List of minor state highways in Louisiana (District 02)

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The following is a list of state highways in southeastern Louisiana located in District 02, as defined by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (La DOTD), that are less than 2.0 miles (3.2 km) in length. District 02 contains the parishes of Jefferson, Lafourche, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, and Terrebonne.

Many of these short routes serve as connectors between main highways, often between a current and former alignment of a state or U.S. highway route. Others are either pieces of former highway alignments themselves or are left-over sections of state-maintained roads from the original state highway system in use from 1921 to 1955. Some are simply state-maintained bridges over waterways in the state or provide access to various La DOTD facilities.


Louisiana Highway 629[edit]

Louisiana Highway 629
Location: Killona
Length: 0.67 mi[1] (1.08 km)
Existed: 1955–1960s

Louisiana Highway 629 (LA 629) ran 0.67 miles (1.08 km) in a north–south direction along Killona Drive in Killona, St. Charles Parish.[1]

The route headed southwest from LA 18 (River Road), which runs along the Mississippi River, to a crossing of the Texas & Pacific Railroad (now the Union Pacific Railroad) tracks on Killona Drive. It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[1]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 629 was designated as State Route 659.[2] LA 629 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted sometime in the 1960s. Today a similar route, LA 3141 (Mary Plantation Road), parallels and extends beyond Killona Drive, connecting LA 18 with LA 3127, a bypass of LA 18 that was constructed in 1970s.[4]

The entire highway was in Killona, St. Charles Parish.

Mile[1] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 Begin state maintenance at Texas & Pacific Railroad crossing Southern terminus
0.67 1.08 LA 18 (River Road) – Donaldsonville, Luling Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 630[edit]

Louisiana Highway 630
Location: Hahnville
Length: 0.94 mi[5] (1.51 km)
Existed: 1955–c. 1957

Louisiana Highway 630 (LA 630) ran 0.94 miles (1.51 km) in a west–east direction along Courthouse Lane in Hahnville, St. Charles Parish.[5]

The route headed southwest from LA 18 (River Road), which runs along the Mississippi River, made a zigzag around the St. Charles Parish courthouse, and continued to the Texas & Pacific Railroad (now the Union Pacific Railroad) tracks. It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[5]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 630 was designated as State Route 660.[2] LA 630 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted by 1958.[6] Today a similar route, LA 3160 (Home Place), parallels and extends beyond Courthouse Lane, connecting LA 18 with LA 3127, a bypass of LA 18 that was constructed in the 1970s.[4]

The entire highway was in Hahnville, St. Charles Parish.

Mile[5] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 Begin state maintenance at Texas & Pacific Railroad tracks Western terminus
0.94 1.51 LA 18 (River Road) – Donaldsonville, Luling Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 634[edit]

Louisiana Highway 634
Location: Des Allemands
Length: 0.25 mi[7] (0.40 km)
Existed: 1955–c. 1960s

Louisiana Highway 634 (LA 634) ran 0.25 miles (0.40 km) in a west–east direction along J.B. Green Road in Des Allemands, St. Charles Parish.[7]

The route connected US 90 and its former alignment, LA 631 (Old Spanish Trail). It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[7]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 634 was designated as State Route C-1522.[2] LA 634 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted sometime in the 1960s. However, a similar connector road to the north, LA 635 (formerly State Route C-1520), remains.[4][6]

The entire highway was in Des Allemands, St. Charles Parish.

Mile[7] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 LA 631 (Old Spanish Trail) – Des Allemands, Paradis Western terminus
0.25 0.40 US 90 – New Orleans, Houma Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 651[edit]

Louisiana Highway 651
Location: Raceland
Length: 1.3 mi (2.1 km)
Existed: 1955–1975

Louisiana Highway 651 (LA 651) ran 1.3 miles (2.1 km) in a north–south direction along Bowie Road in Raceland, Lafourche Parish.

