Louis J. Brann

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Louis Jefferson Brann
56th Governor of Maine
In office
January 4, 1933 – January 6, 1937
Preceded by William T. Gardiner
Succeeded by Lewis O. Barrows
Personal details
Born July 6, 1876
Madison, Maine
Died February 3, 1948(1948-02-03) (aged 71)
Political party Democratic
Alma mater University of Maine

Louis Jefferson Brann (6 July 1876 – 3 February 1948) was an American lawyer and political figure. He was the 56th Governor of Maine.

Early life[edit]

Brann was born in Madison, Maine to Charles M. Brann and Nancy Lancaster Brann. He attended schools in Gardiner, Maine. He graduated from the University of Maine in 1898, after which he studied Law. He was admitted to the bar in 1902 and began his law practice at that time. In the late 1920s he formed[1] (with Peter A. Isaacson) Brann & Isaacson, a law firm which is still in existence (2010).

On 8 March, 1902 Brann married Martha Cobb.[citation needed]

Brann participated widely in local government activity; he was the Androscoggin County Register of Probate (1909-1913); a municipal judge (1913-1915); mayor of Lewiston, Maine (1915-1917 and 1922-1925); member of Maine state house of representatives from Androscoggin County (1919-1920); delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine (1924, 1936, 1940 and 1944). He also served a term as chairman of the Maine Democratic Party.

Governor of Maine[edit]

Brann was nominated by the Democratic Party for the governorship of Maine in 1932, and won the election. He was also successful in his re-election bid in 1934. During his administration, a constitutional amendment was sanctioned that secured two million dollars in state bonds for emergency relief. He did not seek re-election in 1936, instead running for the US Senate that year. He was unsuccessful in that campaign, and he left the Governor's office on 6 January 1937. He ran for the governorship again in 1938, but was unsuccessful.

Later years[edit]

Brann ran for the United States Senate in 1936. He was the candidate of the Democratic Party. However, the Republican candidate, Wallace H. White, Jr. won the election. He strove to regain the Governor's seat in 1938, but was unsuccessful. Brann then ran for the other Maine Senate seat in 1940, against Republican Owen Brewster, but was again unsuccessful.

Brann was a candidate for Maine's 1st District to the US House of Representatives in 1942, but lost to the Republican candidate.[citation needed]

Brann was a member of the Church of Christ, Scientist, and held membership in Beta Theta Pi, Knights of Pythias, Elks, National Grange, and Lions Club.[citation needed]

Brann died on 3 February 1948. He was buried at Riverside Cemetery in Lewiston.

References[edit]

  • Sobel, Robert and John Raimo. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978. Greenwood Press, 1988. ISBN 0-313-28093-2