Lost Horizon (video game)

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Lost Horizon
Lost Horizon (PC video game) boxart.jpg
Developer(s) Animation Arts
Publisher(s) Deep Silver
Platform(s) Microsoft Windows
Release date(s) United Kingdom: September 17, 2010
Download: August 2010
Genre(s) Adventure
Mode(s) Single-player

Lost Horizon is a 2010 point-and-click adventure game for the PC. It was developed by Animation Arts, and was published by Deep Silver.[1]

On October 8, 2013, Animation Arts announced that a sequel for Lost Horizon is in development. Lost Horizon 2 will take place 20 years after the events of the first game.[2]

Plot[edit]

Set in 1936, the Third Reich's soldiers are traveling the world over, searching for occult weapons to help with plans for further conquests – and for a key artifact to unlock the mythical Shambala. When Fenton Paddock, a former British soldier and hapless smuggler, is asked to look for his friend Richard, who went missing in Tibet, he has no idea that this search will lead him across three continents to a secret that could turn the whole world upside down.

After touring Hong Kong, Paddock boards his plane to Tibet. Over Tibet, his plane is hit by a German fighter plane, after which he is forced to make an emergency landing. After finding out that the Germans run an operation of research in the area, he finally reaches a monastery in the Khembalung valley. From there, he escapes the German expedition team, and heads to Marrakesh in Morocco under French colonial rule, where he has to meet a British professor who owns an artifact and tells him that the Tibet monastery in the Khembalung is most probably the entrance into Shambala. The professor is killed by German agents, and Paddock follows them all the way to Berlin, site of the 1936 Olympic Games. He then infiltrates a museum, finding out that the Piri Reis map he needs to find out the location of a second key to Shambala is actually stored in Wewelsburg castle in Germany. Paddock infiltrates the castle, where he combines the artifact that the professor gave him and the Piri Reis map, finding out that the second key is located in the Gujarat area of India. He finds the key at an old temple submerged under water. After that, Paddock realizes that Shambala holds such power that he must destroy the key to prevent the Germans from reaching it.

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate scores
Aggregator Score
GameRankings 81.10%[3]
Metacritic 77/100[4]

Lost Horizon received generally favorable reviews from critics. On GameRankings it currently scores 81.10% based on 10 reviews,[3] and on Metacritic 77/100 based on 24 reviews.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wenske, Giancarlo (September 28, 2009). "PREVIEW: Lost Horizon". Adventure Gamers. Archived from the original on 6 March 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Fenton Paddock kehrt zurück!" (in German). Animation Arts. October 8, 2013. Retrieved April 1, 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "Lost Horizon for PC". GameRankings. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Lost Horizon for PC Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 

External links[edit]