Lovers (play)

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Lovers is a 1967 play written by Northern Irish playwright Brian Friel. Lovers is a play broken into two parts, Winners and Losers.

Winners[edit]

The first section of Lovers, titled "Winners" follows the story of two teenaged lovers, Joseph Michael Brennan & Margaret Mary Enright - more commonly known as Joe and Mag respectively - who are expecting a baby. However, the pregnancy occurs out of wedlock which, at the time of Lovers being written, was a major issue. Due to Mag falling pregnant with Joe's baby they are both asked to leave their schools out of disgrace for what they have done. In the play we find out that Joe's mother pleaded with the school to let Joe sit his exams, this is a very important theme as Joe - being the man - is expected to go, find work and provide for his family

The play is set atop hill with the simple premise of Mag and Joe revising for their exams. However, throughout the play they become distracted and talk on different subjects (much to Joe's annoyance) and through this we hear the further back story behind the characters.

The play ends with Mag and Joe finding a boat on the shore by a lake and deciding to take it out onto the lake. It is hinted by the Narrators ("Man" & "Woman") during the play that Mag and Joe die at the end. This is found true when it turns out that both Lovers drowned. Whether this is an accident or murder or a suicide is not stated in the play.

Losers[edit]

Losers is a play about two older lovers, Hanna and Andy, who are trying to make a relationship while having Hanna's mother, Mrs Wilson, and Cissy, next door neighbour, watching them constantly. Mrs Wilson and Cissy are very Catholic and do not think it is appropriate for Hanna's and Andy's relationship to continue. Mrs Wilson tries to break up their relationship by constantly ringing her bell, and wanting prayers. Towards the end of the play Andy comes home drunk and taunts Mrs Wilson and Andy that they're "Heads a marly" - a reference to the Saint Philomena whom Mrs Wilson is devout to. With this action Hanna proclaims "you'll regret this day Andy Tracey, you'll regret this day as long as you live". In the end Andy and Hanna are still together, however, they are stuck in a loveless marriage - divorce was frowned upon at the time - making them the Losers of the play.