The route began at LA 308, which runs along Bayou Lafourche, and proceeded to a point on the Texas & New Orleans Railroad line (now the BNSF/Union Pacific Railroad) where the community of Bowie was once located. It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length. Now a ghost town, Bowie once thrived around a lumber mill served by the rail line north of Raceland in the early 20th Century.[8]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 651 was designated as State Route 891.[9] LA 651 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted from the state highway system in 1975.

The entire highway was in Lafourche Parish.

Location Mile km Destinations Notes
Raceland 0.0 0.0 LA 308 – Thibodaux, Lockport Southern terminus
Bowie 1.3 2.1 End state maintenance near the Texas & New Orleans Railroad crossing Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 656[edit]

Louisiana Highway 656
Location: Lafourche Parish
Length: 1.5 mi (2.4 km)
Existed: 1955–1993

Louisiana Highway 656 (LA 656) ran 1.5 miles (2.4 km) in a west–east direction along Lake Long Drive near the LafourcheTerrebonne Parish line northeast of Houma.[10]

The route proceeded eastward from an intersection with LA 316 (Bayou Blue Road) along the remains of Lake Long Bayou to a dead end west of the Company Canal and Lake Long. It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[10]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 656 was designated as State Route C-1798.[9] LA 656 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted in 1993.

The entire highway was in Lafourche Parish.

Location Mile[10] km Destinations Notes
  0.0 0.0 LA 316 (Bayou Blue Road) – Houma, Bourg Western terminus
  1.5 2.4 End state maintenance west of Company Canal Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 658[edit]

Louisiana Highway 658
Location: Schriever
Length: 0.69 mi (1.11 km)
Existed: 1955–1973

Louisiana Highway 658 (LA 658) ran 0.69 miles (1.11 km) in a west–east direction between two points along LA 20 in Schriever, Terrebonne Parish.

The route proceeded north from LA 20 along North Main Project Road (Parish Road 29), immediately crossing the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks (now the BNSF/Union Pacific Railroad). LA 658 then turned east onto Broadway Avenue, running parallel with the rail line, and continued to a point on the bypassed portion of LA 20 now known as Old Schriever Highway. It was an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 658 was designated as State Route C-1982.[11] LA 658 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering[3] and deleted in 1973. LA 20 had been realigned onto a new railroad overpass about five years earlier, eliminating the at-grade crossing with the rail line and the direct connection between the two highways.[12][13]

The entire highway was in Schriever, Terrebonne Parish.

Mile km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 LA 20 – Thibodaux, Morgan City Western terminus
0.69 1.11 LA 20 – Thibodaux, Morgan City Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 1245[edit]

Louisiana Highway 1245
Location: Toca
Length: 0.42 mi[14] (0.68 km)
Existed: 2002–present

Louisiana Highway 1245 (LA 1245) runs 0.42 miles (0.68 km) along Leon Road in Toca, St. Bernard Parish.[14]

The route begins at LA 300 (Bayou Road) east of Poydras and Sebastopol and proceeds north to an intersection with LA 46. It is an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[14][15]

LA 1245 was constructed as a new addition to the state highway system in 2002. It was designed to provide truck traffic from the industrial plants in Toca with a safer connection to LA 46 than the narrow and winding LA 300.[16]

The entire highway is in Toca, St. Bernard Parish.

Mile[14] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 LA 300 (Bayou Road) Southern terminus
0.42 0.68 LA 46 – Chalmette, Yscloskey Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 1253[edit]

Louisiana Highway 1253
Location: New Orleans
Length: 0.54 mi[17] (0.87 km)
Existed: 2002–present

Louisiana Highway 1253 (LA 1253) runs 0.54 miles (0.87 km) along Morrison Road in New Orleans (Orleans Parish).[17]

The route begins at Downman Road, a local road, between US 90 (Chef Menteur Highway) and LA 47 (Hayne Boulevard) and proceeds eastward to an interchange with I-10 at Exit 241. It is a divided, four-lane highway for its entire length and is unsigned.[17]

LA 1253 is a vestige of the original plans for the Eastern Expressway, incorporated into the route for I-10 by the time of its construction in the 1960s, which would have connected Morrison Road with North Claiborne Avenue via an expressway in the median of Elysian Fields Avenue.[18] In the pre-1955 state highway system, the proposed route was given the temporary designation of State Route C-2200, changed to LA 3021 in the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering.[19] The disconnected Elysian Fields Avenue and Morrison Road segments were ultimately left out of the expressway plans and, though never connected, both retained the LA 3021 designation until the latter segment was given its own number in 2002.[20]

The entire highway is in New Orleans, Orleans Parish.

