Lucasta Miller

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Lucasta Frances Elizabeth Miller[1] is an English writer and literary journalist.

Education[edit]

Westminster School

Miller was educated at Westminster School and Lady Margaret Hall, in Oxford,[2] receiving a congratulatory first in English in 1988. She was awarded a PhD at the University of East Anglia in 2007.

Career[edit]

Miller worked as deputy literary editor of the Independent in the mid-1990s. Known for her study in metabiography, The Bronte Myth (published by Jonathan Cape in the UK in 2001 and Knopf in the USA in 2003)[3][4][5] she has also been a contributor to The Guardian, as a profile and comment writer,[6][7][8][9][10] a reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement[11] and the Economist and was one of the judges of the Man Booker Prize in 2009.[12] She has been a trustee of the London Library and the Wordsworth Trust.

Personal life[edit]

In 1992 Miller married the tenor Ian Bostridge.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Debrett's People of Today 2005 (18 ed.). Debrett's. p. 175. ISBN 1-870520-10-6. 
  2. ^ "Lucasta Miller - Penguin Classics Authors - Penguin Classics". www.penguinclassics.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-07-27. 
  3. ^ Kakutani, Michiko (30 January 2004). "BOOKS OF THE TIMES; Freeing Charlotte and Emily From the Brontë Industry". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  4. ^ Griffiths, Joanna (31 December 2000). "Another Brontë hunter". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  5. ^ Hagestadt, Emma (4 January 2002). "The Bronte Myth by Lucasta Miller". The Independent (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  6. ^ Miller, Lucasta (15 January 2005). "Public figures, private lives". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  7. ^ Miller, Lucasta (6 September 2003). "Finding oneself in pieces". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  8. ^ Miller, Lucasta (7 April 2007). "Mother complex". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  9. ^ Miller, Lucasta (26 February 2005). "The human factor". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  10. ^ Miller, Lucasta (9 October 2004). "Seeing is believing". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  11. ^ Miller, Lucasta (26 June 2009). "Missing pieces". The Times (London). Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  12. ^ http://www.themanbookerprize.com/prize/thisyear/judges