Los Conquistadores

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Los Conquistadors
Tag team
Members Numerous wrestlers have portrayed
Name(s) The Conquistadors
Conquistador #1 & #2
Los Conquistadores
Uno & Dos
Heights 6' 2" each
Combined
weight
N/A
Debut 1987
Disbanded Sporadic
Promotions WWE

Los Conquistadores was the name of a professional wrestling tag team in the World Wrestling Federation, with the team consisting of two masked wrestlers known as 1 (or Uno) and 2 (or Dos). The original team consisted of José Estrada (Sr.) and José Luis Rivera, but several other wrestlers made use of the gimmick in 2000 and 2003. The original costume was golden spandex bodysuits and golden masks, but later teams have varied it to blue and gold Japanese-style wrestling masks with elaborate shoulder pads while still using the name.

History[edit]

Original[edit]

The original Conquistadors were a masked foreign heel team consisting of José Estrada, Sr. and José Luis Rivera two Puerto Rican wrestlers (but billed as "from somewhere in Latin America") who were used mainly as enhancement talent. The Conquistadors won so few matches that it was considered an upset if they beat fellow jobber teams such as The Young Stallions.

The sole highlight of the Conquistadors' 1980s stint was their first and only pay-per-view appearance, as part of the 10-team (20 man) elimination match at the Survivor Series 1988. The Conquistadors and the Powers of Pain were the last two teams left in the ring. They were bit players in the double turn of The Powers of Pain and Demolition, which came about when Mr. Fuji attacked Demolition and joined forces with The Powers of Pain. Fuji pulled down a rope causing Smash to fall out of the ring, and thus Demolition, to be eliminated by count out. The Conquistadors remained standing in the ring for over five minutes. Meanwhile, firstly, a ringside argument between Fuji and his men degenerated into a fight with Fuji hitting Ax with his cane and subsequently being double-teamed and beaten up by Demolition. The champions then walked away in disgust. Finally the Powers of Pain stepped off the ring apron down to ringside, helped Fuji to get up and regain his composure, and guided him to their corner, whereupon they resumed the match. The Conquistadors lost when Mr. Fuji tripped up Uno and Barbarian hit him with a headbutt to win the match for The Powers of Pain.

The team spent the rest of 1988 and 1989 jobbing to established teams, except for a rare (and comical) victory over The Fabulous Rougeaus in Canada. In 1989, Conquistador #1 (Estrada) started to appear on his own as “The Conquistador” while #2 (Rivera) appeared only sporadically before both men left the WWF.

Revivals[edit]

2000[edit]

During 2000, the Hardy Boyz and Edge and Christian feuded, competing in the first-ever Tables, Ladders, and Chairs match (TLC) match. The Hardy Boyz captured the WWF Tag Team Championship in a steel cage match at Unforgiven. The next day they were scheduled for a Ladder match for the tag belts. Commissioner Mick Foley stipluated that if Edge and Christian lost, they would not get another title shot for the duration of the Hardys' title reign. Edge and Christian lost the match.

When Los Conquistadors made their return weeks later, they didn't look physically like Rivera and Estrada but instead looked and acted more like Edge and Christian, a suspicion that was boosted by Los Conquistadors immediately targeting the Hardy Boyz in the hopes of getting a shot at the titles. They later won a tag-team battle royal on SmackDown! to earn a title shot. After the match, a vignette showed Los Conquistadors being congratulated backstage by Edge and Christian. Since they were seen with Los Conquistadors, Edge and Christian claimed there was no way they could be Los Conquistadors.

Their title shot came at No Mercy, where they defeated the Hardys using tactics similar to those employed by Edge and Christian, especially when Conquistador Dos hit the Unprettier (Christian's finisher) for the win.[1] Backstage, Edge and Christian (who looked like they just came out of the showers) politely challenged Los Conquistadors for a title shot the next night. On "Raw", Edge looked confident as he made his way to the ring. Edge found Christian backstage seemingly put through a table. So, Edge was left to fight Los Conquistadors by himself.[1] Edge was shocked when Los Conquistadors quickly defeated him. When Christian showed up at ringside, Los Conquistadors unmasked themselves, revealing themselves to be Matt Hardy and Jeff Hardy. They explained that they had attacked Edge and Christian's hired goons (Christopher Daniels and Aaron Aguilera, who had doubled for Los Conquistadors in backstage segments) backstage and stole the costumes.[1]

As Edge and Christian complained, it was declared that Edge and Christian's title victory the previous night was official.[1] At the same time, because the Hardy Boyz had just defeated the champions, commissioner Mick Foley ruled they were now the tag team champions.[1] After being outsmarted by the Hardy Boyz, Edge and Christian gave up the golden costumes of Los Conquistadors. Due to the stipulations, the title reign of the Hardys that Edge and Christian were banned from challenging had ended when "Los Conquistadors" had won so Edge and Christian could wrestle for the titles again without disguises. The Los Conquistadors costumes of Edge and Christian are available as alternative outfits in the video game WWE SmackDown vs. Raw 2011.

2003[edit]

On the July 17, 2003 edition of SmackDown! Rob Conway and Eugene assumed the roles of Los Conquistadors in a match in which they were defeated by Rey Mysterio and Billy Kidman. Unlike previous versions of Los Conquistadors, Conway and Eugene wore blue and gold masks with exposed mouths, similar to the mask of Último Dragón, along with blue shoulder pads.

On July 27, 2003, another set of Conquistadors participated in the APA Invitational Barroom Brawl Match at Vengeance, where they were soundly beaten up by the APA. In this case, the men under the masks were Rob Conway and Johnny Jeter, who were both working in Ohio Valley Wrestling at the time.

In wrestling[edit]

Championships[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Hardy, Jeff; Hardy, Matt, and Krugman,y3d Michael (2003). The Hardy Boyz: Exist 2 Inspire. WWE Books. p. 160. ISBN 978-0-7368-2142-1. 
  2. ^ http://nepwhof.weebly.com/class-of-2014.html