Mile[17] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 Downman Road Western terminus
0.54 0.87 I-10 – Baton Rouge, Slidell Eastern terminus; Exit 241 on I-10
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 3011[edit]

Louisiana Highway 3011
Location: Dulac
Length: 1.5 mi[21] (2.4 km)
Existed: 1955–present

Louisiana Highway 3011 (LA 3011) runs 1.5 miles (2.4 km) in a north–south direction along Grand Caillou Road in Dulac, Terrebonne Parish.[21]

The route begins at a point where Grand Caillou Road transitions from parish to state maintenance and proceeds northeast along the east bank of Bayou Caillou. It then turns to the east and terminates at LA 57 (Bayou Sale Road). It is an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length. LA 57 continues south toward Cocodrie and also straight ahead and to the north across Bayou Dulac toward Houma.[21]

LA 3011 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering,[22][23] and its route has remained the same to the present day.[23][24]

The entire highway is in Dulac, Terrebonne Parish.

Mile[21] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 PR-63 (Grand Caillou Road) Southern terminus
1.5 2.4 LA 57 (Bayou Sale Road) – Houma, Cocodrie Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 3018[edit]

Louisiana Highway 3018
Location: Harvey
Length: 0.69 mi[25] (1.11 km)
Existed: 1955–present

Louisiana Highway 3018 (LA 3018) runs 0.69 miles (1.11 km) along Destrehan Avenue in Harvey, Jefferson Parish.[25]

The route begins at an intersection with the US 90 Business (Westbank Expressway) service roads below the high-level Harvey Canal bridge and heads north, running west of and parallel to the canal, to LA 18 (4th Street). LA 3018 serves the La DOTD Harvey Tunnel Maintenance Yard and is an undivided, two-lane highway for its entire length.[25]

In the pre-1955 state highway system, LA 3018 was designated as State Route C-2052.[26] LA 3018 was created with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering, and until the 2000s, its route extended 1.0 mile (1.6 km) further south on Destrehan Avenue to Patriot Street.[27][28]

The entire highway is in Harvey, Jefferson Parish.

Mile[25] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00
US 90 Bus. (West Bank Expressway)
Southern terminus; Indirect access to US 90 Business via service roads
0.69 1.11 LA 18 (4th Street) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 3019[edit]

Louisiana Highway 3019
Location: New Orleans
Length: 0.53 mi[29] (0.85 km)
Existed: 1955–present

Louisiana Highway 3019 (LA 3019) runs 0.53 miles (0.85 km) in a west–east direction primarily along Veterans Highway in New Orleans (Orleans Parish).[29]

The route begins on the east side of the 17th Street Canal bridge at the Jefferson–Orleans parish line and proceeds east along Veterans Highway, the continuation of Veterans Memorial Boulevard in New Orleans. Eastbound traffic turns south onto Pontchartrain Boulevard and immediately enters an interchange with I-10 and I-610. Westbound traffic utilizes parallel West End Boulevard. LA 3019 is a divided, six-lane highway on Veterans Highway and a divided, four-lane highway on Pontchartrain and West End Boulevards.[29]

LA 3019 is a vestige of the original plans for the Pontchartrain Expressway and its connection to Veterans Highway, which at the time ended just west of the parish line in Metairie. In the pre-1955 state highway system, the planned Pontchartrain Expressway, Greater New Orleans Bridge (now known as the Crescent City Connection), and Westbank Expressway were given the collective designation of State Route C-2200. This became LA 3019 with the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering,[19] and the majority of the route was later incorporated into I-10 and US 90 Business. The remaining segment connecting Veterans Memorial Boulevard in Metairie with the I-10/I-610 interchange retains the LA 3019 designation.[20]


