Louis Marriott

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Louis Marriott
Born (1935-05-22) 22 May 1935 (age 79)
Saint Andrew, Jamaica
Nationality Jamaican
Occupation Actor, director, writer, broadcaster

Louis Marriott (born 22 May 1935) is a Jamaican actor/director/writer/broadcaster,[1] the Executive Officer of the Michael Manley Foundation, and member of the Performing Right Society,[2] Jamaica Federation of Musicians, and founding member of the Jamaica Association of Dramatic Artists.[3][4]

Marriott was born on the Old Pound Road, Saint Andrew, Jamaica, son of the late Egbert Marriott, builder, and the late Edna Irene Thompson-Marriott. He was educated at Jamaica College.

Career[edit]

  • Government Public Relations Officer - late 1950s[5]
  • Editor Public Opinion 1960-62[6]
  • Assistant Public Relations Officer – Ninth Central American and Caribbean Games (Kingston) 1962
  • Press Officer – 1st Anniversary Jamaica Independence Festival 1963
  • Deputy Editor of Publications – Commonwealth Parliamentary Association (C.P.A.) General Council (London) 1965-70 (Lectured widely in Britain on Commonwealth and Caribbean affairs 1965-72. Was Consultant/Advisor for several C.P.A. conferences in Caribbean and West Africa 1967-70)
  • BBC Radio Writer and Producer 1970-71[7][8]
  • Director Jamaica Independence Festival (London) 1972
  • Press Secretary to Prime Minister of Jamaica 1973 and 1979-80[9]
  • Assistant Director – National Literacy Programme Communications 1973-74
  • Director-General Information Incorporated 1974-76
  • Chief Organizer – Food and Drink '75 Exhibition (National Arena) July 1975
  • Director Publications and Advertising Agency for Public Information 1976-79
  • Freelance writer 1980–present - for CFNI, PAHO, WHO, Jamaica Gleaner, among several national and international bodies, and writer / director / producer of several stage productions
  • Executive Officer - Michael Manley Foundation, 2000–present[10]

Theatre[edit]

Marriott has written and directed for stage, and acted[11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]

  • Public Mischief (1957)
  • The Shepherd (1960)
  • Phineas McUmbridge (1961)
  • The Baiting of Reuben (1963)
  • A Pack of Jokers (1978)[19]
  • More Jokers (1980)
  • The New Jokers (1981)[19]
  • Playboy (1981)[20][21]
  • Pressure (1982)[22]
  • Office Chase (1982)[22]
  • How to Make Money (1983)
  • Singer Man (1984)
  • Bedward (1984, 2004) (reprisal of The Shepherd)[23][24][25][26]
  • Women (1984)
  • Lovey (1985)
  • Over the Years (1985, 2010)[27][28]
  • One Stop Driver (1988) (co-written with Alvin Campbell)
  • Last of the Jokers (1988) (co-written with Alvin Campbell, Lavinia Marriott and Karen Marriott)
  • The Adventure of Charlie Greenhorne (1991)
  • Funny Biz Niz (1992)
  • Life in Jamaica (1998)[19]
  • Rosie (1999)
  • The Year 2000 (2000)

Marriott has written several books[22] including:

  • Gold Rush – Jamaican Style – Jamaica in World Athletics 1948–92 (1992) (co-written with Alvin Campbell)
  • Who's Who and What's What in Jamaican Arts and Entertainment (1995)[29][30]

Journalism[edit]

Marriott has authored syndicated articles appearing in some 200 English-Language newspapers and magazines throughout the world. He has been a regular guest writer in several Jamaican newspaper publications.[31][32] He has written and produced numerous radio and television plays and documentary broadcast programmes and films in both Jamaica and Britain. He wrote "The University of Brixton"[7] radio drama series for BBC English Radio 1970-71. He has written several public education radio series for the CFNI (Caribbean Food and Nutrition Institute) during his freelance years.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Discover Jamaica
  2. ^ The Original Soundtrack From "Countryman".
  3. ^ "Theatre groups to form umbrella association", Jamaica Gleaner.
  4. ^ JADA - Big Plans for the Future.
  5. ^ "Nostalgia kept Hartley Neita's adrenaline flowing".
  6. ^ 'Federation a Buyers' Syndicate', Public Opinion.
  7. ^ a b Louis Marriott, "The Jamaican language issue - Part 1", Jamaica Gleaner, 17 September 2006.
  8. ^ "Race and the press".
  9. ^ Howard Campbell, "1970'S FLASHBACK - The media and Michael Manley", Jamaica Gleaner, 30 May 2006.
  10. ^ Howard Campbell, "'Joshua' and the rod of correction", Jamaica Gleaner, 18 July 2007.
  11. ^ Jamaica's soul and spirit.
  12. ^ Caribbean Playwrights.
  13. ^ "One to One - An interview with Jamaican playwright and actor Louis Marriott".
  14. ^ A History of African American Theatre.
  15. ^ 40 Years of Jamaica's Independence: Outstanding Playwrights, Outstanding Producers.
  16. ^ Andrew Clunis, "Charles Hyatt at 70", The Jamaica Gleaner.
  17. ^ PJ gets dramatic for PNP conference
  18. ^ Michael Reckord, "Playwrights in waiting", Jamaica Gleaner, 26 January 2003.
  19. ^ a b c Tanya Batson-Savage, "Laughter soothes bitter pills", Jamaica Gleaner, 20 June 2004.
  20. ^ 'Love Games' takes Centerstage
  21. ^ FRIENDS ON FRIENDS: Fae Ellington - a multi-talented Jamaican.
  22. ^ a b c Google Books.
  23. ^ The Return of Bedward.
  24. ^ BEDWARD A theatrical feast comes to an end.
  25. ^ On Bedward: Ahead of their time.
  26. ^ "We need an advancement of literacy", Jamaica Gleaner, 29 March 2004.
  27. ^ "Marriott show to honour icons", The Gleaner.
  28. ^ Year-long celebration for Louis Marriott's 75th birthday.
  29. ^ Who's Who.
  30. ^ Tanya Batson-Savage, "J'can theatre is no play thing", Jamaica Gleaner, 19 October 2003.
  31. ^ "Louis Marriott's columns delightful", Jamaica Gleaner.
  32. ^ Marriott speaks on linguistics.