Louis Hyman

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Louis Hyman (born 1977) is an American writer and economic historian.

Education[edit]

After growing up in Baltimore, Maryland, where he attended McDonogh School, Hyman attended Columbia University in New York City. He graduated with a BA in history and mathematics.

Hyman was a 1999–2000 Fulbright Fellow at the University of Toronto, during which time he studied Canadian history.[1]

In 2007, Hyman earned a PhD in American history from Harvard University.

Career[edit]

Hyman revised his doctoral dissertation into a book during a fellowship at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The result, titled Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink, was published by Princeton University Press in 2011.[2] Choice named it one of the top 25 "Outstanding Academic Titles" for 2011.[3]

Hyman has served as a consultant for global management consulting firm McKinsey & Company.[4] His writings have appeared in such publications as Enterprise & Society,[5] Reviews in American History,[6] CNBC,[7] Wilson Quarterly,[8] and The New York Times.[4][9]

His second book, Borrow: The American Way of Debt, was published in 2012.[10]

After spending time as a lecturer at Harvard,[11] Hyman now works at Cornell University's School of Industrial & Labor Relations, where he is an assistant professor in the Labor Relations, Law, and History department.[12] He continues to conduct research on the history of American capitalism.

Personal life[edit]

Hyman currently resides in upstate New York with his wife, the novelist Katherine Howe.[4]

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink (2011)
  • Borrow: The American Way of Debt (2012)

Articles[edit]

Chapters[edit]

  • "American Debt, Global Capital." The Shock of the Global. Harvard University Press. (2010)
  • "Rethinking the Corporation." What's Good for Business: Business in Postwar: Business and Politics in Postwar America. Oxford University Press. (2012)

References[edit]

External links[edit]