Lower Providence Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other townships in Pennsylvania with similar names, see Providence Township, Pennsylvania.
Coordinates: 40°09′01″N 75°25′05″W / 40.15028°N 75.41806°W / 40.15028; -75.41806
Lower Providence Township
Township
Country United States
State Pennsylvania
County Montgomery
Elevation 354 ft (107.9 m)
Coordinates 40°09′01″N 75°25′05″W / 40.15028°N 75.41806°W / 40.15028; -75.41806
Area 15.6 sq mi (40.4 km2)
 - land 15.4 sq mi (40 km2)
 - water 0.2 sq mi (1 km2), 1.28%
Population 25,436 (2010)
Density 1,458.8 / sq mi (563.2 / km2)
Founded 1805
Timezone EST (UTC-5)
 - summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code 610
Location of Lower Providence Township in Montgomery County
Location of Lower Providence Township in Pennsylvania
Location of Pennsylvania in the United States
Website: http://www.lowerprovidence.org

Lower Providence Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, United States, about 17 miles northwest of Philadelphia. The population was 25,436 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

Lower Providence Township was established in 1805 by the division of the former Providence Township into Upper and Lower Providence along the Perkiomen Creek.[1]

Lower Providence is part of the historic homeland of the Lenape people, called the Delaware Indians by early European settlers.

It was part of a large tract of land, which was granted to William Penn (citations to follow).

The Skippack Bridge was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.[2]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 15.6 square miles (40.3 km²), of which 15.4 square miles (39.8 km²) is land and 0.2 square miles (0.5 km²) (1.29%) is water.

Lower Providence Township includes a portion of Valley Forge National Historical Park and Evansburg State Park. Evansburg State Park provides for a multitude of recreational opportunities such as horseback riding, hiking, picnicking, biking, fishing and hunting. Mill Grove, the first home in America of the painter John James Audubon, is maintained as a museum and wildlife sanctuary by Montgomery County.

Neighboring municipalities[edit]

Nearby places of interest[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 3,189
1940 3,822 19.8%
1950 5,887 54.0%
1960 9,955 69.1%
1970 15,169 52.4%
1980 18,945 24.9%
1990 19,351 2.1%
2000 22,893 18.3%
2010 25,436 11.1%
http://www.dvrpc.org/data/databull/rdb/db82/appedixa.xls.

At the 2010 census, the township was 81.0% White, 7.1% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 9.7% Asian, and 1.3% were two or more races. 2.9% of the population were of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.[1]

At the 2000 census,[3] there were 22,390 people, 7,446 households and 5,606 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,458.8 per square mile (563.2/km²). There were 7,690 housing units at an average density of 501.0/sq mi (193.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 86.26% White, 7.25% African American, 0.11% Native American, 4.67% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.04% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.10% of the population.

There were 7,446 households of which 38.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.0% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.7% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.21.

26.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 33.7% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 9.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 112.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.3 males.

The median household income was $66,250 and the median family income was $74,902. Males had a median income of $47,489 compared with $35,896 for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,186. About 2.9% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.

Government[edit]

Presidential elections results
Year Republican Democratic
2008 46.1% 5,592 53.2% 6,450
2004 49.6% 5,465 49.9% 5,489
2000 50.1% 4,239 47.3% 4,003
1996 44.5% 3,215 42.4% 3,065
1992 41.8% 3,291 35.5% 2,797

Lower Providence Township is a municipality that is governed as a Township of the Second Class with a Board of Supervisors consisting of five elected residents. The Board of Supervisors is responsible for the appointment of the Township Manager, who executes the policies of the Board of Supervisors. The Board of Supervisors also appoints all advisory and regulatory boards. The current township manager is Richard Gestrich and the assistant township manager is Geraldine M. Golas. The members of the Board of Supervisors are Richard T. Brown, Chairman (term expires 2013), Don Thomas, vice-chairman (term expires 2015), Colleen Eckman (term expires 2015), Jason Sorgini (term expires 2017) and Jill Zimmerman (term expires 2017).

Education[edit]

Lower Providence Township is served by the Methacton School District. Woodland, Eagleville, Audubon and Arrowhead elementary schools; the Skyview Upper Elementary School and the Arcola Intermediate School are all located within the township. Methacton High School and Worcester Elementary School are located in Worcester Township.

Notable residents[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bean, Theodore W., ed. (1884). HISTORY OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY PENNSYLVANIA, ILLUSTRATED, 1884. Philadelphia: Everts & Peck. p. 1049. 
  2. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]