Parish Location Mile[29] km Destinations Notes
JeffersonOrleans line MetairieNew Orleans line 0.00 0.00 Begin state maintenance on east side of 17th Street Canal bridge Western terminus
Orleans New Orleans 0.53 0.85 I-610 east – Slidell
I-10 – Baton Rouge, New Orleans Business District
Eastern terminus; Exit 1B on I-610 (no westbound exit);
Exit 231B on I-10 (eastbound exit is via I-610)
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 3021[edit]

Louisiana Highway 3021
Location: New Orleans
Length: 1.8 mi[30] (2.9 km)
Existed: 1955–present

Louisiana Highway 3021 (LA 3021) runs 1.8 miles (2.9 km) in a north–south direction along Elysian Fields Avenue in New Orleans (Orleans Parish).[30]

The route begins at North Claiborne Avenue, a junction with LA 39 and LA 46, and proceeds north along Elysian Fields Avenue. LA 3021 engages in interchanges with both I-10 and I-610, passing over the Norfolk Southern Railway (NS) tracks in between, before ending at US 90 (Gentilly Boulevard). It is a six-lane, divided highway for its entire length.[30]

LA 3021 is a vestige of the original plans for the Eastern Expressway, incorporated into the route for I-10 by the time of its construction in the 1960s, which would have connected Eastern New Orleans with North Claiborne Avenue via an expressway in the median of Elysian Fields Avenue.[18] In the pre-1955 state highway system, the proposed route was given the temporary designation of State Route C-2200, changed to LA 3021 in the 1955 Louisiana Highway renumbering.[19] The Elysian Fields Avenue segment, as well as a segment of Morrison Road that is now LA 1253, were ultimately left out of the expressway plans. Though never connected, both retained the LA 3021 designation until the latter segment was given its own number in 2002.[20]

The entire highway is in New Orleans, Orleans Parish.

Mile[30] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 LA 39 (North Claiborne Avenue) / LA 46 east (Elysian Fields Avenue) Southern terminus; western terminus of LA 46
0.5 0.8 I-10 – Baton Rouge, Slidell Exit 237 on I-10
1.2 1.9 I-610 – Baton Rouge, Slidell Exit 3 on I-610
1.8 2.9 US 90 (Gentilly Boulevard) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Louisiana Highway 3046[edit]

Louisiana Highway 3046
Location: JeffersonMetairie
Length: 1.0 mi[31] (1.6 km)
Existed: 1957–present

Louisiana Highway 3046 (LA 3046) runs 1.0 mile (1.6 km) in a north–south direction along Causeway Boulevard in Jefferson Parish.[31]

The route begins in Jefferson at a partial interchange with US 90 (Jefferson Highway). It proceeds north and becomes elevated to cross the New Orleans Public Belt (NOPB) and Canadian National Railway (CN) tracks and LA 3139 (Earhart Expressway). LA 3046 ends shortly afterward at a multi-level rotary interchange with US 61 (Airline Drive) in Metairie. It is a divided, four-lane highway for its entire length. North Causeway Boulevard continues ahead as a local road through Metairie to I-10 (Exit 228) and ultimately the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway.[31]

LA 3046 originated as part of the Greater New Orleans Expressway, a 1950s project to build a multilane highway in the center of what was Harlem Avenue (now Causeway Boulevard), connecting US 90 (Jefferson Highway), US 61 (Airline Highway), and Veterans Highway to the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway then under construction. Only the portion south of US 61 is state-maintained and carries the designation LA 3046. The route was opened to traffic in June 1957[32] and has remained the same to the present day,[27][33] although the US 90 intersection was altered in 1999 when the hook ramp was converted to carry one-way traffic.[34]

The entire highway is in Jefferson Parish.

