Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)

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"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Kris Kristofferson
from the album The Silver Tongued Devil and I
Released 1971
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Length 3:47
Label Monument 8525-K
Writer(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Fred Foster
Kris Kristofferson singles chronology
"Jody and the Kid"
(1970)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again"
(1971)
"Taker"
(1971)

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)" is a song written and recorded by Kris Kristofferson. It was also released by Roger Miller, who included it on his album The Best of Roger Miller and released it as a single in July 1971. Ten years later, it was recorded by Tompall & the Glaser Brothers for the album Lovin' Her Was Easier.

Kris Kristofferson version[edit]

Kristofferson recorded the song on his 1971 album for Monument Records, The Silver Tongued Devil and I.[1][2]

Kristofferson's rendition of the song was not released to the country format. It reached 26 on the Billboard Hot 100 and 4 on Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks.[3] In Canada, it reached 21 on the RPM Top Singles charts[4] and 8 on that same publication's Adult Contemporary list.[5]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 26
U.S. Billboard Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks 4
Canadian RPM Top Singles 21
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks 8

Roger Miller version[edit]

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Roger Miller
from the album The Best of Roger Miller
B-side "Qua la Linta"[6]
Released July 1971
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Length 3:06
Label Mercury 73230
Writer(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Jerry Fuller[7]
Roger Miller singles chronology
"Tomorrow Night in Baltimore"
(1971)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again"
(1971)
"We Found It in Each Other's Arms"
(1972)

Roger Miller signed to Mercury Records in 1970 and had two Top 20 hits with the label between then and early 1971: the double-sided "South"/"Don't We All Have the Right" at 15 and "Tomorrow Night in Baltimore" at 11.[6] Mercury rush-released the single following a recording session in Los Angeles, California under the production of Jerry Fuller.[7]

Chart performance[edit]

Miller's version of the song entered the Hot Country Singles (now Hot Country Songs) charts in August 1971. The song spent eleven weeks on that chart and peaked at 28.[6] In Canada, the song debuted at 50 on the RPM Country Tracks charts dated for September 11, 1971,[8] peaking at 8 on the chart week of October 16.[9]

Chart (1971) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 28
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 8
Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary 11


Tompall & the Glaser Brothers version[edit]

"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again)"
Single by Tompall & the Glaser Brothers
from the album Lovin' Her Was Easier
B-side "United We Fall"[10]
Released 1981
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Label Elektra 73230[10]
Writer(s) Kris Kristofferson
Producer(s) Jimmy Bowen
Tompall & the Glaser Brothers singles chronology
"Sweet City Woman"
(1980)
"Lovin' Her Was Easier (Than Anything I'll Ever Do Again"
(1981)
"Just One Time"
(1981)

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers covered the song in 1981. This was the group's third single following its 1980 reunion, as frontman Tompall Glaser had departed the group in 1973 for a solo career.[11] The group's first two Elektra singles — "Weight of My Chains" and "Sweet City Woman" — both had seen minimal chart success and were never included on an album.[10] Released in mid-1981, this version of "Lovin' Her Was Easier" went on to become the group's highest-charting single.[10] It was also the title track of the Glaser brothers's reunion album, Lovin' Her Was Easier.[11]

Following the release of this song, the Glaser brothers recorded only four more cuts for Elektra before disbanding a second time. Jim Glaser began a solo career on the Noble Vision label, charting several singles in the early to mid-1980s, including "You're Gettin' to Me Again," which reached Number One.

Chart performance[edit]

Tompall & the Glaser Brothers' rendition of the song spent sixteen weeks on the Billboard country music charts. The song reached a peak of number 2 on that chart, holding the position for two weeks.[10] It also reached a number 2 peak on the RPM country singles charts.[12]

Chart (1981) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 2
Canadian RPM Hot Country Singles 2


Mark Chesnutt version[edit]

In 2010, Mark Chesnutt included a cover of the song on his album Outlaw, an album which comprises covers of songs recorded by "outlaw" country music artists. His version of the song was released as the first single from it.[13] Chesnutt told LimeWire that, although he was familiar with both Kristofferson's and the Glaser Brothers's renditions of the songs, he "wasn't a big fan of the song" until he heard Waylon Jennings sing it.[14] (Jennings recorded the song on his 1971 album The Taker/Tulsa.)[15]

Other versions[edit]

  • Waylon Jennings recorded the song for his 1971 album The Taker / Tulsa
  • Billie Jo Spears recorded the song as "Loving him was easier (than anything I'll ever do again)" in 1977 for her album If you want me
  • Nana Mouskouri recorded the song - also as "Loving him was easier (than anything I'll ever do again)" - in 1982 for her album Song for Liberty

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ruhlmann, William. "The Silver Tongued Devil and I review". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  2. ^ Ruhlmann, William. "Kris Kristofferson biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  3. ^ "Kris Kristofferson: Billboard Singles". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  4. ^ "RPM Top Singles: October 9, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  5. ^ "RPM Adult Contemporary: September 18, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  6. ^ a b c Whitburn, Joel (August 2008). Hot Country Songs 1944 to 2008. Record Research, Inc. p. 278. ISBN 0-89820-177-2. 
  7. ^ a b "Merc Followup on Miller Hit". Billboard: 58. 17 July 1971. 
  8. ^ "RPM Country Tracks: September 11, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  9. ^ "RPM Country Tracks: October 16, 1971". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  10. ^ a b c d e Whitburn, p. 163
  11. ^ a b Wolff, Kurt; Orla Duane (2000). Country Music: The Rough Guide. Rough Guides. p. 356. ISBN 1-85828-534-8. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  12. ^ "RPM Country Tracks: August 29, 1981". RPM. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  13. ^ Hackett, Vernell. "Mark Chesnutt pays tribute to his 'outlaw' heroes". The Boot. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  14. ^ "The Outlaw Side of Mark Chesnutt". LimeWire. Retrieved 16 July 2010. 
  15. ^ "The Taker/Tulsa". Allmusic. Retrieved 16 July 2010.