Lucia Annunziata

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Lucia Annunziata.

Lucia Annunziata (Sarno, August 8, 1950) is an Italian journalist.

Career[edit]

Born in Sarno (in the Salerno province), at the age of 13 she moved to Salerno, where she attended high school and university, obtaining a degree in History and Philosophy. In 1977, she was 27 and worked at the 'manifesto'. On February 17, she was at the University of Rome, in which troops attacked Luciano Lama, went to the University for a rally and driven by autonomous armed with iron bars and cobblestones, the blocks of stone used to selciare the streets of the capital. And Lucy threw her good "sampietrino" against the hated Lama. In 1979 she became a professional journalist, working as a correspondent from the United States first for Il Manifesto, then for La Repubblica. In 1993 she won an International Fellowship from the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard. She then went on to work for the Corriere della Sera and finally for RAI (Italy's national public broadcasting company) in 1995 (with the "Linea Tre" program on Rai Tre); in August 1996 she became executive editor of the TG 3, although she resigned from the job at the end of November. In 2000, she became executive editor of the newborn news agency ApBiscom (subsequently renamed APCOM). She became President of RAI on March 13, 2003, and resigned on May 4, 2004; she was the second woman President of RAI (after Letizia Moratti in 1994). In 2005–2006, she hosted the interview programm In 1/2 h for Rai Tre, in which she famously interviewed then Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi. Currently, she works as columnist for La Stampa and as a panelist for The Washington Post.

The Berlusconi interview[edit]

On March 12, 2006, in the middle of the electoral campaign for the Italian general election, Lucia Annunziata interviewed the then Presidente del Consiglio dei Ministri Silvio Berlusconi, who was running for a second term, on her television program In 1/2 h (In half an hour). During the interview, she asked pressing questions about the works of Berlusconi's administration, often interrupting the Prime Minister's statements, which annoyed him to the point that he stood up and left the room halfway through the program.

The interview was cut short when Berlusconi stood up and left the room. She later reported[citation needed] that Berlusconi had handed her a list of questions he wanted to be asked, and requested she did not diverge from it during the interview; however, during the actual program, she did not follow the list and asked pressing questions, often interrupting Silvio Berlusconi's visible attempts at returning on track.

The political control board of RAI accused Annunziata of violating the Par Condicio, since that law states the interviewer should keep to a neutral stance during political interviews. She resigned from her job as executive editor of RAI in protest for Berlusconi's conflict of interest.

External links[edit]