Lori Watson

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Lori Watson
Born Scotland
Genres Folk, traditional, celtic, Scottish
Occupation(s) Singer, instrumentalist, researcher, teacher
Labels ISLE Music Scotland
Website www.loriwatson.co.uk

Lori Watson is a fiddle player and folk singer who performs traditional and contemporary folk music. She is the first doctor of Artistic Research in Scottish Music.

Biography[edit]

Lori grew up in the Scottish Borders where she was a founder member of The Small Hall Band and played in the Clarty Cloot Ceilidh Band. She studied Scottish Music at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow and graduated in 2003. She is currently writing a PhD in Contemporary Innovation and Traditional Music in Scotland. She performs traditional, contemporary and original folk music and sings primarily in Scots and English. Family Background: From a musical Scots/Irish family, Lori’s great grandfather Peter Augustus Meechan was a popular fiddle player in Glasgow, her grandfather Alexander Watson played accordion and everyone in the family sang. Today, her father sings, plays guitar, bouzouki and mandolin and her mother sings and plays bodhran. Their small, independent record label, ISLE Music Scotland, owned and run by the family, issued the Borders Young Fiddles CD, a landmark in Scottish / Borders fiddle music and Lori’s debut in 2006 :Three. Lori’s brother Innes Watson, graduated from the RSAMD in 2006 and is building a career as a full-time musician with a growing reputation.

Awards[edit]

Bands[edit]

  • Lori Watson and Rule of Three
    • Lori Watson – Vocals and Fiddle
    • Innes Watson – Guitars, Harmony Vocals
    • John Somerville – Piano Accordion
    • Donald Hay – Percussion
    • Duncan Lyall - Double Bass

Discography[edit]

Borders Young Fiddles , by Borders Young Fiddles, Borders Traditional Series Vol. 3, ISLE Music Scotland, 2004.

:Three , by Lori Watson with Fiona Young, Innes Watson & Barry (Spad) Reid, ISLE Music Scotland, 2006.

No.1 Scottish, Traditional Music from the RSAMD, RSAMD, 2002, Greentrax, 2007.

Pleasure's Coin, by Lori Watson and Rule of Three, ISLE Music Scotland, 2009.

Borders Tunesmiths, by Borders Tunesmiths, Borders Traditions Series Vol. 6, 2009.

The Songs of Sandy Wright, by Various, Navigator Records, 2010.

The Rough Guide To Scottish Music, by Various, The Rough Guide, 2010.

Projects[edit]

Contemporary Innovation and Traditional Music in Scotland[edit]

Lori Watson completed doctoral studies at the RCS in Glasgow and St Andrews University in 2013. She investigated innovation and beyond-tune composition by Traditional musicians in Scotland including a substantial folio of new and experimental musical works. Her supervisors were: Dr. Stephen Broad, Dr. Liz Doherty, Dr. Stuart Eydmann and Prof. Raymond MacDonald.

[1]

James Hogg, A Life In Music.[edit]

A concert featuring the work and life of James Hogg in music, song, poetry and monologue co-written with Innes Watson and John Nicol, performed and recorded live at Both Sides of the Tweed music festival in Selkirk, 2005.

Teaching[edit]

Lori is a lecturer and examiner at the RCS including Contemporary Studies, Honours Projects, Scots Song and Principal Study Song Group. She leads the Tolbooth Traditional Music Project for young people and regularly teaches workshops at folk festivals like The Border Gaitherin and the Scots Fiddle Festival. Lori was a Senior Tutor at Glasgow Fiddle Workshop for 10 years and taught fiddle on the Folk and Traditional Music degree at Newcastle University for 6 years.

External links[edit]

References/articles[edit]

Broad, Stephen (2006) 'Practice-based Research at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama' in Konstnarlig forskning: Artiklar, Prjektrapporter & Reportage ed. Torbjorn Lind (Stockholm: Swedish Research Council, 2005), 17–25.

References[edit]

  1. ^ * 2006 'Practice-based Research at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama' in Konstnarlig forskning: Artiklar, Prjektrapporter & Reportage ed. Torbjorn Lind (Stockholm: Swedish Research Council, 2005), 17–25.