Lost in the Trees

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Lost in the Trees
Lost in the Trees at Hillside Festival.jpg
Lost in the Trees performing at the 2011 Hillside Festival
Background information
Origin Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Genres Folk, indie, orchestral
Years active 2007–present
Labels Anti, Trekky
Website Official website
Members Ari Picker
Emma Nadeau
Joah Tunnell
Mark Daumen
Peter Lewis
Past members Will Hackney
Scott Carle
Leah Gibson
Jenavieve Varga
Andrew Anagnost

Lost in the Trees is an American orchestral folk pop band from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The current line up consists of Ari Picker (writer/vocals), Emma Nadeau (french horn/vocals), Drew Anagnost (cello), Jenavieve Varga (violin), and Mark Daumen (tuba). Lead singer Ari Picker cites diverse influence such as Beethoven, Radiohead, Vivaldi, Neutral Milk Hotel, Saint-Saëns, and OutKast, among others.[1]

History[edit]

Lost in the Trees formed in 2007 when lead singer/guitarist Ari Picker, a native of Chapel Hill, assembled a group of musicians to record the EP Time Taunts Me on Trekky Records.[2] Picker had previously been a member of The B-Sides. After studying at Berklee College of Music, he decided to attempt a more orchestral effort. Following the release of Time Taunts Me, Picker moved back to North Carolina and assembled a band drawn from the University of North Carolina's orchestral program and the pool of players connected with Trekky Records.[3]

All Alone in an Empty House and signing to ANTI-Records[edit]

All Alone in an Empty House was originally released on Trekky Records in 2008.[4] The band signed to ANTI-Records on March 1, 2010[5] and their new label re-released the album on August 10 that year.[5]

Reviewing the record, Bob Boilen of NPR said, "Take a pinch of the brilliance found in classical music and mix it with [Picker's] own. Lost in the Trees is orchestral folk where the "orchestral" part isn't an afterthought. This is mighty potent stuff."[6] Keelan H. from Sputnik Music said, "Right from the swelling strings of six-minute opener “Empty House”, it’s clear that Lost in the Trees don’t take their “orchestral folk” label lightly."[7]

Time Taunts Me was reissued by Trekky Records on February 4, 2011 with the addition of previously unreleased tracks.[8]

A Church That Fits Our Needs[edit]

Emma Nadeau playing accordion at SXSW Music Festival.

On March 20, 2012, ANTI-Records released A Church That Fits Our Needs, Lost in the Trees' second record with the label.[9] Picker based the album largely on his mother's suicide in 2008, stating that "I wanted to give my mother a space to become all the things I think she deserved to be and wanted to be, and all the beautiful things in her that didn't quite shine while she was alive."[10]

Rolling Stone said of the album, "Ari Picker tries to make sense of his mother's suicide against a backdrop of rich orchestration, piled generously atop a base of delicate acoustic folk like heaping spoonfuls of vanilla frosting."[11] PopMatters said "A Church That Fits Our Needs bursts with the same melodic interplay that makes later Radiohead extraordinary."[12]

A Church That Fits Our Needs peaked at No. 9 on Billboard's Heatseeker's Albums.[2]

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Horowitz, Steven. "Lost in the Trees Interview: SXSW 2010". spinner.com. Spinner. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  2. ^ a b Ruhlmann, William. "Lost in the Trees". Billboard.com. All Music Guide. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  3. ^ "Lost in the Trees," Allmusic. Retrieved 11 April 2013.
  4. ^ "Lost in the Trees". Discography. Trekky Records. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  5. ^ a b "Lost in the Trees Signs With ANTI Records". anti.com. Anti- Records. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  6. ^ Boilen, Bob. "First Listen: Lost In The Trees, 'All Alone In An Empty House'". NPR Music. NPR. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  7. ^ H., Keelan. "Lost In The Trees All Alone In An Empty House". Music Reviews. Sputnik Music. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  8. ^ Golden, Grant. "Album Review: "Time Taunts Me" by Lost in the Trees". The Bottom String. The Bottom String. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  9. ^ "Lost In The Trees A Church That Fits Our Needs". Lost in the Trees Discography. ANTI-Records. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  10. ^ STAFF, NPR. "Lost In The Trees: A Golden Memorial Of Orchestral Folk". NPR Music. NPR. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  11. ^ Keyes, J. Edward. "Lost in the Trees". Rolling Stone Reviews. Rolling Stone. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  12. ^ Majorins, Philip. "Lost in the Trees: A Church That Fits Our Needs". Music Reviews. PopMatters. Retrieved 4/10/12.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

External links[edit]