973
Succeeded by
"Trip to Heaven" by Freddie Hart and the Heartbeats