Location Mile[31] km Destinations Notes
Jefferson 0.0 0.0 US 90 (Jefferson Highway) – New Orleans, Harahan Southern terminus; partial interchange
Metairie 1.0 1.6 US 61 (Airline Drive) – New Orleans, Kenner Northern terminus; multi-level rotary interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 629". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+629+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=30.0015319,-90.4869888+to:LA+629+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&ll=30.002443,-90.4846&spn=0.020478,0.042272&sll=30.00585,-90.482878&sspn=0.00128,0.002642&geocode=FVq7yQEdKDub-g%3BFXvJyQEdNEeb-ilZcabRWNAghjGS4P9GeRp8aA%3BFXvayQEdxVWb-g&mra=dme&mrsp=2&sz=19&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 5, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). St. Charles Parish (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1955 ed.).
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Act No. 40, House Bill No. 311". State-Times (Baton Rouge). June 18, 1955. pp. 3B–7B. 
  4. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (February 2012). St. Charles Parish (Map). Cartography by La DOTD Office of Multimodal Planning. http://www.dotd.la.gov/planning/mapping/Parish%20Maps/St_Charles.pdf. Retrieved September 27, 2013.
  5. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 630". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+630+(Western+Terminus)&daddr=29.9637013,-90.4073634+to:LA+630+(Eastern+Terminus)&hl=en&ll=29.961776,-90.410442&spn=0.020486,0.042272&sll=29.958365,-90.419294&sspn=0.002561,0.005284&geocode=FeIgyQEdflCc-g%3BFbU1yQEdPX6c-ilb0LeZhMUghjHRD5_NnTnwUA%3BFWc5yQEd8oSc-g&mra=dme&mrsp=0&sz=18&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 3, 2013.
  6. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). St. Charles Parish (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1958 ed.).
  7. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 634". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+634+(Western+Terminus)&daddr=29.8382629,-90.4519823+to:LA+634+(Eastern+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=29.838783,-90.452027&sspn=0.020512,0.042272&geocode=FadTxwEdXMSb-g%3BFbZLxwEd8s-b-imFt9fx1NwghjGmhjXi1sdgjw%3BFbhKxwEdrtGb-g&mra=dvme&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 3, 2013.
  8. ^ DeSantis, John (January 2, 2011). "Now pasture, Bowie once thrived as a lumber town". Houma Today. Retrieved April 5, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways (1953). Lafourche Parish (North Section) (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1955 ed.).
  10. ^ a b c Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 656". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+656+(Western+Terminus)&daddr=29.597765,-90.6047718+to:LA+656+(Eastern+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=29.595327,-90.605364&sspn=0.041123,0.084543&geocode=FS-gwwEdbkWZ-g%3BFUWgwwEdHXuZ-inPUlj9qQIhhjHpoN5sRm2s_w%3BFV2MwwEdW52Z-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=14&via=1&t=m&z=14. Retrieved April 5, 2013.
  11. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Terrebonne Parish (North Section) (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1955 ed.).
  12. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Terrebonne Parish (North Section) (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1958 ed.).
  13. ^ "State plans to construct overpasses". Morning Advocate (Baton Rouge). January 30, 1968. p. 13A. 
  14. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 1245". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+1245+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=29.8725053,-89.831485+to:LA+1245+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=29.872169,-89.830656&sspn=0.020505,0.042272&geocode=FU3DxwEd8UWl-g%3BFXnRxwEdw0el-ikHHgzYNxeeiDGU8-yviQSGyA%3BFd7axwEdDEal-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  15. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (February 2012) (PDF). St. Bernard Parish (West Section) (Map). Cartography by La DOTD Office of Multimodal Planning. http://www.dotd.la.gov/planning/mapping/Parish%20Maps/St_Bernard_West.pdf. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  16. ^ Bazile, Karen Turni (June 18, 2002). "Councilman wary of risk from new road: merging traffic may pose risk". The Times-Picayune (New Orleans). p. M1. 
  17. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 1253". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+1253+(Western+Terminus)&daddr=30.027242,-90.0201655+to:LA+1253+(Eastern+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=30.026448,-90.017939&sspn=0.020473,0.042272&geocode=FfwoygEdHVai-g%3BFeotygEdu2ai-in9lS5rtqkghjH3a9IDxxzyaw%3BFcQtygEdWHii-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  18. ^ a b "$100 million road plan to be heard at meeting". The Times-Picayune (New Orleans). September 25, 1953. p. 22. 
