Lucille Wilcox Joullin

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A funeral procession in Isleta in the 1900s featuring Father Anton Docher by Lucille Joullin

Lucille Wilcox Joullin (1876–1924) was an American painter known for her landscapes of California and the Pueblo Indians of New Mexico.[1]

Biography[edit]

Lucille (or Lucile) Wilcox Joullin was born in Geneseo, Illinois on September 6, 1876. She worked with John Vanderpoel at the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1894, she went to San Francisco . Her first marriage was to artist Jules Mersfelder. Her second was to Amédée Joullin (a painter himself) in 1907. The couple went on an extended honeymoon in Paris, returning to San Francisco in 1909. After the death of her husband in 1917, she married Edward H. Benjamin, a mining engineer,[2] and spent long periods in New Mexico. She lived in San Francisco until her death on June 5, 1924.

Exhibitions[edit]

Museum collection[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ George Wharton James, New Mexico, the land of the delight makers. The Page company. 1920. p.399.
  2. ^ Mining and scientific press, Volume 119.Dewey Pub. Co., 1919

References[edit]

  • Phil Kovinick, Marian Yoshiki-Kovinick, An encyclopedia of women artists of the American West. University of Texas Press. 1998.
  • George Wharton James, New Mexico, the land of the delight makers. The Page company. 1920.
  • Robert R. Preato, The genius of the fair muse: painting and sculpture : celebrating American women artists 1875 to 1945. Grand Central Art Galleries. 1987.

External links[edit]

  • Lucille Wilcox Joullin Benjamin on Askart [1]
  • Lucille Wilcox Joullin on America's Distinguished Artists [2]