Love in the Time of Science

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Love in the Time of Science
Studio album by Emilíana Torrini
Released 22 November 1999 (UK)[1]
24 October 2000 (United States)[1]
Recorded Neptune's Kitchen, UK
(addt. recording in Spain and Iceland)
Genre Electronica, trip hop
Length 38:54
Label One Little Indian
Producer Roland Orzabal & Alan Griffiths
Emilíana Torrini chronology
Merman
(1996)
Love in the Time of Science
(1999)
Rarities
(2000)
Alternative cover
Original cover
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[2]
PopMatters (positive)[3]

Love in the Time of Science is the fourth album by the Icelandic singer/songwriter Emilíana Torrini. It was her first album to be released internationally (her earlier albums being released only in her native Iceland).

The album was recorded and released in 1999, and was produced by Roland Orzabal and Alan Griffiths of Tears For Fears, who also wrote two tracks for the album. It was recorded and mixed at Orzabal's own studio, Neptune's Kitchen, with additional recording done in Spain and Iceland. Orzabal also played and performed backing vocals on the album.

Other collaborators included Eg White, Siggi Baldursson and Mark Abis.

The title of the album is a variation of the 1985 Gabriel García Márquez novel Love in the Time of Cholera.

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "To Be Free"   Emilíana Torrini, Eg White 3:25
2. "Wednesday's Child"   Roland Orzabal, Alan Griffiths 3:54
3. "Baby Blue"   Orzabal, Griffiths 4:05
4. "Dead Things"   Torrini, White 4:25
5. "Unemployed in Summertime"   Torrini, White 3:46
6. "Easy"   Torrini, White, Siggi Baldursson 3:22
7. "Fingertips"   Torrini, White, Baldursson 3:43
8. "Telepathy"   Baldursson, Johann G Johannsson 4:01
9. "Tuna Fish"   Torrini, White, Baldursson 3:13
10. "Summerbreeze"   Mark Abis 3:48
11. "Sea People"   Torrini, White 1:12

Singles[edit]

  • "Dead Things"
  • "Baby Blue"
  • "To Be Free" (UK #44)[4]
  • "Easy" (UK #63)[4]
  • "Unemployed in Summertime" (UK #63)[4]

References[edit]