  19. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Highways (1955). Highway District No. 2 (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1958 ed.).
  20. ^ a b c Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (February 2012) (PDF). Orleans Parish (Map). Cartography by La DOTD Office of Multimodal Planning. http://www.dotd.la.gov/planning/mapping/Parish%20Maps/Orleans.pdf. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  21. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 3011". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+3011+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=29.3678988,-90.721273+to:LA+3011+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=29.365944,-90.719862&sspn=0.041216,0.084543&geocode=FUT3vwEd4pOX-g%3BFVoewAEdB7SX-im7Amz5-aghhjEft3mNbQflSA%3BFV0vwAEdcdOX-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=14&via=1&t=m&z=14. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  22. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Terrebonne Parish (Southeast Section) (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1955 ed.).
  23. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Terrebonne Parish (Southeast Section) (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1958 ed.).
  24. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (February 2012) (PDF). Terrebonne Parish (Southeast Section) (Map). Cartography by La DOTD Office of Multimodal Planning. http://www.dotd.la.gov/planning/mapping/Parish%20Maps/Terrebonne_SouthEast.pdf. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  25. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 3018". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+3018+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=29.9048025,-90.0835467+to:LA+3018+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&ll=29.903274,-90.082312&spn=0.020498,0.042272&sll=29.902828,-90.081453&sspn=0.020647,0.042272&geocode=FR8zyAEdPHmh-g%3BFaJPyAEdJm-h-ikhuvioIqQghjEY0bvI7uSx9g%3BFQdayAEdcmuh-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  26. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Jefferson Parish (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1955 ed.).
  27. ^ a b Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (February 2012). Jefferson Parish (North Section) (Map). Cartography by La DOTD Office of Multimodal Planning. http://www.dotd.la.gov/planning/mapping/Parish%20Maps/Jefferson_North.pdf. Retrieved September 27, 2013.
  28. ^ Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (2001). Jefferson Parish (Map). Cartography by DOTD Office of Planning and Programming.
  29. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 3019". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+3019+(Eastern+Terminus)&daddr=29.9999047,-90.1200257+to:LA+3019+(Western+Terminus)&hl=en&sll=29.999469,-90.117974&sspn=0.020478,0.042272&geocode=FS3AyQEd4_Og-g%3BFSDDyQEdp-Cg-ikLHbDXoq8ghjHEfr1ZbjlPaA%3BFb3DyQEd8dWg-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  30. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 3021". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+3021+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=29.9902838,-90.0583751+to:LA+3021+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&ll=29.989062,-90.054588&spn=0.040961,0.084543&sll=29.991385,-90.056541&sspn=0.01024,0.021136&geocode=FZJbyQEdxNah-g%3BFYudyQEdedGh-ikXjZEzvKgghjGvWuyYk2yNjw%3BFZvCyQEdkM6h-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=16&via=1&t=m&z=14. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  31. ^ a b c d Google Inc. "Overview Map of LA 3046". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=LA+3046+(Southern+Terminus)&daddr=29.9682069,-90.1565416+to:LA+3046+(Northern+Terminus)&hl=en&ll=29.969323,-90.15574&spn=0.020485,0.042272&sll=29.969323,-90.156169&sspn=0.020485,0.042272&geocode=FesyyQEdj0ug-g%3BFU5HyQEdA1Kg-ikdoIbVqLoghjE9vj60IIPloA%3BFe1gyQEd9FKg-g&mra=dpe&mrsp=1&sz=15&via=1&t=m&z=15. Retrieved April 10, 2013.
  32. ^ "Overpass event slated today". The Times-Picayune (New Orleans). June 6, 1957. p. 5. 
  33. ^ Louisiana Department of Highways (1951). Jefferson Parish (Map). Cartography by Department of Highways Traffic and Planning Section (January 1, 1958 ed.).
  34. ^ Lane, Cassandra (February 27, 1999). "Jeff ramp is getting the hook". The Times-Picayune (New Orleans). p. B1. 

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